628 reputation
36
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Jul 21 at 11:09

Sep
14
awarded  Commentator
Sep
14
comment Which is proper: “to debate X” or “to debate about X”?
What a bizarrely angry comment. I also think "debate about" is more common, at least in my own community (though you may argue that a community of British students is not any particular authority on anything). I find it hard to make this sensibly google-able, though, firstly because "debate about" is still correct when "debate" is a noun, but secondly also because "debate about" is clearly more colloquial than "debate".
Sep
14
comment Asking someone to let you know something
I believe the first is incorrect and the second is correct.
Sep
11
awarded  Critic
Sep
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
11
comment Non-lexical words
Of course you can - I 'understand' them all. Perhaps you could call them "neologisms" (though that might be granting them a little more of a status than they have).
Sep
10
comment What's the idiom for getting lost in a (malfunctioning) bureaucracy?
@CookieMonster: sorry, I wasn't clear. I agree with your understanding of the connotations of "versanden", but not of "get buried" (which I have also understood to be slow and incremental).
Sep
10
awarded  Supporter
Sep
10
comment What's the idiom for getting lost in a (malfunctioning) bureaucracy?
Cookie Monster: funny - that's not the impression I get from the term. Still, I don't know of a better term. Sorry!
Sep
10
answered What's the idiom for getting lost in a (malfunctioning) bureaucracy?
Sep
10
awarded  Teacher
Sep
10
answered “will likely have cut” usage correct?
Sep
10
comment Change from to-day to today
I imagine they felt exactly as I feel when pronouncing "e-mail" as opposed to "email". (Not especially different.)