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Apr
2
comment What would be a word for describing a tendency to take the literal meaning of words above the accepted meaning?
And for completeness, the noun form: literal-mindedness.
Mar
30
accepted Idiom: to hesitate when something is nearly finished
Mar
29
asked Idiom: to hesitate when something is nearly finished
Mar
20
comment Is there a word to describe female between 'girl' and 'woman'?
@Chick@ may or may not be good depending on the sort of circles you move in. I’ve known some groups where chick was a very common and neutral term, others where it was considered sexist and belittling (both in how it was received and in how it got used).
Jan
22
revised Why aren't there any common words for 'defecating' and 'urinating'?
wording
Jan
22
comment How old is the term “child minder”?
Here’s a 1948 example that looks reasonably valid: Annual Report of the Public Health Department, in Edinburgh. At least from what I can see on google books, there’s nothing to suggest it’s a supplement or similar. More generally, adding child-minder to the ngram searches suggests that this hyphenated form appeared on the scene a little earlier than the others, although they quickly overwhelmed it.
Jan
22
answered Why aren't there any common words for 'defecating' and 'urinating'?
Jan
14
comment Adjective for a thing done without regard to the situation
@EdwinAshworth: I think you’re interpreting OP’s question over-literally. Most adjectives have an adverbial form; a pair like callously and callous would pretty clearly fit OP’s bill.
Jan
14
comment Word for individual who tips the balance
I’ve heard ringer used similarly in amateur orchestras/bands, when outside players (not regular members) are brought in for a concert to strengthen a small or weak section.
Jan
14
comment Word for individual who tips the balance
This is in no way an answer to the question. It does describe the person in the illustrative example given, but it describes a different aspect of that person from the one asked for.
Jan
7
comment An idiom meaning “sticking fingers in your ears does not change the fact”
I’ve mainly heard versions of this from the days when barometers (aka “weather-glasses”), not thermometers, where the instrument in question. From the original (fantastic and under-appreciated) Casino Royale: “You can break the bloody glass, but you can’t hold back the weather.”
Dec
22
comment Where does English get the word “condom” from?
The original title was extremely misleading — it looked like you were asking about a different word, with a well-understood etymology. In case you feel strongly that the word should be asterisked out, then by all means revert that aspect of my edit; but it should at least be shown as being a six-letter word, not four-!
Dec
22
revised Where does English get the word “condom” from?
clarified title (previously very misleading)
Dec
22
comment Difference Between “Sell” and “Sale”?
@EdwinAshworth: as a fellow Brit, they are homophones for at least some of us. Unless I’m hyper-articulating, I don’t think I make any distinction between them in most contexts — the first vowel in both is usually a schwa for me. (An exception: in the noun sense of affect, I stress the first syllable.) The OED agrees with you, though: it gives the British pronunciation of affect as /əˈfɛkt/, and of effect as /ᵻˈfɛkt/.
Dec
22
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What method of counting puts Twelfth Night on January 6th?
Dec
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
3
awarded  Yearling
Dec
2
comment What is the best way to describe someone who is very social in a party?
@RoddyoftheFrozenPeas: “social butterfly” has a slight connotation (to me) that their social interactions tend to be only superficial.
Nov
27
comment Idioms that mean making decision between two good options
mplungjan: while you’re right that it needn’t be just an agreement between people, I think @mjkrebbs is right that win-win situation doesn’t fit this question. A win-win situation is where some single option is good in multiple ways (especially, in ways that one might have expected to be in conflict). This question asks for something where multiple options are under consideration.
Nov
26
comment Euphemism for poo
These are all fun fanciful ways to put it; they’re not common, neutral phrases for the act, though.