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Apr
15
comment When did “More tea vicar?” start to be used after farting? Where did it come from?
@camden_kid: it’s far from ubiquitous, but it definitely persists among people of a certain sense of humour. As a 30-something Brit (though I’ve lived elsewhere for a while now) I know a few people my age who certainly use the phrase.
Apr
3
comment Looking for an expression that sounds worse than “cardboard” to describe blandness of a food
@HotLicks: if you put “sawdust” or “Styrofoam” into an answer, I would vote for them over any of the current crop. They should be very widely-understood (unlike pabulum or stale matzoh), not controversial (unlike tofu), and unlikely to be misunderstood as emphasising any other aspect (unlike shoe leather or stone soup).
Mar
15
comment “Country” is to “compatriot” as “species” is to what?
For the general question asked, conspecific in the other answer is better. But for the specific example given, specimen is excellent.
Feb
24
answered Looking for a word for the point in time where one day becomes another
Feb
19
reviewed Edit Which is the correct idiom: “First thing's first” or “First things first”?
Feb
19
revised Which is the correct idiom: “First thing's first” or “First things first”?
Added link, and updated definiton text, now that OED offer a free, online resource. Also, capitalized "Google." Google is a proper noun.
Feb
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
18
comment How to pronounce miracle?
@BrianHitchcock: is it possible that a broad form of the pin–pen merger might equate the first vowels of mirror and merry? I haven’t come across it, but it doesn’t seem obviously implausible.
Feb
18
reviewed Leave Open What does the phrase “Have weight to ” mean?
Feb
17
comment Derogatory term for a corporate employee
Quite aside from how derogatory it is or can be, I second the commenters above saying that this doesn’t seem to fit the question, because it’s specifically associated with management.
Feb
10
comment What is a word that means an instance of a game?
I don’t find this unnatural, as some other commenters do; I find it inaccurate. To my ear, “a session of Monopoly” pretty unambiguously means any period of playing without a break: we might play half a game in the session and leave the rest till after dinner, or in a long session we might play three games. It explicitly does not mean what the question asks for. That said, it’s very relevant to the discussion.
Feb
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
23
comment Opposite of “trendy” without a negative meaning
Established or well-established are slightly more emphatic alternatives.
Dec
23
comment Opposite of “trendy” without a negative meaning
If talking about clothing, music, or the like, then classic, timeless and so on are excellent. But for the example in the question, talking about trends in the software industry, they’re rather less natural choices.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
I’m tempted to delete this whole discussion now, to remove noise. Let me know whether you agree, and then I’ll either delete all my comments on this answer, or else just this comment :-)
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
Oh! I’m sorry; you’re absolutely right. I’d misread your examples, missing the inversions and only noticing the frontings. Yes, I agree they’re completely ungrammatical.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
@JanusBahsJacquet: I agree that “Makes this dress…” is absolutely ungrammatical, and that “Than my sister…” is at best highly marked. But fronting a temporal phrase like “After lunch…” is I think quite standard; a Google books search gives plenty of examples in published, edited writing.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
@Janus: I agree that the than example in the answer sounds ungrammatical. But your examples in comments sound not just correct but completely unremarkable to me, for either writing or speech. (32, BrE, in case that's a factor.)
Dec
3
awarded  Yearling