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7h
awarded  Nice Answer
11h
comment One word for 'something that can be overlooked'
Do you mean “it would be easy to overlook it”, or “overlooking it would not cause problems”? These are two very different things that your wording could indicate.
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
2
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
I would understand this one as similar to “using a sledgehammer to crack a nut”: it emphasises overpoweredness, not counterproductiveness like the OP’s proverb.
Feb
2
comment English equivalent for “Don't burn your house to smoke out a rat!”
@Sumyrda: why would you expect that the English came from the German? Without further historical information, the opposite direction surely seems equally likely.
Jan
29
comment What do you call a unit of beer within a pack?
@DCShannon: yes — it may vary regionally, but when I lived in Pittsburgh, it was very common to buy beer as cases consisting of four six-packs. This may be partly to do with local liquor laws — I forget the details now, but roughly, large-scale beer stores were only allowed to sell in cases of at least 24, while bars/restaurants could sell smaller units but had to pay a higher tax band or something.
Jan
17
comment Word for “truncate to size zero”
@SomethingDark: that’s a default for certain programming languages, but not for English as spoken by most humans. For me, truncate in a programming context certainly can include the case of truncating to length 0, but my default expectation would be a non-zero length. Possibly there are some communities who would use it for 0 by default — I haven’t spent time around SQL professionals, for instance — but in the absence of other evidence, I somewhat doubt it.
Dec
23
comment What do you call a person who refuses to do something/certain things?
Comment/meta-answer: the best word depends very much on what the person is refusing to do. If a boss refuses to give permission for fun activities in the workplace, stick-in-the-mud is perfect. If a neighbour repeatedly refuses to turn down the radio, stubborn is better. If an employee refuses to work on a morally questionable project, then refusenik or conscientious/principled objector is most apt. It seems that for this question, there are lots of good more-specific phrases, but no great one-size-fits-all option.
Dec
16
comment Is it “chalk it up to” or “chock it up to”?
Just to elaborate on @sumelic’s comment: the reason that chock and chalk are homophones for some but not all speakers is the cot–caught merger.
Dec
15
revised Proper use of the word “lousy”?
Changed dead link to an Internet Archive mirror
Dec
14
comment Saying a number digit by digit
Worth noting also that this varies with region and subculture. E.g. “two hundred fifty six” is markedly American: Brits and I think most other commonwealthers would have as “two hundred and fifty six” as the standard un-abbreviated form.
Dec
10
answered What is the established antonym for “confluent”?
Dec
3
awarded  Yearling
Nov
19
comment A single word for 'regularly visited place'
@Josh61: I for one would. “She guessed the boys would be hanging out at one of their usual haunts in town — Dunkin Donuts, perhaps, or over at the Kwik-E-Mart.”
Nov
4
comment What difference can be expected by saying “Trump the Campaign ” instead of saying “the Trump Campaign"?
The Streetcar example is perhaps clearer with a shorter title: “Jaws, the book, was written in 1974. Jaws, the film, was released in 1975.”
Oct
29
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
20
comment Is there a word for accidentally stealing something?
@JonStory: I agree, by default it still connotes intention. But the connotation is not absolute, as this example shows: it is much more natural to say walked off with it by accident than stole it by accident.
Oct
15
comment If cow = beef, pig = pork, and deer = venison, then where is the word for human = [flesh as food source]?
Besides ouvrier, one could also imagine paysan (peasant/countryman) having beceme the term.
Oct
15
comment If cow = beef, pig = pork, and deer = venison, then where is the word for human = [flesh as food source]?
@JNF: In French mouton is the standard word for sheep, as well as its meat; veau similarly means calf as well as its meat; porc again is the standard word for pigs, as well as pork. Boeuf is not the standard word for cow — that’s vache, which like cow in English is used both as the generic term and specifically for females — but boeuf means roughly ox, bullock, steer (I am not an expert on the subtleties of castrated bovines), as well as beef. For source: look up these words on French Wikipedia, and see that the animals as the default meaning.
Oct
8
reviewed Close What type of lock is this? (image included)