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1d
comment Opposite of “trendy” without a negative meaning
Established or well-established are slightly more emphatic alternatives.
1d
comment Opposite of “trendy” without a negative meaning
If talking about clothing, music, or the like, then classic, timeless and so on are excellent. But for the example in the question, talking about trends in the software industry, they’re rather less natural choices.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
I’m tempted to delete this whole discussion now, to remove noise. Let me know whether you agree, and then I’ll either delete all my comments on this answer, or else just this comment :-)
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
Oh! I’m sorry; you’re absolutely right. I’d misread your examples, missing the inversions and only noticing the frontings. Yes, I agree they’re completely ungrammatical.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
@JanusBahsJacquet: I agree that “Makes this dress…” is absolutely ungrammatical, and that “Than my sister…” is at best highly marked. But fronting a temporal phrase like “After lunch…” is I think quite standard; a Google books search gives plenty of examples in published, edited writing.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
@Janus: I agree that the than example in the answer sounds ungrammatical. But your examples in comments sound not just correct but completely unremarkable to me, for either writing or speech. (32, BrE, in case that's a factor.)
Dec
3
awarded  Yearling
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
@tchrist: I agree, but what seems surprising is that it’s difficult to find any other word in English with such strong postposition restrictions.
Dec
3
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
@psusi: There’s a difference between the academic linguistic usage of sentence, and the everyday usage. The academic sense of sentence includes sentence fragments, questions, and so on. The everyday usage of sentence corresponds to what a linguist, speaking carefully, might describe as something like “a declarative sentence, with neither the main verb phrase nor its subject elided”. I would take the question to be asking about sentences in the more colloquial sense.
Dec
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
2
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
@CarSmack: I’m not sure, I’m afraid — I’m not a trained linguist, just an amateur, so while I have read around the subject a decent bit, my knowledge is fairly patchy.
Dec
2
revised Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
fixed broken link
Dec
2
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
Re the second question, “ago” seems impossible to start a sentence with (that is, a simple declarative sentence). Credit: I found that in ShreevatsaR’s answer to a similar-but-not-quite-the same question. Intrestingly, ShreevatsaR suggests there that he believes there are other such words… but “ago” is the only example he or anyone else gives that doesn’t get immediately refuted.
Dec
2
comment Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
@HotLicks: I try to explain in my answer below why some examples of this approach work better than others.
Dec
2
revised Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
added another example
Dec
2
answered Is it possible to start a grammatically-correct English sentence with the word “Than”?
Nov
28
comment Is there a word or phrase for someone who strongly disapproves of smoking, drinking and gambling?
As per @AndrewLeach’s comment, puritanical is perhaps even better than Puritan.
Nov
23
comment What is the American word for 'tea-towel'?
Dishcloth is another common alternative, though dish towel is probably more dominant (based on my own experience in the US together with this interesting ngrams graph: goo.gl/sxyPFK ) @chiastic-security: as a fellow Brit, drying-up cloth was the name my family used when I was growing up (in London, one parent from Essex, one from Australia).
Nov
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
3
comment Gender-neutral alternative to “craftsmanship”?
So in many cases, I believe it is worth trying to find alternatives for -man compounds; I don’t try to police how others speak, but I do consider this in choosing my own words. I agree in this case that craftsmanship doesn’t seem to retain any gendered connotations (going both on my own intuition, and corpus searches others have posted in comments). But I don’t think it’s such an open-and-shut case as this and some other answers suggest.