16,410 reputation
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location Illinois
age 55
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 1 hour ago

I have worked in a technical support role for several industries and love the problem-solving aspects of my work as well as helping clients maximize their productivity.

I'm driven by a life-long curiosity about the world and people around me. My passions range from creative writing, photo-editing, performing and listening to music, problem-solving puzzles such as sudoku, cooking and baking, all types of crafting, sewing and yarn arts, creative resources on the internet and learning new apps for my favorite toy...my iPhone.

profile for Kristina Lopez on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


2h
comment Pronoun for meat: it or some?
What seems odd to me, is that I don't hear native speakers talk about meat that way usually. Chicken is meat, beef steak is meat, pork roast is meat, but when it comes to talking about eating meat, we tend to say either "I like steak. Can I have that tonight?" or "I want some chicken", for example. There are idioms for meat where "meat" is used, such as "I'm a meat-and-potatoes kind of girl!" or "I'm throwing some meat on the grill, want some?" (In that last case, there would likely be a mixed assortment of meat, making use of "meat" acceptable there, IMO)
Jan
26
comment Term for a person responsible for the next action
The answers to this question may be useful...english.stackexchange.com/questions/117734/…
Jan
26
comment Verb for giving others presents when you're happy
Hmm, I'm not sure anyone I know would understand that (I'm a US Midwest native).
Jan
23
comment 'To dissect someone's anatomy' in a figurative sense
I like your old broad, being one myself (sans the little mutt). My two cents' worth...pansy is spelled with an s, not a z. The last phrase should be "...said the gumshoe.", not a gumshoe. Good luck with your writing! :-)
Jan
22
comment a jargon word for administrative
"operations" is used to define the office staff under certain circumstances.
Jan
21
comment What is an adjective synonym for “discretion” or “up to you?”
How about, "It's your choice."? (BTW - "I don't care for the color of the car" means you don't like the color of the car. I think you meant "I don't care about the color of the car.".)
Jan
21
comment When Harry met Sally - idiomatic expression
It's not idiomatic, to my knowledge, other than most people's familiarity with the movie. That aside, "when X met Y" is a succinct way to pinpoint the event of the meeting of X and Y and there may very well be a story there. I personally wouldn't hesitate to use that construction to launch a story of the meeting of two people, products, etc.
Jan
21
comment An expression for not giving up when you know you should
LOL! Been there/done that! :-)
Jan
21
comment An expression for not giving up when you know you should
None of these expressions fit the OP's request, IMO.
Jan
21
comment Is there a better term for a groceries divider bar?
It's referred to as a "divider" or just "stick" where I shop. "May I have the divider?" is how I usually ask the shopper ahead of me in line.
Jan
21
comment A single word to define “leave in state of ignorance”
@WS2 - I'm still looking for the etymology. There are anecdotal references to ill-fitting powdered wigs made of wool that crafty lawyers would figuratively pull down over judges' eyes in the courtroom, or robbers would yank down over gentlemen's eyes whilst robbing them. I need to dig a little deeper still, I think.
Jan
20
comment Could you guys point out if I did any mistakes on this amateur fiction book?
What everyone else said...but I'm just curious how someone can twitch their left ear...unless they're a human/animal hybrid with specific muscles to allow directional movement of their ears!
Jan
20
comment Is there any saying or idiom equivalent to: “Hold your own hat, so the wind don’t blow it away?”
+1 Your answer is very much along the lines of the OP's request, IMO, though probably a bit long for idiomatic usage.
Jan
20
comment What do you call an abrupt, abstract ending to a sentence?
Looks good - and is that much more helpful to anyone reading your answer in the future!
Jan
20
comment What do you call an abrupt, abstract ending to a sentence?
+1 Good word - I learned something new! :-) You may want to include the definition and name the source in your answer in addition to the link, in case the link goes away at some future time.
Jan
19
comment Does being described as a “Whirling Dervish” have a positive or negative connotation?
@Kik, that is very true for newly coined words and new definitions for old words but it's reliability, exactly because it is crowdsourced, is as questionable as Wikipedia. Again, though I consider both to be a resource, I rarely use either as a stand-alone reference and cross-check facts before relying on the information obtained from either of them.
Jan
19
comment Does being described as a “Whirling Dervish” have a positive or negative connotation?
Ugh! Am I the only one who cringes when I see that the Urban Dictionary is used as a source here? Granted, though, some newer words and expressions can only be found there...this not really being one of them, IMO.
Jan
16
comment What is the etymology of “word!”
I'd recommend changing the title of this question to "What is the etymology of "Word!"
Jan
16
comment Word that encompasses a person's mood, activity, company, etc
I'm not sure you can get mood, company and activity wrapped up in one short (or long) word.
Jan
15
comment Noun describing the act of controlling one's own mind
+1 I like this "new-ish" term because it implies self-control but with a raised awareness in the process.