15,065 reputation
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location Illinois
age 54
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen 16 mins ago

I have worked in a technical support role for several industries and love the problem-solving aspects of my work as well as helping clients maximize their productivity.

A life-long curiosity drives my interests ranging from creative writing, photo-editing, music, problem-solving puzzles such as sudoku, cooking and baking, all types of crafting, sewing and yarn arts, creative resources on the internet and learning new apps for my favorite toy...my iPhone.

profile for Kristina Lopez on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


9h
comment Sometimes what you are most afraid of doing is the very thing that will set you free
An example would be if your worst fear was to be alone, but you went ahead and divorced your spouse because your relationship was really bad, then even though you took steps that caused you to be alone, you set yourself free to be available for a future, hopefully happier relationship.
9h
comment Can we use “workaround to this” instead of “solution to this”?
In my world (software support), "workaround" is usually not a good thing since it implies that there's something wrong with the product or process and an alternate way to solve the problem is employed. It is a solution, just not one I'd like the end-users to employ - except in the case of an emergency and then just until a permanent solution can be developed, fixed or deployed.
14h
comment Compactify an expression like “if you cannot accept…” or “cannot live with…” for rhythmic reasons
Try "if you loathe erroneous data"
2d
comment Word for beginning a statement with a disclaimer / caveat / hedge when you are worried you might say something incorrect
Actually, I think @Oldcat's right, but maybe you just need the right phrase to use those words. I'd say "Don't preface everything with a disclaimer" or "You don't need to couch every response with a caveat"
2d
comment “I'm sorry for” vs. “I'm sorry about”
In my own usage, I can say "I'm sorry about your folks' divorce" or "I'm sorry about yesterday." and without context, you wouldn't necessarily know whether or not I'm culpable for the thing for which I'm apologizing. Whereas "I'm sorry for yesterday." is saying, "I'm sorry for (causing the fight/confusion/spilled paint) yesterday." However, you can also say "I'm sorry for you because your pet goldfish died.", which I am not the cause. There are a number of idiomatic expressions that include "sorry". I'm not sure how to learn them all which is why this is a comment (albeit a lengthy one!)
2d
comment Is it ok to use fraught in a sentence without saying what the thing is fraught with?
I've never heard it used that way where I live (US Midwest).
Aug
26
comment “Building the sand castles” synonyms
I agree with RegDwight but in the meantime, there is "a house of cards" that has the temporariness of a sand castle, but can also be interpreted as someone who builds something that has the illusion of sturdiness but is not meant to last - in other words, a scam.
Aug
26
comment What exists between tolerant and enthusiastic?
POB stands for Primarily Opinion Based, @TimPost - one of the options to close a question. I think that your request has merit since it might bring out a number of interesting choices running the gamut between "tolerance" and "enthusiasm".
Aug
26
comment In past tense use break or broke
Here's a tip: if you use thinking, then punch should be punching and break should be breaking. "I was thinking of punching him and breaking his teeth." Unless, of course, you already punched him and broke his teeth.
Aug
26
comment 'Dim as dishwater', or 'dim as ditchwater'?
I never heard "dim" used with that idiom, only "dull as dishwater". I always thought it was related to hair color because there's a color (natural, you can't buy this) called "dishwater blond". Anyway, as illogical as "dull as dishwater" sounds or seems, that's the idiom and "dim as dishwater" would likely have people scratching their heads wondering what metaphors your splicing. :-)
Aug
25
comment When to use Affect and effect?
or of this one: english.stackexchange.com/questions/24037/…
Aug
25
comment Is a 'peeve' the same thing as a 'gripe'?
@KitFox, I think peeving is a gateway to arguing and escalated hostilities but not synonymous with more heated disagreements - IMO, of course! :-)
Aug
25
comment Is a 'peeve' the same thing as a 'gripe'?
@WS2, I didn't see any cited source that peeving can include ranting and raging, etc. Again, in my culture, peeving is complaining about relatively minor issues, like someone habitually leaving the toilet lid up. I don't deny that an unresolved peeve may eventually evolve into a full rant or even a rage (when the proverbial camel's back has been broken), but they are distinctively different. (Thanks for worrying about me! lol!)
Aug
25
comment Is a 'peeve' the same thing as a 'gripe'?
If I have a peeve and I think you should hear about it, I'll say, "that's one of my peeves" or "that's a pet peeve of mine" (a very idiomatic phrase in my part of the world).
Aug
25
comment Is a 'peeve' the same thing as a 'gripe'?
@WS2 I'm not denying that it's unkind, but that doesn't make it any less true if someone is characteristically annoyed by what others may consider "minor" issues. FWIW, in my culture, (AmE, Midwest region), it's common to say about ourselves, "that's a pet peeve of mine". If someone else called my posting "a peeve", I guess I'd have two choices, own it or deny it. But if it walks like a duck... :-)
Aug
25
comment Is a 'peeve' the same thing as a 'gripe'?
If you call someone "peevish", aren't you saying that they are someone who gets annoyed by minor issues? So if that is true, how can a "peeve" be too strong of a word?
Aug
22
comment Eww! Has it crossed the pond yet?
The "ewww" thing seemed to come into popularity in the 1980s with the emergence of Valley Girl-speak (California, US). Jimmy Fallon (US late night talk show host) recently reprised this era with a skit of a pretend talk show called "EWWW": youtu.be/sIhU3mQTp1U you're sure to get your fill of "ewww" here! lol!
Aug
21
comment Do you hear “snarky”, to imply some level of wry, off-the-cuff, perhaps mildly acerbic, humor?
Yes, but I also hear it (and use it) to mean a thorny situation such as bad traffic, a complicated work problem or even a bad attitude - "his response seemed rather snarky - I wonder what's eating him?"
Aug
21
comment Word for “person living with in-laws” or “feeling awkward and inadequate”
+1 for "freeloader son-in-law" though that's probably how the in-laws feel, not the son-in-law. lol!
Aug
21
comment Word for “person living with in-laws” or “feeling awkward and inadequate”
There's no such succinct word that I'm aware of, but there are expressions for the awkward feeling of intruding and feeling out-of-place, such as being a "bump on a log", a "bull in a china shop", a "5th wheel", although the last one really is more for someone who tags along when the rest of group is paired up with dates.