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comment A word for an inescapable and pointless situation?
It certainly is, @PellMel. I wonder if there is a regional/national bias to use one word or the other since here in the Midwest US, I've heard "quagmire" much more frequently than "morass", though they seem virtually synonymous.
Apr
29
comment What is the word for the gesture when someone takes three fingers and kisses it into the air?
That's not a gesture used by English-speaking countries so I'm not sure you'd find an English word for it.
Apr
27
comment Leaving someone with lots of questions in mind
I don't think so. They're all a serviceable word for the OP's question but of the 4 words/expressions, I think that "high and dry" says it best...for me, of course. :-)
Apr
27
comment Leaving someone with lots of questions in mind
+1 for "high and dry".
Apr
27
comment Please help me in choosing between too / also / as well in a specific case
I have another "Americanism" for you TrevorD....bet you'll hate this one too. :-p
Apr
26
comment I think I spider / My English is not the yellow from the egg
You can use them but I'm not sure anyone would know what you mean. The "my English is not the yellow from the egg" sounds like an expression translated from another language but I'm unsure what is meant by that expression. "I think I spider" is ungrammatical and again, I don't know what is meant by that expression.
Apr
26
comment Does “Please verify your address” mean what I think it means?
You're right. They should really say, "I'd like to verify your address, would you please state it for me."
Apr
26
comment Personification of Guilt, Hate and Hunger
Welcome Ashes! Are you looking for one word to satisfy all three traits? Could you provide a sample sentence with a blank where this word or phrase should be?
Apr
22
comment Is it conceivable that President Obama might use the word “queue”?
Maybe it's the example...at least in the US Midwest, we'd say "There was a ​long line for ​tickets at the ​theater".
Apr
21
comment What is the origin of the British English saying: “It's got bits missing”?
"It's got" is idiomatic for "there are". So it doesn't really have bits which clashes with "missing" as there are bits that are missing.
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
"Two of a kind" does not intrinsically have a negative connotation - but if, in context, you are talking about the first horrible boss, the negativity would be implied if you said that he and the new boss are "two of a kind" or "birds of a feather". If I can think of a more suitable expression, I'll post it as an answer.
Apr
20
comment I have a question regarding “I'am sorry”
It's a little more common to not personally apologize for something you have not caused and to say instead, "Unfortunately, the item you needed..."
Apr
19
comment Using “some” to describe units of time
I like your question @nebulon! I would suggest, though, that you edit your Pt 1 - Pt 4 comments into your question so that they are not inadvertently lost.
Apr
19
comment What's the name of this phobia?
You probably want to include the definition for anablephobia in your answer as well as cite the source...just in case the link fails in the future.
Apr
14
comment How is wee used in Northern Ireland?
What @JohnClifford said... I first picked up on it being more than just "small" from the Outlander books (Diana Gabaldon's epic series - there's more than a wee bit of Scottish dialog there!) It often seems to be a de-emphasis on the word following it. Or to insert some modesty, if offering something of one's own to someone else...a wee bite, for example.
Apr
13
comment Help for literature school work
Is "old" an important component in the word choice?
Apr
13
comment What are the rules to use “so”, “Such” or very
But you can say "so jerky" or "very jerky" instead of "such a jerk".
Apr
13
comment Using “speaking” in the wrong context
...and it's more idiomatic to say "people are talking about". (At least it's more idiomatic here in the US to say "talk about" as opposed to "speak about").
Apr
12
comment A word for persons who won't advance or improve
Please include your own attempts to research this word. Also...punctuation is your friend! :-)
Apr
12
comment What words describe the relation between “dollars” and “cents”?
Monetary denominations?