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Jul
24
comment A word for a squared layout of differently shaped objects
+1 - I learned something new!
Jul
24
comment word for “splitting time between various tasks”
I've worked in businesses where a floater fills in for employees that are out on sick leave or taking vacation. I didn't get a sense of that type of function from the OP. The question sounds more like someone who's responsibilities include a number of different projects that all need to be worked on but not serially (in other words, they're not required to complete one before moving onto the others).
Jul
24
comment word for “splitting time between various tasks”
That could be considered "juggling projects" which has a high degree of informality. Most employees have to do something called "time management" to allow enough time, through planning, for all the projects they are assigned to complete in any given period of time.
Jul
22
comment How can I understand these puzzling sentences?
@Jarl, we pretty much figured the sentences weren't yours but you can mention the textbook as the source. (No apology necessary!) 😊
Jul
21
comment What is a word for someone who hates endings?
By "hate" do you mean that an ending makes the person angry, depressed, sad, frustrated, unfulfilled, anxious? If you could give an example sentence, that would help a lot! :-)
Jul
21
comment How can I understand these puzzling sentences?
Point taken @deadrat, and there was no accusation meant. I'm sure no one here is intending to commit plagiarism and any oversight is unlikely to result in any formal accusation but the fact is that regardless of the purpose of citing sources, we can't intuit the OP's reasons for omitting the citations so it's just good practice to include them.
Jul
21
comment How can I understand these puzzling sentences?
Ha, that was my thought too, @deadrat - although... :-) Still, if they're not Jarl's words, the source should be cited.
Jul
21
comment How can I understand these puzzling sentences?
Can you please include the source for these sentences? (Otherwise, it's plagiarism!)
Jul
21
comment What's a negative word for “subtle”?
It would probably be helpful for you to include a definition for those words as well as citing the source.
Jul
21
comment What's a negative word for “subtle”?
+1, "elusive" would be my #1 choice.
Jul
17
comment How do I say “my car is broken” idiomatically?
Though not very articulate, it is perfectly acceptable to say "my (car, TV, computer, marriage) is broken." People will get the gist and know that you mean that there is something wrong of some nature or another.
Jul
16
comment What does “Sport Utility Vehicle” actually mean?
What does your research show? Please include it in your question so the rest of our members know where you've already looked for your answer.
Jul
16
comment By definition, can you believe in something that's not true?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about philosophy, not English language usage.
Jul
16
comment By definition, can you believe in something that's not true?
This question is off-topic for this site. You might want to try the Philosophy Stack Exchange site. philosophy.stackexchange.com
Jul
15
comment What does being a team player mean?
@ScotM, maybe so though I would think a blander euphemism might have been easier to deliver, such as "we'll let you know", followed by an e-mail thanking you for your interest but that they "went with someone else".
Jul
15
comment What does being a team player mean?
"team player" meaning is easily available online. Please include your research and then any particular question you may have on the meaning of the expression. (As an aside, IMO, that wasn't a very nice thing to hear someone say to you at an interview!)
Jul
15
comment nothing is holding *thinks up* if you need something
It's probably a typo and is supposed to say, "I just want to ensure that nothing is holding things up if you need something." The idiom is "holding things up", meaning to cause a delay or a stoppage of progress.
Jul
15
comment Is this improper English?
@RK01, your version isn't quite right yet. it's "freelancer", not "freelance", and it should be "I am very interested in writing..." , not "interested about writing".
Jul
15
comment Is there a general rule that dictates how the connotation of a sentence changes depending on the ordering of its words or clauses?
Those sentences don't even make sense. Why did you eat breakfast quickly? What did the train being late have to do with having to eat breakfast quickly? Wouldn't you have more time for breakfast if the train was late? How you would know the train was going to be late? This could just be me but I think you might need a better example.
Jul
15
comment How to translate the modern use of dutch term 'strippenkaart'
@Sander_P, I've heard it called a "saver pass" or "super-saver pass" also.