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location Illinois
age 54
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
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I have worked in a technical support role for several industries and love the problem-solving aspects of my work as well as helping clients maximize their productivity.

A life-long curiosity drives my interests ranging from creative writing, photo-editing, music, problem-solving puzzles such as sudoku, cooking and baking, all types of crafting, sewing and yarn arts, creative resources on the internet and learning new apps for my favorite toy...my iPhone.

profile for Kristina Lopez on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


31m
comment Origin of British term “to bits”
I wouldn't be surprised to discover that "to bits" morphed from "to pieces", (as @Tim Lymington answered) and possibly gained popularity because of use by a character from a TV show or movie.
40m
comment What Defines a Utah Accent?
I got a bunch of hits on this query on Google: "what is a utah accent".
59m
comment Meaning of the quote by Helena Christensen
You know, it could also mean that she's symbolically a girly-girl and the high heels represent the trappings of an ultra-feminine woman. Since both your and my speculations are opinion-based, this question should be off-topic.
6h
comment Single-word “Open your mouth!” imperative form
Or in my contextual experience, @BrianDonovan, a grouchy old dentist waving a dirty old wooden spoon at me, barking "Open!". lol!
6h
comment Is it correct to say “I was sure after a year I would get over it”?
"I would get over it" is correct. You can also say "...after a year I would have gotten over it".
21h
comment An expression meaning the feeling you get seeing something so beautiful it hurts
Thanks for fixing my typo @Erik Kowal! :-)
1d
comment The true meaning of “did not immediately respond to requests for comment”
I think there's a very slight weasel-y-ness to "did not immediately respond to requests for comments" because the average person may not pick up on "immediately" and think of the other, more definite negative-charged statement, "did not respond to our requests for comments".
1d
comment How to emphasize pronunciation of a specific letter?
What @JohnLawler said - except I didn't know it was called a macron - I call it the "long A" line. I've seen other logos use that successfully, like the pipe-clearing product, "Drāno".
1d
comment He nearly drowned
@JanusBahsJacquet, the tsunami example is most definitely fitting an "almost drowned" label. For the guy who didn't go swimming though, "almost drowned" is still catastrophizing to me and could be more reasonably stated as "I could have drowned today if I had gone in the water."
1d
comment He nearly drowned
To me, saying in the 2nd scenario that he "almost drowned" is catastrophizing the situation. Even if he had been in the water that day, there's no crystal ball saying he would have drowned. You could say, though, that a potentially dangerous situation was averted by not going in the water that day.
Jul
18
comment Men who are lured by the seductive beauty of women are called?
+1 for Olympia Dukakis' line about Cher's life going down the toilet. My #1 favorite movie ever and "moonstruck" is a great word for the enchantment of the characters! :-)
Jul
18
comment One who can not bargain
Isn't that called buying "retail" or "off the rack"?
Jul
18
comment What is a word/s that describes somone who refuses help from others? And, a word that describes someone who has and never will forgive someone else?
Actually, IMO, working through RegDwight's questions yourself makes for an excellent writing exercise so that you mull on the characteristics of your characters and get to know them more intimately than getting suggestions from outsiders. Best of luck with your writing! :-)
Jul
16
comment Looking for a specific alternate word for proved
Could you be thinking of "He redeemed himself"? I know that "redeem" and "proved" are not synonymous but "he redeemed himself" is a very idiomatic phrase (without the "well" at the end).
Jul
16
comment Is “overly” a stronger form than “too”?
@Marc Gravell - my comment was not to suggest that anyone should always limit their word choices, but I question choosing an odd word that has no perceived nuance of difference in meaning (in your words: "flat synonym"). Personally, using large or obscure words for no particular advantage or meaning come off as sounding pompous, IMO.
Jul
16
comment atemporal means not relate to specific time; is there a word for “not related to specific place”?
"Nowhere", "in no particular location", "anywhere", "nowhere in particular" come to mind but no "atemporal"-type word.
Jul
16
comment Is “overly” a stronger form than “too”?
If you use it overly much, you'll probably get strange looks because no matter how correct it is, it's just not typical.
Jul
16
comment Is this text grammatically correct?
No, it's not correct and there are numerous problems with the sentence. You may consider visiting our sister site for questions such as this. ell.stackexchange.com
Jul
15
comment A single word for “liking someone's speech/quote/idea”?
So you want one word that expresses specifically the same as "well-said", "well-put", "beautifully-stated", etc.?
Jul
15
comment Emotions in different languages
This question appears to be off-topic because it is not about English language usage.