13,133 reputation
42348
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location Illinois
age 54
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 33 mins ago

I have worked in a technical support role for several industries and love the problem-solving aspects of my work as well as helping clients maximize their productivity.

A life-long curiosity drives my interests ranging from creative writing, photo-editing, music, problem-solving puzzles such as sudoku, cooking and baking, all types of crafting, sewing and yarn arts, creative resources on the internet and learning new apps for my favorite toy...my iPhone.

profile for Kristina Lopez on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


2d
comment Who would you say would be Ariel Dorfman's contemporaries in his writing style?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about authors, not English language usage.
Apr
11
comment Don' t ask a policeman what time it is!
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about 12 vs. 24-hour time keeping standards.
Apr
11
comment A more formal word for “tech-savvy”, relating to IT technologists in particular
I chose that word, @Drew, because password manager apps are exactly the kind of new "gadget" a technophile would gravitate to. A technophile doesn't need to know how to create a password manager app to want to use one.
Apr
9
comment Why are foreign words used in modern vernacular?
or worse, @WS2...I've heard "whore's d'ovaries". Yikes! :-)
Apr
8
comment Meaning of “affectionate abandon”
It does if you'd allow a similar use of "abandon" in the more common expression, "wild abandon"...as in this example: "The freshman senator kissed his aide, under cover of a parking garage, with wild abandon". In that usage, "abandon" is synonymous with "recklessness".
Apr
7
comment regarding “Oriented” vs. “orientated”
What is your question?
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Marthaª, it's not just the turning of "work" into "workee". It's the meaning of the expression that parallels the meaning of "no tickee, no washee". And as far as "meaner" goes, I didn't invent the original expression, I'm only citing it as I said, a historical reference. If it offends you, I'm very sorry. What I can't understand, ultimately, is your hostility. May I suggest de-caffee? lol! Just kidding! You can't take anything too seriously here! :-)
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Marthaª, unless you designed the coffee cup with that saying, you didn't "come up" with that expression. This is a question and answer site. I answered a question with some historical background suggesting that it is the source of the OP's referenced expression. You're perfectly welcome to like it or not - and if not, to provide cited evidence of another source of that expression. :-)
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@horatio, you're right about the actors, but their dialog is meant to sound a little like the pidgin English, I think. It's kind of a thing here in the US that the commercial is very un-PC nowadays.
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Marthaª, opinions without citation are usually not acceptable here. Do you have anything more concrete to refute that it's more than coincidence that "no coffee, no workee" has parallel meaning and odd wording than my answer? Please share! :-)
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Marthaª, comments aside, which I already explained how they came to be, since this site is supposed to be for supported answers, you can't argue with the fact that mine does have historical precedence. The fact that others see it is as playful rhyming, though not untrue, is without any cited source.
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Marthaª, the comments in the other answers came before my answer. Otherwise, that's totally not my style. :-)
Apr
4
comment What is the opposite of “Boon”?
@jboneca, FWIW, I'm in the US and I know the expression as "boon or bust".
Apr
4
comment What is the opposite of “Boon”?
@bib, "boom or bust" is definitely the preferred expression based on the ngram but "boon or bust" is represented also, so it's known, just less used.
Apr
3
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@FumbleFingers..."typical ignorant colonial" meaning one of us Yanks?
Apr
3
comment Bike Race question - Loser gets to be the girl
Without the movie, it might be pure speculation on what is meant by that phrase. (Though there are several possible explanations - Roger's being the one that came to my mind also).
Apr
3
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Mynamite, Oh boy, that's fraught with PC no-no's! lol! Here in the US, we had a laundry soap (or water softener?) TV ad in the 70's that had stereotypical Chinese laundry workers use their Chinese Pidgin English to hawk the product..."Ancient Chinese Secret!": youtu.be/BJP5f-fsHrs
Apr
3
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Mynamite. I totally agree also that it's a play on words - and it stands on its own now. I was only trying to make the point that it didn't appear out of a vacuum. It has a history that fortunately is not popular any longer.
Apr
3
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@choster, you can attribute child-like qualities to the saying if you want but I don't know many children that speak Chinese Pidgin English. Try looking it up instead of just arguing about it. :-)
Apr
3
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Mynamite, that's because you're probably not as old or from the same part of the world as me. :-)