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location Illinois
age 55
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
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I have worked in a technical support role for several industries and love the problem-solving aspects of my work as well as helping clients maximize their productivity.

I'm driven by a life-long curiosity about the world and people around me. My passions range from creative writing, photo-editing, performing and listening to music, problem-solving puzzles such as sudoku, cooking and baking, all types of crafting, sewing and yarn arts, creative resources on the internet and learning new apps for my favorite toy...my iPhone.

profile for Kristina Lopez on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


22h
comment what is the correct answer?
You're right, grammatically, either fits the sentence. Someone can be "in touch with..." or "out of touch with..." so technically your teacher is wrong unless he/she is making a derogatory statement about "old" people, in which case, clearly, "out of touch" would be the answer they're looking for.
Mar
27
comment What does word “jibi” means?
It was certainly not meant to be gratuitous, Abe, but OPs asking poor questions who are conscientiously prodded by the community to provide more information, should either provide that information or as we're doing here...leave it to the community to close the question. What isn't particularly useful is to have answers based on incomplete question information. Sometimes it's better to not answer a question than to hazard a guess at what the OP is asking - although I think we all get sucked into doing that occasionally. At least now I know what a "jib" is! :-)
Mar
27
comment Single word for generic human “body parts”
"Body parts" does it for me because it includes limbs and organs and even eye balls - everything except blood and other fluids which aren't really body parts as much as body ingredients. :-)
Mar
26
comment “why oh why” or “why, oh why”?
All true, @StoneyB, but are you advocating commas or no punctuation between the last 5 words?
Mar
26
comment “why oh why” or “why, oh why”?
Be that as it may, @StoneyB, it's traditionally not sung as straight quarter notes and some artistic stylization is usually applied that would make the addition of slight pauses (commas) helpful to the singer.
Mar
26
comment “why oh why” or “why, oh why”?
I'm curious...seeing as that is an established lyric from the song "Over the Rainbow", is there a reason you wouldn't look up the punctuation online or did you find conflicting versions of punctuation for the song?
Mar
26
comment What does word “jibi” means?
Can you at least use it in a sentence as how you heard it?
Mar
26
comment What does word “jibi” means?
But "jib" is not "jibi".
Mar
26
comment What does it mean to call someone a 'drink of water'?
I watched the clip and think that the whole quote is important to the context. When one of the guys points out Andy (Tim Robbins) to Red (Morgan Freeman), and asks what he thinks, Red says, "A tall drink of water with a silver spoon up his ass." That sounds like an insult, to be sure, but maybe the whole quote is important to the meaning.
Mar
26
comment What does it mean to call someone a 'drink of water'?
The quote is "a tall drink of water with a silver spoon up his ass" when Red sees Andy for the first time. I'm not sure Red was looking at Andy as your "tall drink of water", though your definition is the only one I'm familiar with.
Mar
26
comment Someone or something small yet capable of having big influence?
That's what I was thinking...or for full analogy..."a David vs. Goliath" scenario.
Mar
26
comment In terms of putting
"In terms of" can mean the same thing as "Regarding..." or "As to...". Basically it's an introduction to the topic of "putting this (whatever this is) forward."
Mar
25
comment Is there a word or phrase for walking into a room to get something but then forgetting what you went in there to get?
hmmm - as often as it happens, you'd think this group would know it and I hope someone does. My cohorts call it "Sometimers Disease" or CRS-syndrome (for Can't Remember S**T). :-)
Mar
25
comment “It's a long time that” - correct or not?
"Long time that" is not correct usage by a native speaker, but by all means, feel free to join the 35 million other users of that phrase and like many of them, you'll not be very well understood.
Mar
25
comment How can reading improve your English?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about improving one's English which is listed on the off-topic list in the Help Center for this site.
Mar
25
comment How can reading improve your English?
Please re-read the on- and off-topic section of the Help Center...this question is off-topic because it is about improving your English: english.stackexchange.com/help/on-topic
Mar
25
comment Is there a single word that refers to a vagina secreting lubricant in response to sexual arousal?
That's also used to describe a woman that is perspiring in other non-vaginal places.
Mar
25
comment Why the extra syllable in words like these ending in -r and -l?
@Nicole - listen to the pronunciation link on this site and count the sounds...there are 2 sounds to peel: dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/american-english/peel
Mar
25
comment How to ask a girl out
Can't.help.myself...to add to @Mari-LouA's excellent advice, I would also suggest that you don't need to know a lot about art - but get her to talk about what she likes about it and ask her to show you art that is meaningful for her. IMO, nothing makes a person feel more special than being asked about their interests. Good luck! :-)
Mar
25
comment Why the extra syllable in words like these ending in -r and -l?
Sorry @Robusto, but an extra syllable in back to make it sound like bayuck, is not the same thing as the 2-syllable rear or peel which even "accent-neutral" US Midwesterners pronounce with two syllables. I think the OP is onto something here and hope there are some informative answers.