15,047 reputation
42653
bio website
location Illinois
age 54
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen 33 mins ago

I have worked in a technical support role for several industries and love the problem-solving aspects of my work as well as helping clients maximize their productivity.

A life-long curiosity drives my interests ranging from creative writing, photo-editing, music, problem-solving puzzles such as sudoku, cooking and baking, all types of crafting, sewing and yarn arts, creative resources on the internet and learning new apps for my favorite toy...my iPhone.

profile for Kristina Lopez on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


14h
comment Eww! Has it crossed the pond yet?
The "ewww" thing seemed to come into popularity in the 1980s with the emergence of Valley Girl-speak (California, US). Jimmy Fallon (US late night talk show host) recently reprised this era with a skit of a pretend talk show called "EWWW": youtu.be/sIhU3mQTp1U you're sure to get your fill of "ewww" here! lol!
1d
comment Do you hear “snarky”, to imply some level of wry, off-the-cuff, perhaps mildly acerbic, humor?
Yes, but I also hear it (and use it) to mean a thorny situation such as bad traffic, a complicated work problem or even a bad attitude - "his response seemed rather snarky - I wonder what's eating him?"
1d
comment Word for “person living with in-laws” or “feeling awkward and inadequate”
+1 for "freeloader son-in-law" though that's probably how the in-laws feel, not the son-in-law. lol!
1d
comment Word for “person living with in-laws” or “feeling awkward and inadequate”
There's no such succinct word that I'm aware of, but there are expressions for the awkward feeling of intruding and feeling out-of-place, such as being a "bump on a log", a "bull in a china shop", a "5th wheel", although the last one really is more for someone who tags along when the rest of group is paired up with dates.
2d
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
Right, you are, @Brilliand. Moreover, I'd have to dig into the ngrams to prove it, but I suspect that the general usage of "out" and "outing" came after "coming out of the closet" got shortened to "coming out" or just "out".
2d
comment When should we expect an answer
+1 Would it sound weird to say "When may we expect an answer?" (I'm second-guessing the can/may issue here)
2d
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
Looks like a drive-by downvoting @mplungjan! Both answers and the question got downvoted. grr!
2d
comment IMHO, I am great?
IMHO is probably not formal enough if corresponding with a higher authority. It has a sense of casualness that is the norm in social media. Even omitting the "humble", "in my opinion" is not necessary because if it's your idea or argument, unless another source is cited, it's be default, your opinion. IMO or IMHO is often used as a softener or preface but if you want to be taken seriously, just state your reasons without the clutter of a preface...IMO. :-)
2d
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
@mplungjan, yeah, same for my link - gotta bury that in my browsing history! lol!
2d
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
@Dan, if I saw an ad that had a baseball with the word "OUT" superimposed on it, I still think my first thought might be that it's about a gay baseball player. Now if it said, "You're Out!", given the additional context of a baseball expression, that would be different. :-)
2d
comment Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
@IgorR, as a AmE native speaker, in the context of today's social environment, if I saw something called "OUT", my first assumption would be that it was about someone's sexual orientation being exposed.
2d
answered Does the word “out” carry sexual-minority flavour?
Aug
19
comment word describing the demographic make up of those members attending the church worship majority of the time
"the devout"? "the faithful"? "the committed"?
Aug
19
comment Is there a word for making something or someone confess?
Where is your own research? There are many idiomatic phrases having to do with confessions and the act of making someone confess.
Aug
19
answered Other ways to say a project is ahead of schedule?
Aug
18
comment How come “wise man” and “wise guy” have opposite connotations?
And let's not forget the "wise guy" that is another name for a mob thug.
Aug
18
comment what does “ Plant Your arse” mean?
Isn't "arse" BrE, @FumbleFingers? I suspect that "Plant your ass" might be used in the US...where, I'm not sure.
Aug
18
comment so mainstream or too mainstream
That depends on context. "so mainstream" is more idiomatic and is ambiguous whether it is good or bad but "too mainstream" conveys a negative connotation.
Aug
18
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is there a common word for floor and ceiling?
Aug
15
comment Word for a group of similar photos?
Works for me Josh! +1