13,132 reputation
42348
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location Illinois
age 54
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen 1 hour ago

I have worked in a technical support role for several industries and love the problem-solving aspects of my work as well as helping clients maximize their productivity.

A life-long curiosity drives my interests ranging from creative writing, photo-editing, music, problem-solving puzzles such as sudoku, cooking and baking, all types of crafting, sewing and yarn arts, creative resources on the internet and learning new apps for my favorite toy...my iPhone.

profile for Kristina Lopez on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


5h
comment find something gone or find something has gone
Rain away, @FumbleFingers, to my eye and ear, "my kidney has gone" sounds strange and slightly suspicious. :-)
5h
comment find something gone or find something has gone
If you "find your kidney has gone", it sounds like it left on its own accord. If you kidney is missing (and hasn't grown legs), than you'd say you "found it gone".
5h
comment Two step method or two steps method
It should be called a two-step method, IMO.
1d
comment What does it mean to speak with “mock deference”?
Good point about the text - or as my colleagues and I like to say, "Transcript reads....".
1d
comment Is there a noun that means “the state of being flustered”?
1) I was feeling "flustered". 2) I was feeling all "flustery!" 3) I was in SUCH a "flustered" state!
1d
comment Whether my thinking sir conveys more respect is really correct or not?
@ElliottFrisch, of course, you're right, but in the context of addressing Mr. Gates in a blog or website comment area, the man's full, spelled out name and title would sound as odd (to me) as a bunch of extraneous "sirs". :-)
1d
comment Whether my thinking sir conveys more respect is really correct or not?
@user72227, if adding "sir" is traditional and commonplace in your English-speaking culture, you might only sound out-of-place in a non-local locale, such as a US-based blog or website. In that case, it's best to take the advice given in your 3 related questions and omit the extra sirs. A respectfully phrased question or comment will suffice. I assure you that "Mr. Gates" is the utmost sign of respect in our (US) culture. :-)
1d
reviewed Approve suggested edit on I want to refer to Bill Gates on his blog with respect in the comments section
1d
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Which would you place in parentheses: the expansion or the abbreviation?
1d
comment Why do Americans leave the ordinal suffix out of dates?
It's my understanding that "Fourth of July" is used as the idiomatic name of our independence day holiday...otherwise it's usually just "July 4th".
Apr
15
reviewed Close The behavior that sell goods and service daily basis and collect payment monthly
Apr
15
reviewed Close “Teaching fish to swim”
Apr
15
reviewed Close “Less for more” or “More for less”?
Apr
15
reviewed Close The use of “as”
Apr
15
reviewed Close How do you pronounce the surname Derges
Apr
15
reviewed Close What exactly is the difference between “misinformation” and “disinformation”?
Apr
15
reviewed Close Appropriate replacement of “nice to meet you” for online salutation?
Apr
15
reviewed Close “that one consider” or “that one considers”?
Apr
15
reviewed Close What did the poet Carl Sandburg write about?
Apr
15
reviewed Close Plural form of these two sentences