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11m
comment A word/phrase to express deep sadness at a friend or loved one's stupidity?
I know what you mean @JeffH. Betrayal also comes to mind but that seems a little too personal and isn't quite right to me either.
56m
answered A word/phrase to express deep sadness at a friend or loved one's stupidity?
1h
comment Two ends of a street
Possible duplicate of A word for the beginning of a street?
1d
comment What is the term for feeling down because of bad weather?
Actually, where I'm from, if you say you're feeling "under the weather", it means you're feeling sick, not just blue because the weather's bad.
1d
comment Heard a native saying: “did you see where she had a baby??” refering to Facebook
I suppose when most news was passed by "word of mouth", the common expression would have been "Did you hear that Betty had a baby?" or "Did you hear about that train derailment?" I actually still use that though I may have "seen" the news online or on TV....just like some even older oldtimers might call their refrigerator an "ice box". Just a matter of habit, I guess.
1d
comment What is the best movie to watch for a foreigner trying to understand modern American culture?
"The Party" with Peter Sellers juxtaposes 60's Hollywood stereotypes with a simple man of foreign origin. It's painfully funny.
2d
awarded  Good Answer
2d
revised A word for an inescapable and pointless situation?
added 357 characters in body
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
May
3
comment A word for an inescapable and pointless situation?
It certainly is, @PellMel. I wonder if there is a regional/national bias to use one word or the other since here in the Midwest US, I've heard "quagmire" much more frequently than "morass", though they seem virtually synonymous.
May
3
answered A word for an inescapable and pointless situation?
Apr
29
comment What is the word for the gesture when someone takes three fingers and kisses it into the air?
That's not a gesture used by English-speaking countries so I'm not sure you'd find an English word for it.
Apr
27
comment Leaving someone with lots of questions in mind
I don't think so. They're all a serviceable word for the OP's question but of the 4 words/expressions, I think that "high and dry" says it best...for me, of course. :-)
Apr
27
comment Leaving someone with lots of questions in mind
+1 for "high and dry".
Apr
27
comment Please help me in choosing between too / also / as well in a specific case
I have another "Americanism" for you TrevorD....bet you'll hate this one too. :-p
Apr
26
comment I think I spider / My English is not the yellow from the egg
You can use them but I'm not sure anyone would know what you mean. The "my English is not the yellow from the egg" sounds like an expression translated from another language but I'm unsure what is meant by that expression. "I think I spider" is ungrammatical and again, I don't know what is meant by that expression.
Apr
26
comment Does “Please verify your address” mean what I think it means?
You're right. They should really say, "I'd like to verify your address, would you please state it for me."
Apr
22
comment Is it conceivable that President Obama might use the word “queue”?
Maybe it's the example...at least in the US Midwest, we'd say "There was a ​long line for ​tickets at the ​theater".
Apr
21
comment What is the origin of the British English saying: “It's got bits missing”?
"It's got" is idiomatic for "there are". So it doesn't really have bits which clashes with "missing" as there are bits that are missing.
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
"Two of a kind" does not intrinsically have a negative connotation - but if, in context, you are talking about the first horrible boss, the negativity would be implied if you said that he and the new boss are "two of a kind" or "birds of a feather". If I can think of a more suitable expression, I'll post it as an answer.