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  • 92 votes cast
Apr
5
comment Is it “set A or B” or “sets A or B”?
Now I regret the sharp comment I have recently added to your answer to someone else's question. It is true that I did not care for your answer over there, but your answer here helps.
Apr
5
comment Is it “set A or B” or “sets A or B”?
I do not know who has edited my question's title, but thanks. The title now asks what I meant.
Apr
5
revised Is it “set A or B” or “sets A or B”?
added 4 characters in body
Apr
5
comment Is “their futures” acceptable?
I like your technique. I am curious: can one apply the technique to this question? english.stackexchange.com/q/237679/25823
Apr
5
comment Is “their futures” acceptable?
Well, @MariusHancu's answer probably supersedes my comment. Thanks, Marius. Good point.
Apr
5
comment Preposition before noun phrases
@garrett: But your answer does not answer the question asked, does it? It only offers advice as to how to evade the question asked. The question is reasonable. The question is interesting. The answer is dull.
Apr
5
revised Is it “set A or B” or “sets A or B”?
Added a third example.
Apr
5
comment Is “their futures” acceptable?
The phrase is perfect, with each word ideally placed and inflected. Whether you need the adverb successfully (which seems redundant) or can upgrade the Latinate prepare to the Saxon ready, is another question. Good luck.
Apr
5
comment Problem with sentences structures
If something like this helps, feel free to use it: "Widely skilled in design, implementation, management and maintenance, he possesses specialized knowledge of the architecture of fully redundant, highly available, fault-tolerant production networks, of both the wired and wireless types." Too many matters of translation are there to detail in a comment, and of course one can word the sentence other ways to emphasize other points, but I will note one item: the hyphen. The English construct "adverb adjective noun" is usually styled "adverb-adjective noun" if the adverb does not end in -ly.
Apr
5
revised Preposition before noun phrases
Admitted that the answer has probably been proved wrong.
Apr
5
comment Preposition before noun phrases
I fail to see any logic in the distinction, but idiomatically somehow, the distinction persists. Excellent point.
Apr
5
comment Preposition before noun phrases
That is a good question. I don't know.
Apr
5
revised Is it “set A or B” or “sets A or B”?
Got faster to the point.
Apr
5
answered Preposition before noun phrases
Apr
5
asked Is it “set A or B” or “sets A or B”?
Mar
10
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
28
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
13
comment What is the word for “technical usurpation of an old word”?
@FumbleFingers: Fair enough. If you have time, please feel free to edit the question as you see fit. Your ideas are probably better than mine.
Sep
13
comment What is the word for “technical usurpation of an old word”?
@FumbleFingers: I have added your train to the question.