333 reputation
19
bio website
location Virginia
age 46
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Dec 28 '13 at 2:57

Thaddeus H. Black is a licensed Professional Engineer and Master Electrician in the commonwealth of Virginia. He is also a Debian Developer.


Dec
28
accepted Modus vivendi, modus praevalentis
Dec
4
answered A XHTML document or An XHTML document
Dec
4
comment Mix active and passive voice in the thesis
In practical academic engineering writing, you have to use both voices in appropriate instances, as you suggest. In engineering in particular, the passive voice is used extensively for the sole purpose of eliminating as many instances of I and me as possible, especially since engineering in particular harshly judges the use of the indefinite we, sometimes condoned in the sciences and, of course, often allowed in philosophy and mathematics. No, you are right. You have no good alternative. Use active to speak of someone else's work. Use passive to speak of your own work, as a rule.
Dec
4
answered Mix active and passive voice in the thesis
Dec
4
answered Synonym of bad effect or bad situation - one word
Dec
4
comment Modus vivendi, modus praevalentis
@FumbleFingers: Fair enough. I should be happy to take the question elsewhere. Did I misread the forum's latin tag, though? "Questions about the use of Latin words and phrases in English."
Dec
4
asked Modus vivendi, modus praevalentis
Sep
8
awarded  Yearling
Jul
16
awarded  Quorum
Jul
13
revised Is using “he” for a gender-neutral third-person correct?
added 23 characters in body
Jul
13
comment Which is correct, “in the past one hundred years” or “in the past hundred years”?
You can put those words in my mouth, with my thanks. I only wish that I had thought to speak them, myself.
Jul
13
answered Is using “he” for a gender-neutral third-person correct?
Jul
13
comment Is there a single word that means “cause(s) of death”?
I should hasten to add, however, that the word bane, though quaint and grown rare, is still current and can still be used with care.
Jul
13
comment Is there a single word that means “cause(s) of death”?
It's a shame how languages decay, really. Endings are worn off words such that extra words become necessary to say the same thing with less precision (compare Spanish to classical Latin). Deep, one-syllable words like bane disappear but from poetry. It is unfortunate.
Jul
13
revised Is there a single word that means “cause(s) of death”?
added 13 characters in body
Jul
13
revised Is there a single word that means “cause(s) of death”?
added 313 characters in body
Jul
13
answered Is there a single word that means “cause(s) of death”?
Jul
13
awarded  Commentator
Jul
13
comment Difference between “ignorant” and “uninformed”
@ThePopMachine: Not only is the English sense of to willfully choose to "not know" more recent, it is also seldom attested by good writers, who (as you have observed), know what ignorare actually means. By this I mean no offense to the answerer, who of course is more or less right about the words' colloquial usage in some places.
Jul
13
comment Difference between “ignorant” and “uninformed”
Disagree. Context can attach negativity to practically any word, but no negativity at all conventionally attaches to uninformed as the word in and of itself is used by good writers, any more than negativity conventionally attaches to forgotten or short. The word in this sense is not at all like thankless or wicked, among others, to which negativity does attach even when no specific context is supplied.