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seen Dec 8 at 17:41

Feb
8
awarded  Scholar
Feb
8
accepted Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
Jan
27
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
@FumbleFingers, I think that might unfairly slander "incertum," which after all can be quite lovely. Since we are unnaturally stretching the distance between subject and verb, I would propose such sentences be described as "procrustean" :)
Jan
26
revised Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
Adding new info
Jan
26
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
@JonHanna, Yeah as a "rule" his fourth is nonsense, but I do think it has value as a guideline.
Jan
26
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
Agreed on all points. And I wasn't terribly optimistic of getting an answer for the reasons you mention, but I figured there was some chance someone has named this principle. If no one else comes in with a definitive answer, I'll accept yours.
Jan
26
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
@JonHanna, I'll be the first to admit the example is a bit strained. This principle comes up naturally when I edit, but unfortunately I didn't have one of these "in the wild" examples on hand when I thought to ask the question, so I quickly made one up.
Jan
26
revised Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
edited title
Jan
26
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
Jon, thanks for taking the time to write such a long and thoughtful response. In my defense, I made a point of saying "rule OR principle" (intending principle as a synonym for guideline as you are using it) to avoid getting sidetracked by the issue of exactly how hard (or loose) this guideline is. I really was just curious if it has a name. I did edit the OP to remove the word "rule" so that others wouldn't be distracted by this point either.
Jan
26
awarded  Editor
Jan
26
revised Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
added 10 characters in body
Jan
26
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
@BillFranke, Neither of the sentences was being offered up as an example of stellar writing. I just needed a quick example so that I could ask my question. I agree your rewrite is better, but it does not illustrate the principle I am asking about. My question is not about how to rewrite a particular sentence in the best way. I just want to know if the principle has a name. If you don't like my example sentences, feel free to edit with better ones that illustrate the principle.
Jan
26
awarded  Student
Jan
26
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
I don't see how this applies, even if you meant it as a joke.
Jan
26
awarded  Critic
Jan
26
asked Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
Jan
6
awarded  Supporter
Sep
8
awarded  Teacher
Sep
8
answered Meaning of the word 'orthodox' in sentence?