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  • 31 votes cast
Jun
26
comment Does the word 'clique' have a negative connotation?
I agree, but tweet and wall are familiar words. I'm not suggesting that you choose boring, abstract words. But if you're looking for something outside the box, your experience with graph theory probably isn't the well you want to draw from. Familiar words being used in slightly unfamiliar ways, or perhaps a new coinage whose sound still evokes the feeling you're going for.
Jun
26
comment Does the word 'clique' have a negative connotation?
If you're creating a product for ordinary users, why even consider your personal associations from a narrow field of mathematics that 99.9% of the population has no knowledge of?
Jun
1
comment Word for the satisfaction of hearing a concept named for the first time?
That's fair, but I still think, in practice, the primary association of the comparison (to everyone except MJ himself) is foolishness rather than delight and discovery. Eg, if I used it to label a friend's experience, he'd probably think I was poking fun at him, and if I used it to describe my own, it would have an air of self-deprecation. Yet I'm looking for something without these overtones...
Jun
1
comment Word for the satisfaction of hearing a concept named for the first time?
Ha! Nice connection to make. The problem is MJ has merely learned a fancy-sounding synonym for "speech." His delight stems from his foolish belief that everything he says is now elevated -- not in finding a word for something that previously lacked one, or a word that crystallized vague thoughts or generated new insight. This is a good suggestion when playful ridicule is your intent, but not, imo, when you wish to convey genuine epiphany. +1 nevertheless.
Jun
1
answered A is “nested” in B, B is … A?
May
31
awarded  Yearling
May
31
comment Word for the satisfaction of hearing a concept named for the first time?
@Lucky, +1 for "autological," I was actually wondering if such a word existed as I made that comment. Sadly, I suspect there will be no autological answer to my OP. BTW, in a nice example of the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon, I read yesterday in Pinker's "The Sense of Style" that the prohibition against combining Greek and Latin words is a spurious one, invented by grammarians out of thin air and without foundation in historical usage. Even better, the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon was only on my mind because it happened to come up in google while I was searching for an answer to the OP!
May
31
comment Word for the satisfaction of hearing a concept named for the first time?
Thanks, but no. As noted at the end of my post, I'm looking for something specific to the epiphany of hearing a concept named -- "epiphany" is too general. Of course, "the epiphany of a perfect name" is roughly what I mean, but is far too clunky to give the delight I'm talking about. Because the correct answer to my question will itself be an example of what it names :)
May
31
awarded  Commentator
May
31
comment Word for first sale of the day
@onomatomaniak, The answer is still effectively no, despite Mehper's answer. Very few English native speakers, myself included, have ever heard the word "Handsel" and they would not understand its meaning if they did.
May
31
revised Word for the satisfaction of hearing a concept named for the first time?
added 10 characters in body
May
31
asked Word for the satisfaction of hearing a concept named for the first time?
Feb
24
comment What is it called when someone does an action they don't fully understand?
In cargo-culting, people were ritually imitating the behaviors of Americans (eg, building non-functional replicas of planes) without actually understanding how what they were imitating worked: thefreedictionary.com/cargo+cult. So, eg, a foreigner non-sensically stringing together overheard English words seems similar.
Feb
24
answered What is it called when someone does an action they don't fully understand?
Feb
8
awarded  Scholar
Feb
8
accepted Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
Jan
27
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
@FumbleFingers, I think that might unfairly slander "incertum," which after all can be quite lovely. Since we are unnaturally stretching the distance between subject and verb, I would propose such sentences be described as "procrustean" :)
Jan
26
revised Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
Adding new info
Jan
26
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
@JonHanna, Yeah as a "rule" his fourth is nonsense, but I do think it has value as a guideline.
Jan
26
comment Does this stylistic guideline have a name?
Agreed on all points. And I wasn't terribly optimistic of getting an answer for the reasons you mention, but I figured there was some chance someone has named this principle. If no one else comes in with a definitive answer, I'll accept yours.