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Apr
3
comment Sabotaging through purposeful procrastination
Dilly dallying and dawdling definitely have the connotation of deliberate, but I think the malice is missing. You can dilly dally to avoid something you don't want to do without trying to sabotage someone else's plans.
Dec
30
awarded  Custodian
Dec
30
reviewed Reviewed “Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”
Dec
30
comment “Plan to do” vs. “plan on doing”
I don't think that's accurate. If you say, "I'm planning on going to the game on Saturday," that doesn't carry any implication that you have a specific plan that begins after you get there---just that it's a thing you intend to do.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
29
awarded  Yearling
Aug
29
awarded  Yearling
Mar
15
answered What is the proper way to spell “inspiraysh”?
Dec
10
comment Number agreement when using “(s)” for optional plural
Are you asking whether the singular or plural should be used or whether or not to use the article when using (s)?
Oct
30
comment Why is a black eye called a “shiner”?
Could it simply be that a big black, blue, or purple mark around your eye looks shiny? (Edit, I noticed you mentioned that as a possibility and that you hadn't noticed the skin as shiny. Looking at a couple pictures of black eyes online, the light does seem to reflect a little differently than off unbruised skin, giving a little bit of a shine. (It might also be that it's not actually shinier, but the color contrast draws your eye to it.)
Oct
3
answered What's wrong with this sentence?
Sep
26
revised “To support”, “in support of” and “in support for”
Updated to add mention of the 3rd possibility & give a clear choice.
Sep
26
comment “To support”, “in support of” and “in support for”
I don't think your final examples quite work. It's not using "in support for" as a phrase the same way "in support of" is used. Instead "support" is the object of the preposition "in" with a second prepositional phrase, "for the war," modifying "support."
Sep
26
awarded  Commentator
Sep
26
comment Compound adjectives functioning as adverbs modifying other adjectives; is it possible and grammatical?
Downvoted because it's incorrect. Yes, flat adverbs exist, but that doesn't mean every adjective can be used as an adverb. Breathtaking isn't used as an adverb in any source I can find.
Sep
26
awarded  Critic
Sep
24
answered Compound adjectives functioning as adverbs modifying other adjectives; is it possible and grammatical?
Sep
21
answered Perspired as a passive verb?
Sep
19
awarded  Nice Answer