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Sep
22
reviewed Reviewed Expression for a choice which isn't really one
Sep
22
comment Expression for a choice which isn't really one
In reviewing this question, I have Hobson's Choice...
Sep
22
reviewed Reviewed Is there a term for simultaneous snow and rain?
Sep
22
comment Is there a term for simultaneous snow and rain?
Let me be the first to say "Not convinced" :)
Sep
18
comment What is the meaning of the phrase “moving the needle”?
+1 for the piccie
Sep
18
answered “Launch a missile at” vs. “in” vs. “from”
Sep
12
comment Is “make due” now considered acceptable?
In my book, "make do" and "make due" are very different things, and can only attribute this to poor proof-reading and/or relying on spell-checker or grammar-checker
Sep
9
comment Coney and rabbit: what’s the difference?
+1 for the comprehensive answer. I'm from North Yorkshire and my granddad was a gamekeeper. For years as a kid, I never quite equated rabbits (white fluffy things the neighbours had as pets) with coneys (grey/brown pests that got shot and eaten)
Sep
9
awarded  Commentator
Sep
8
answered What do I call my paid account?
Sep
8
comment What is the origin of “a cut above/below the rest”?
Of all the possible usages of "cut" I would have fashion/tailoring low down the list... and whilst the other suggestion of butchery has merit, I suspect jewellery/gem-cutting (the more facets the better) or possibly herbology/pharmacy where drugs are cut with bulking agents
Aug
30
answered Is there a word or short phrase to indicate a myth that is not true?
Aug
29
awarded  Quorum
Aug
29
comment Lost in the Midst vs Mists of Time
Furthermore, other dictionary meanings of midst include enveloped by, in the thick of, surrounded (etc).
Aug
29
comment Lost in the Midst vs Mists of Time
Perhaps the analogy with "sands of time" is relevant... this indicates the passing of time in an hourglass. The midst of time indicates not at the beginning, and not in the present - but somewhere in the part in-between. There are no "mists" in time...
Aug
29
comment Lost in the Midst vs Mists of Time
YMMV but I'll stick with my version, unless someone can prove the taxonomy. But I certainly remember my English Master (many years ago) bemoaning the corruption of midst to mists
Aug
29
answered Lost in the Midst vs Mists of Time
Aug
29
awarded  Supporter
Aug
28
comment What do you call “one hundredth of a second”?
fair point... I was focussing on the quoted text, rather than the question :)
Aug
28
awarded  Editor