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visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Sep 20 '12 at 17:11

I am interested in Teaching English as a Foreign Language otherwise known as TEFL. I have studied a TESOL course (Teaching English as a Second Language).

The difference in the two abbreviations reveals some of the sensitivity around teaching English. One stands for Teaching English as a Foreign Language, and the other for Teaching English as a Second Language. A lot of learners are in English speaking countries and they are learning English as a second language.


Sep
20
comment Why the discrepancy between number and case in (some) British English?
Neither you nor I, tackled the question of whether saying 'foot' rather than 'feet' has deeper roots. I just thought it was dialect, but 'five foot' when discussing height is much more common than 'five feet'. I will be kind and give you one point as I do admire you.
Sep
20
comment “Feel free to hit me up” — “at”? “on”? “via”?
I have only come across this expression in American movies. Usually in the context 'some guy was hitting on me in the bus' in which the romantic proposal is received negatively. Rather like the older expression, 'that man was making a pass at me'. Why is it, women don't like it when men find them attractive? And, why do women dress in a way that encourages men to find them attractive?
Sep
20
comment What makes 'admix' different from 'mix'?
ɑkh ɑhɪm ɑkte wiz bɑɹsu:m May the Peace be with you as you venture forth to planets unknown.
Sep
20
comment What makes 'admix' different from 'mix'?
I have never come across the word admix or admixture. I can only assume that its use is very specialised - in other words - that it is a jargon word that is only used in special situations.
Sep
19
comment What's wrong with these sentences?
Even though your grammar skills are excellent, these examples are designed to catch you out.
Sep
19
comment Is there a single noun in English for 'jerry-rigged?'
Jerry Built meaning 'German Built'.
Sep
19
comment What is packaging tape called in the US?
Brown Tape: amazon.co.uk/s/…
Sep
19
comment Why the discrepancy between number and case in (some) British English?
@Barrie England Surely you have heard people use expressions like 'five foot' when they should say 'five feet'. Actually 'five foot is very commonly used. This is a song called six foot down: youtube.com/watch?v=OC1IAA4C5YY
Sep
19
comment What's the meaning of “joint winner”?
Of course I know what photofinish means.
Sep
19
comment What's the meaning of “joint winner”?
Yes it is, it is about two people winning together - a photofinish.
Sep
18
comment What does “Sautéed” mean in “Someone who has not sautéed in a subject”?
This is not such a bad answer. A clever columnist might have used a word that sounds like another word. The meaning is similar in many ways. I think this is interesting because it shows how the brain works when picking words.
Sep
17
comment What words should I use in replacement of lazy
If a man says that he is knackered, it means that he has no energy (no balls); a woman does not have any balls to start with.
Sep
15
comment What does the expression “for crying out loud” mean?
I think that the format should be more like the following: What is the origin of the colloquial term "bum"? QUESTION ...a homeless person ANSWER.
Sep
15
comment What does the expression “for crying out loud” mean?
I have had a look at ЯegDwight's answer to the following question "Here is a pointless question: What is the origin of the colloquial term "bum" meaning a homeless person?". ЯegDwight's answer is quite difficult to understand, I do not necessarily agree with it, and it is not the policy of the site.
Sep
15
comment What does the expression “for crying out loud” mean?
@By137 At first I could not understand your question. I then realised that it was both a question and an answer. You will find that this site provides a facility to ask a question, and then answer the question. Your answer is then among the answers to the question. So you are keeping to the question and answer format of the site. I did something like this with the word 'stack' used in the context of 'to stack an English Bulldog'.
Sep
15
comment What does the expression “for crying out loud” mean?
Even though I have gone to the trouble of answering this question, I think that it is unsuitable for a variety of reasons. First of all, it is not really a question. The person asking it, has found the answer. Ironically, the person asking it, has found the answer on this site. What the question does is draw attention to the use of euphemisms and 'minced oaths'. Minced oaths is an expression that I had not heard before.
Sep
14
comment Etymology of “ruggit”?
I have to add new bits as soon as they are deleted.
Sep
14
comment Word for getting service from friends/family unofficially
svjázi (связи) These words have slightly different meanings. When I look up связи I get 'connections', when I look up svjázi, I get Public Relations.
Sep
14
comment Word for getting service from friends/family unofficially
Yes, networking is an interesting word. There was a job advertised in the Scottish government in which the main requirement was 'skill in networking'. Another word is 'social climbing'. These words have positive and negative associations. The job description that required 'networking skills' caused a storm of protest because there is often an accusation of 'jobs for the bhoys' discuss.glasgowguide.co.uk/lofiversion/index.php/t24707.html ............ urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bhoys
Sep
14
comment Meaning of “drag” in “lights stretching across the main drag spelled…”
To describe the main street as the main drag is a common slang expression. "The primary commercial street in a smaller city." urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=drag