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visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Sep 20 '12 at 17:11

I am interested in Teaching English as a Foreign Language otherwise known as TEFL. I have studied a TESOL course (Teaching English as a Second Language).

The difference in the two abbreviations reveals some of the sensitivity around teaching English. One stands for Teaching English as a Foreign Language, and the other for Teaching English as a Second Language. A lot of learners are in English speaking countries and they are learning English as a second language.


Sep
4
revised If the conditions warrant
Anyone Speak Yiddish Here?
Sep
4
answered “For <xxx> sake” - which variant is more common?
Sep
4
comment If the conditions warrant
I think that I was struggling with the status of warrant as a verb or noun. Perhaps it similar to 'to prove' and 'proof'. I tried to use the word 'prove'because it was in the definition whereas justify has much more natural feel.
Sep
4
awarded  Critic
Sep
4
comment Meaning of “put on” in “the accuser can be put on the defensive”
My Auntie Gladys used to give men the 'Glad eye'.
Sep
4
comment Is “human resources” men?
I think that this is an opinion about large organisations and capitalism in general. Where men and women are units of production - inanimate objects. Again, it is interesting that someone with 2,097 points should get this wrong.
Sep
4
comment Is “human resources” men?
Dear Kris, You have got 8,367 points and yet you have clearly got this answer wrong. I think that where the confusion lies is that Human Resources (capital letters) is the name of a department within an organisation. This department used to be called the Personnel Department. Actually, this incident makes me think about my motivation. What is it? - a desire to help, power/authority, a mental exercise - I am not sure. The other thing is, I know I am right, but how can I convince you?
Sep
4
comment Is “human resources” men?
Human Resources are not an 'inanimate object' therefore it should be 'who'.
Sep
4
comment Is “human resources” men?
Human Resources are not an 'inanimate object' therefore it should be 'who'.
Sep
4
answered If the conditions warrant
Sep
4
answered Someone who forms their own opinion
Sep
4
answered Meaning of “put on” in “the accuser can be put on the defensive”
Sep
4
answered A word in Business terminology
Sep
3
comment When is it OK to use foreign words and phrases in everyday English?
I was trying to address the question of when it is OK to use foreign words and phrases in everyday English. I was starting to develop the idea that the use of foreign words can pass messages about identity. In a similar way to a masonic handshake.
Sep
3
answered Is “human resources” men?
Sep
3
comment When is it OK to use foreign words and phrases in everyday English?
Chow or should that be "ciao".
Sep
3
comment What does “Safety net in the coffin” mean?
The original article that Maureen Dowd picked up on was written by Dermot McEvoy. They both sound like Irish or Scottish names. O'Dowd is the surname of 'Boy George'. iamboygeorge.com
Sep
3
awarded  Commentator
Sep
3
asked When is it OK to use foreign words and phrases in everyday English?
Sep
3
comment Is “human resources” men?
@Huizhe I think you are being very generous. I did not think expressions like 'thingie noun' were permitted. Also this question could have been answered by simply looking up 'Human Resources'. What people have actually done is to use the question as a platform to air their political opinions. But you are right, this is an example of a question being answered in a helpful way. By the way, what is an 'OP' - OK (Original Poster).