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seen Sep 20 '12 at 17:11

I am interested in Teaching English as a Foreign Language otherwise known as TEFL. I have studied a TESOL course (Teaching English as a Second Language).

The difference in the two abbreviations reveals some of the sensitivity around teaching English. One stands for Teaching English as a Foreign Language, and the other for Teaching English as a Second Language. A lot of learners are in English speaking countries and they are learning English as a second language.


Sep
14
comment Meaning of “drag” in “lights stretching across the main drag spelled…”
To describe the main street as the main drag is a common slang expression. "The primary commercial street in a smaller city." urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=drag
Sep
14
comment “Caretaker” vs “Caregiver”
The word 'janitor' is used in Scotland in preference to 'caretaker'.
Sep
13
answered Canadian spelling: why?
Sep
13
answered “again” in “Today is the oldest you've ever been and the youngest you'll ever be again.”
Sep
5
answered “Do a shop” for “go shopping”
Sep
5
comment Is “human resources” men?
I could be generous and give you a point but I don't feel in the mood.
Sep
5
comment Does “Make for the hills” still hold currency as an idiom?
@MetaEd Often the most bitter arguments are when both people are right in different ways. Peace be with you.
Sep
5
revised Does “Make for the hills” still hold currency as an idiom?
added 428 characters in body
Sep
5
answered Does “Make for the hills” still hold currency as an idiom?
Sep
5
comment Does “Make for the hills” still hold currency as an idiom?
Possibly it the expression comes from when the British in India retreated to the hills to escape from the oppressive heat in the summer. "The hill stations are high-altitude towns, used especially by European colonialists, as a place of refuge from the summer heat." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_hill_stations_in_India
Sep
5
comment Does “Make for the hills” still hold currency as an idiom?
I basically think the answer is wrong - head for the hills - means; "Let's get the hell out of here!" It fits the context of the passage. Don't be an idiot like Paul Ryan and do something that will only damage your reputation and your sanity.
Sep
5
comment The revenge of the gifted amateur … be afraid, be very afraid …
I find it difficult to be objective and rational about a question that I have written. What sparked this question was a meta question: What is the role of non-experts on ELU? meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/3054/… I know that there are contributors who enjoy word play and I thought that this question would give them plenty of scope for their hobby.
Sep
5
comment The revenge of the gifted amateur … be afraid, be very afraid …
I saw this comment to one of my earlier questions: Amateurs and beginners don't usually know the limits, so they imagine bigger, fail more frequently, and learn more often. – cornbread ninja 4 mins ago
Sep
5
asked The revenge of the gifted amateur … be afraid, be very afraid …
Sep
5
comment I'm British, so should I take a rain cheque?
I would not have guessed that the 'check' part meant a metal token. I thought it simply meant that you weren't able to do what you wanted - a check on your activities - because of the rain: as in 'rained off' or 'rain stopped play'.
Sep
4
comment Meaning of “put on” in “the accuser can be put on the defensive”
@ Matt I have corrected my answer in the light of your comments.
Sep
4
revised Meaning of “put on” in “the accuser can be put on the defensive”
Corrections
Sep
4
revised Meaning of “put on” in “the accuser can be put on the defensive”
Corrections
Sep
4
revised If the conditions warrant
Anyone Speak Yiddish Here?
Sep
4
answered “For <xxx> sake” - which variant is more common?