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Dec
22
comment Is “to” missing in the following phrase: “civil liberties be damned”?
Good job, +1. :-) And your description of the forms of be is correct where mine wasn't quite.
Dec
21
comment Is “to” missing in the following phrase: “civil liberties be damned”?
I think you're on the right track, but... 1) the idea of a wish is only one use of the subjunctive mood, sometimes called the jussive subjunctive (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…;; and 2) you haven't fully explained the grammar: how is the subjunctive mood indicated? In your three examples, it's indicated by a form of the verb that differs from the indicative singular form for the 1st or 3rd person (using a form that is identical to the plural indicative form).
Dec
19
comment What does “Empedocles’ sandal” mean in terms of English usage?
I hadn't heard of Empedocles' sandal before either. It reminds me of the expression "smoking gun."
Nov
30
revised What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?
fixed English usage in Title
Nov
30
suggested approved edit on What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?
Nov
23
comment What is the American word for 'tea-towel'?
To me, dishcloth means the cloth used for washing the dishes. (I'm an American raised partly in Australia, FWIW.)
Nov
20
comment Is “denigrate” a racist word?
I think it's helpful to remember that the etymology of a word does not necessarily indicate its meaning. To claim that a word somehow mysteriously means X because it derived from a word meaning X is a form of the "genetic fallacy." "To denigrate someone" does not mean "to blacken that person." As shown in the M-W definition, the meaning (in today's English) has nothing to do with dark colors, let alone with dark-skinned races.
Sep
30
comment Do people pluralize “WiFi” with an “s”?
@curiousdannii, good point that Wi-Fi is commonly used as a noun (as terdon has now edited his answer to show). I only quibble with the statement that it has to be a definite noun. I think you're reacting to the fact that a Wi-Fi doesn't work. But this is not because a is indefinite; rather, because a requires a countable noun. As a counterexample, Did you find any Wi-Fi? is indefinite but sounds OK.
Aug
29
comment Where an ellipsis exists, is there a term for the missing text?
It still sounds like omission is used to refer to the act of omitting. But I could be wrong.
Aug
29
comment Where an ellipsis exists, is there a term for the missing text?
It really depends on what version or aspect of the question you're trying to answer: the one that asks what "..." is called? or the one that asks what the removed words are called? or the one (if there is one) that asks what the act of removing words is called?
Aug
29
comment Where an ellipsis exists, is there a term for the missing text?
I'm not sure which version of the question this is attempting to answer. If it's saying that "omission" means the words that were removed, as the current version of the question asks, that doesn't seem to be supported by the quotation given.
Aug
29
comment Where an ellipsis exists, is there a term for the missing text?
This quotation doesn't seem clearly to indicate that the missing text is called an omission; rather, it sounds like the action of removing text is referred to as an omission.
Aug
26
comment Dictionary of English word syllables and stresses
Strange that this was marked as a duplicate. The linked question doesn't ask about syllable or stress pattern specifically. It does mention pronunciation, but often pronunciation data doesn't include full information about syllables. And it was not clear from the answers which, if any, of the online resources mentioned included information on stress and syllable structure. I just added an answer there but maybe it belonged more to this question.
Aug
26
answered Where can I obtain an English dictionary with structured data?
Aug
26
comment Dictionary of English word syllables and stresses
Wiktionary doesn't consistently have pronunciation data; where it does, it doesn't consistently include syllable divisions.
Jul
29
comment Appropriate word for a young person who behaves like a cynical old person?
I don't see the repetition. I was appealing to more objective sources than our speculations about what the boy has done, and our differing personal feelings about what "jaded" means.
Jul
29
comment Appropriate word for a young person who behaves like a cynical old person?
I was going by the OP's statement, that the boy "would never have a Facebook or Twitter account," and therefore is inexperienced in such things. M-W's definitions of jaded include "by having done or experienced too much of something" and "by experience or by surfeit."
Jul
29
comment Appropriate word for a young person who behaves like a cynical old person?
Maybe, but to me, jaded is mainly about having lost pleasure in things that others enjoy, having experienced them to the point of boredom; whereas the described boy seems to dislike modern things for other reasons than having tried them a lot and become disillusioned. 'Jaded' also seems wholly negative, whereas this boy likes the things of yesteryear.
Jul
17
comment Hypernyms for directions
@FumbleFingers: I agree with the OP, from a math/engineering point of view, in a domain where there are two dimensions, it doesn't make much sense to say that "up" is not a vector just because its horizontal component is zero. In 3D graphics or robotics, "up" is pretty much always treated as a vector of 2 (or 3 or more) components, rather than as a different type of object from "up-left".
Jul
17
comment Hypernyms for directions
I like "cardinal" - it seems both discriminative and descriptive. "Intercardinal" may be discriminative but it's not intuitive. @OP, what about "cardinal" vs. "compound" directions?