439 reputation
28
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen yesterday

Jul
17
comment Hypernyms for directions
@FumbleFingers: I agree with the OP, from a math/engineering point of view, in a domain where there are two dimensions, it doesn't make much sense to say that "up" is not a vector just because its horizontal component is zero. In 3D graphics or robotics, "up" is pretty much always treated as a vector of 2 (or 3 or more) components, rather than as a different type of object from "up-left".
Jul
17
comment Hypernyms for directions
I like "cardinal" - it seems both discriminative and descriptive. "Intercardinal" may be discriminative but it's not intuitive. @OP, what about "cardinal" vs. "compound" directions?
Jul
17
comment Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?
P.S. As you once said (english.stackexchange.com/questions/96697/…), "if it cannot be easily demonstrated, then it may well not be true." ;-)
Jul
17
comment Why is there no “autumntime” or “falltime”?
+1, a thorough answer. I would only quibble with the statement "absence of evidence never constitutes evidence of absence," which I would amend to "absence of evidence is not necessarily evidence of absence." There are many cases (e.g. in experimental particle physics) where absence of evidence of a particular phenomenon where expected is interpreted as evidence of its absence, even if not as conclusive evidence by itself. See also en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evidence_of_absence
Jul
17
comment A person who criticizes his own homeland/city/country?
As an aside, "bite the hand that feeds you" is often used apart from a criticism/advice format, i.e. indicative rather than imperative: google.com/…
Jul
17
comment Which (if any) pedantically, grammatically, correct uses of the apostrophe will lead to a valid “NOUNs’s” construction?
+1. I would only add, can you clarify the first sentence (1st paragraph) to accommodate the first sentence of the 2nd paragraph? Did you mean "The only case where you might see s's in the plural is with names"?
Jul
17
comment Where did the expression “achievement unlocked” come from?
Andrey, thank you for asking this question. The mismatch between the normal usage of "unlock" and its meaning in regard to achievements confused me for a long time, and still bothers me. It seems to me that even in video games (except for achievements), "unlocking" something means that it becomes ready to be opened or accessed. I always wondered, "If these are my unlocked achievements, what do I need to do now to achieve them? And why are the others locked?" Maybe my question is more specific than yours: why does gaming use the word unlock for achieving an achievement?
Jul
8
awarded  Self-Learner
Jul
7
awarded  Yearling
Jul
7
revised What's the original meaning of “Abraxis”?
added 185 characters in body
Jul
7
revised What's the original meaning of “Abraxis”?
explained how the question arose
Jul
7
answered What's the original meaning of “Abraxis”?
Jul
7
asked What's the original meaning of “Abraxis”?
Jun
9
comment A single word name for the “I don't know” gesture
Does the gesture you're thinking of look the same as a "lip shrug"? See #1 at howtobeisraeli.blogspot.com/2009/12/… (This gesture may not be universal but it is recognizable to us Americans.)
Jun
9
comment A single word name for the “I don't know” gesture
@pingpongi, what country are you thinking of, where this gesture is used?
Jun
9
comment A single word name for the “I don't know” gesture
@JonHanna: To me, the cultural meaning of the pouting gesture (sulkiness) is so closely bound into the word 'pout' that if someone needed to communicate a lip movement signifying ignorance, I would feel like 'pout' was the wrong word. Even using it with modification, e.g. "He pouted to show his ignorance," would be very awkward and easily misunderstood.
Jun
9
comment A single word name for the “I don't know” gesture
@JohnLawler, while I agree that a pout doesn't indicate ignorance, I disagree with the suggestion that the lip is not involved in a "shrug" expression in Anglophone discourse. My American friends and family often, if not always, accompany the shoulder and eyebrow movement with a particular lip movement -- though not a pout, maybe more of a pursing expression. (There is also a hand movement, palms rotating upward, in the full expression.)
Dec
11
comment What does this double negative mean?
To say that the "papers suggest he was a victim" might be putting it too strongly; but at least the papers do not suggest he was a perpetrator, for example.
Dec
11
comment What's the origin of the idiom “bust one's chops”?
The OP is mainly asking about the origin of the meaning "to exert oneself."
Nov
27
comment Idioms that mean making decision between two good options
"A super car that's very expensive but you are not sure if you like it" - it's not clear how this is a good option. Are you looking for an idiom that means making a decision between two potentially good options but you're not sure whether they're actually good?