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Apr
7
comment Is there any English word in which “ph” is not pronounced as “f”?
@l0b0: I don't get it. shep, sheep, sheeep... what's the punchline?
Jan
19
comment Is there any English/American equivalent for the Hungarian phrase “beating the nettle with someone else's penis”?
When I have heard this phrase, it has always meant blaming something on (someone): using (someone) as a scapegoat.
Jan
16
comment What does “datum (sed) non concessum” mean?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Jan
15
comment What does “datum (sed) non concessum” mean?
@Robusto: A valid point (datum et concessum). Yet the comparison doesn't imply that a 9v battery is inadequate to power a smoke detector. Nor does "X is used way less than Y," by itself, establish that X is not English.
Jan
15
comment What does “datum (sed) non concessum” mean?
@choster: Thanks for your comment (answer). Do you have any references?
Jan
15
comment What does “datum (sed) non concessum” mean?
@Robusto: I included a cursory analysis of the Latin meaning of the phrase, as relevant background information, but my question is not about the Latin meaning. It's about the English meaning. Regarding your second sentence, can you be explicit about how objective measures of occurrence of datum (sed) non concessum establish that it is not an English phrase?
Jan
15
comment What does “datum (sed) non concessum” mean?
@Barmar: I thought that was odd too. Did it only recently start being used in English? Not even datum sed non concessum is in there.
Jan
15
revised What does “datum (sed) non concessum” mean?
added 477 characters in body; added 68 characters in body
Jan
15
comment What does “datum (sed) non concessum” mean?
@Robusto: I disagree... It is about Latin, and English. This phrase appears to be used in English just as "sina qua non" or "QED" are. Yes, it's Latin, as are many other English phrases. If you assert that the phrase is not well-known enough in English communication be counted as on-topic, please cite your data to support that assertion. I'll add mine to the question.
Jan
15
asked What does “datum (sed) non concessum” mean?
Jan
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
22
comment Is “to” missing in the following phrase: “civil liberties be damned”?
Good job, +1. :-) And your description of the forms of be is correct where mine wasn't quite.
Dec
21
comment Is “to” missing in the following phrase: “civil liberties be damned”?
I think you're on the right track, but... 1) the idea of a wish is only one use of the subjunctive mood, sometimes called the jussive subjunctive (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…;; and 2) you haven't fully explained the grammar: how is the subjunctive mood indicated? In your three examples, it's indicated by a form of the verb that differs from the indicative singular form for the 1st or 3rd person (using a form that is identical to the plural indicative form).
Dec
19
comment What does “Empedocles’ sandal” mean in terms of English usage?
I hadn't heard of Empedocles' sandal before either. It reminds me of the expression "smoking gun."
Nov
30
revised What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?
fixed English usage in Title
Nov
30
suggested approved edit on What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?
Nov
23
comment What is the American word for 'tea-towel'?
To me, dishcloth means the cloth used for washing the dishes. (I'm an American raised partly in Australia, FWIW.)
Nov
20
comment Is “denigrate” a racist word?
I think it's helpful to remember that the etymology of a word does not necessarily indicate its meaning. To claim that a word somehow mysteriously means X because it derived from a word meaning X is a form of the "genetic fallacy." "To denigrate someone" does not mean "to blacken that person." As shown in the M-W definition, the meaning (in today's English) has nothing to do with dark colors, let alone with dark-skinned races.
Sep
30
comment Do people pluralize “WiFi” with an “s”?
@curiousdannii, good point that Wi-Fi is commonly used as a noun (as terdon has now edited his answer to show). I only quibble with the statement that it has to be a definite noun. I think you're reacting to the fact that a Wi-Fi doesn't work. But this is not because a is indefinite; rather, because a requires a countable noun. As a counterexample, Did you find any Wi-Fi? is indefinite but sounds OK.