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seen Aug 26 at 7:54

Yes.


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awarded  Explainer
Aug
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comment Separating Clauses in Garden-path Sentences
Supercat, your problem is called lexical ambiguity. Your description is apt. Garden-path sentences and your example are both ambiguous; the source of the ambiguity differs. The former is a kind of structural/syntactic ambiguity.
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Enlightened
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awarded  Nice Answer
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awarded  Nice Question
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awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Revival
Aug
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comment Is this an example of extrapolation?
@ΜετάEd: Reading my earlier comments to you now, I think they come off as rude. I didn't mean them that way, so I apologize. My point is that I think it helps to see that we are able to complete the sentence because we recognize this form of joke already. No one else had or still has mentioned this necessary component, which is part of the known information. Completing the sentence requires fitting it to this pattern. I edited my answer because I think you were right that it had some distracting math stuff, so thanks.
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revised Is this an example of extrapolation?
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comment Is this an example of extrapolation?
I didn't talk about the mathematics of extrapolation. I only borrowed and greatly simplified the mathematical idea of a function because this is the whole core of an extrapolation. If you want to understand what is going on, you need to have this idea. Otherwise, you can only be told dogmatically what others think the right answer is. The definitions provided don't distinguish a prediction based on logic and one based on coin-flipping. You need to consider how the input and output are related, so you need to think about functions.
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revised Is this an example of extrapolation?
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Aug
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comment Is this an example of extrapolation?
How does simply stating that it is extrapolation or restating a definition helpful? It sounded like the OP was looking for an explanation of the reasoning involved, so I tried to explain this. My explanation does not apply only to mathematics. In mathematics, the criteria would be more precise and slightly different. I simply explained in more detail how the reasoning was working, and thought such an explanation called for a slightly mathematical treatment. Math is the perfect tool when you want to understand a phenomenon generally and precisely.
Aug
29
comment “Bad weather doesn't exist” vs. “The bad weather doesn't exist”
@Valentina: Bad weather will do what you want, but what about: there is no weather either good or bad but thinking makes it so? :^)
Aug
29
comment “Bad weather doesn't exist” vs. “The bad weather doesn't exist”
I would note that the reason for this difference is that the signals that its referent is already known (it's in the discourse). For how this works, see anaphora. Sans the, weather might be considered a natural kind term, such as water or lions, which refers to a whole class of objects or a typical member of this class. I am not personally sold on natural kinds, but you might find the theories enlightening.
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revised Is this an example of extrapolation?
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revised Is this an example of extrapolation?
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revised Is this an example of extrapolation?
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Aug
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answered Is this an example of extrapolation?