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Feb
2
comment How do I avoid misspelling “receive” as “recieve”?
The problem is that your question is not about the English language. You're not asking why the word is spelled this way or what its etymology is or anything like that. You're asking for a way to remember something and that is not on topic here since it really isn't related to language at all. Had you asked why the presence of a c makes a difference, that would have been very much on topic.
Jan
28
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
21
comment What is the idiom for a guy/situation who/where has his own shortcoming but still mocks others?
People who live in grass houses shouldn't stow thrones.
Jan
19
comment A word or idiom to replace “bromance” between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz
You're telling me that actual, card carrying, professional, paid journalists use that horrible, useless word (it's called friendship folks; that involves strong emotion, even when the friends in question are heterosexual males)? That's just depressing.
Jan
9
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
6
comment What is another word for a false belief or opinion on something that people hold true and repeat because they have heard it repeated so many times?
@requiem poor Daffy, everyone makes fun of his lisp.
Dec
18
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
14
comment What is the origin of the expression “to twig to something”?
@FumbleFingers yes, I'm not too bothered about the to, which is why I included the definition quoted. However, I've actually received at least one answer here which improved on the OED and another which quoted original research beyond what found on etymonline so I wouldn't rule it out. I am not looking for opinion here but for actual evidence one way or another. This is, after all, (also) a site for professional linguists so I hope one of them might have something to add.
Dec
14
asked What is the origin of the expression “to twig to something”?
Dec
14
reviewed Close Is it correct to use 'are' before 'something'?
Dec
13
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
11
revised How does capitalizing helps readers?
deleted 4 characters in body
Dec
9
revised sensible, sensitive, and sentient
added 2 characters in body
Dec
4
revised Is “evidence” countable?
added 42 characters in body
Dec
4
comment How to use the relative pronoun “which”
That sentence is a trainwreck. The which is the least of its problems.
Dec
4
revised How to use the relative pronoun “which”
added 1 character in body
Dec
1
comment Which is more wet: ‘moist’ or ‘damp’?
@Mari-LouA that's an interesting point. I think it warrants an answer. I also think I can find counter examples (with the possible exception of hair all the damp examples you gave carry a connotation of unpleasantness; even damp hair makes me think of leaving the house with wet hair as opposed to just having stepped out of the shower) but you raise a good point with internal vs external soaking.
Nov
30
comment Which is more wet: ‘moist’ or ‘damp’?
@R that is a curse moist vile.
Nov
24
comment What does whole-animal mean?
@FumbleFingers yes, and in blood, no doubt.
Nov
23
comment Why “out” in “eat your heart out”?
@Jim yes, off I can understand. It's the out that strikes me as strange.