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Jul
19
comment Is “Gone to Texas” a widespread idiom?
Draft dodging could be politically loaded and it's not really a generic idiom. I wouldn't use it in this context.
Jul
5
revised What to call the large containers of bottled water?
added 76 characters in body
Jul
5
comment What to call the large containers of bottled water?
@deadrat jug of water is what these are called.
Jul
5
comment What is it called when a highly respected person commits an immoral act but people don't believe that he committed the act?
This is not what the OP is asking for. Everyone believes these people did what they were accused of, but they did not receive negative repercussions (hence Teflon). The OP is asking more for things like Lance Armstrong before it was widely believed he used doping.
Jul
5
answered What to call the large containers of bottled water?
Jul
1
answered Is there an expression or idiom for something convenient that happens right when you need it to?
Mar
3
answered A word for support that is superficial, but not operational
Feb
11
comment “A cup of hot coffee” or “A hot cup of coffee”
"cup of hot coffee" feels ordinary to me. "hot cup of coffee" feels cozier.
Jan
14
comment Shorter version for “take into account”
-1 Most likely the UI element is an option that controls the behavior of a calculation and instructs it to either account for or not account for magnetic declination. In this scenario, "consider" is not appropriate.
Dec
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
29
awarded  Yearling
Oct
1
comment Is there a proper way of talking about a negative “privilege”?
In terms of keeping the irony, it's all in how you say it. Nonverbally you can also use something like "good misfortune" to carry a hint of irony.
Sep
30
answered is there a word for super general advice?
Sep
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
29
answered Is there a proper way of talking about a negative “privilege”?
Sep
29
comment Is there any “swearword” in English not associated with excrements, the genitals, sexual activity or religion?
The interesting thing about English is that it has no swear words that are associated with illnesses. Many other languages treat cancer, cholera, and so on as (parts of) bad words.
Sep
11
awarded  Necromancer
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
May
23
answered What is the counterpart to 'reply'?
Apr
16
comment Something of value that is worthless in the current context?
Golden handcuffs refer to being "trapped" in a position because there are significant positive financial incentives to stay there.