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  • 0 posts edited
  • 5 helpful flags
  • 19 votes cast
Apr
15
comment Are doggie bags still asked for?
And occasionally in the US you'll be offered a take-home box before you ever get to the restaurant!
Apr
15
comment Are doggie bags still asked for?
If the American accent and occasionally overbearing mannerisms don't give it away as US English first!
Apr
1
comment What do you call this elevated road structure?
The part in the middle is a bridge.
Apr
1
comment What do you call this elevated road structure?
None of those cities have flyovers! In U.S. English a flyover is an overpass that also passes over other overpasses. You generally see them only in complex highway interchanges. (But in British English, a flyover is a very long bridge passing over a road, usually parallel to it.)
Mar
27
comment What do we call 'Shakespearean trash-talk'?
@MartinBean If you've ever seen American pro wrestling, it's basically every word out of the wrestlers' mouths, and is very much part of the experience. In cricket it's strongly discouraged but happens anyway.
Mar
26
comment What do we call 'Shakespearean trash-talk'?
For you lost Britons who have no idea what this "trash talking" is, it's not talking rubbish. It's basically sledging, though not limited to cricket. It is what the Wealdstone Raider became famous for, for example.
Feb
18
comment Derogatory term for a corporate employee
You could be a hard working corporate slave.
Jan
28
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
24
awarded  Yearling
Nov
23
answered Word for a task which is flawed or doomed to failure but which you have to do anyway?
Nov
9
comment Is it pejorative to use “old girl” to refer to a woman?
This is pretty rare in American English. And, of course, there's always the danger inherent in calling any woman "old"....
Sep
29
comment Shoplifting vs. a word for “someone who orders, eats and sneaks without paying the check”
@Michael "Dishwasher"?
Sep
23
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Aug
31
comment Why does “smashing” mean “very good”?
I can't recall ever hearing this particular usage here in the U.S., though all of the other related ones noted in the incomplete answers below are in common use.
Jul
6
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
5
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
4
awarded  Scholar
Jul
4
accepted What do you call someone who shoots fireworks professionally?
Jul
4
awarded  Editor
Jul
4
awarded  Student