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Apr
20
comment “It calls itself”
I would not say this is a chiefly British usage. I’ve used it and heard it used often, and I am American; I’ve only so much as visited Britain once.
Apr
20
awarded  Talkative
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
@Dan I was referring to the phrase itself, not the phrase combined with this particular situation. Being twin to a bad person may have a negative connotation for you, but the phrase separated at birth only states that the two are similar: that might be a good thing!
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
@Dan Separated at birth may have negative connotations for whomever did the separating, but not for those who were separated. But even for the separator, a negative connotation is a stretch.
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
@FumbleFingers I have heard people, scenarios, and so on referred to as the lesser evil (in clear allusion to the lesser of two evils) fairly often, even when no choice is involved. But still, only useful if one truly is less evil—not the case here.
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
Huh, I wonder if President Coin will eventually see usage in this manner. Those books are certainly popular enough now, and the usage is quite apt. We’ll see how they fare with the test of time. Anyway, +1 for out of the frying pan and into the fire.
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
Great for the specific situation in the question, may not be as broadly applicable as the Iranian phrase. Still, great phrasing (and a great song), and it definitely does fit the specific example in the question, so +1.
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
The last is not negative, which should be pointed out. It literally just means two names for the same thing. The first two, though, are some of the better options here.
Apr
20
comment Any equivalent to this Persian proverb “The yellow dog is the jackal's brother”?
Tweedledee and Tweedledum are the only examples here that are even somewhat negative, but the negativity isn’t the same (or as strong) as in the example. Seems worth highlighting in the answer.
Apr
5
revised What is the meaning of using a past participle after 'of'?
avoid the use of code formatting for non-code; it causes problems with some screen-readers for the blind.
Apr
5
suggested approved edit on What is the meaning of using a past participle after 'of'?
Apr
5
comment What is the meaning of using a past participle after 'of'?
You should answer the question asked, or at the very least answer the question asked first, before adding extraneous information that you think the OP might want to also know.
Apr
5
comment What is the meaning of using a past participle after 'of'?
The question already brings up the expectation of a -ing form after of, rehashing “rules” that the OP is already familiar with is redundant, but more importantly misleading, because it suggests that there is something to the OP’s expectation here. There isn’t. Absolutely none of that explanation about -ing forms applies in any way to the example sentence, and having to read an entire page (and then some) before getting to “but none of that has anything to do with this example” is not a good answer.
Apr
5
comment What is the meaning of using a past participle after 'of'?
The entire first half of the answer has nothing to do with the example sentence, and is misleading, suggesting that the original post’s misparsing is accurate (it isn’t). The of and had underbid have nothing to do with one another, they are in separate clauses.
Mar
29
comment What is a term or idiom for “blah blah blah” talk?
I have never heard the phrase “trying to fill a 24-hour news cycle with 24 minutes of news,” but wow that’s a great one.
Mar
29
comment What is a term or idiom for “blah blah blah” talk?
On the other hand, bullshit doesn’t quite seem right to me. For one thing, bullshit is not necessarily mindless repetition of stock phrases; it can alternatively be very cunningly crafted deceptive, or at least obfuscating, statements.
Mar
29
comment What is a term or idiom for “blah blah blah” talk?
Seems to me that idle talk is used more for talk about idle or frivolous subjects, rather than being a way to talk about a subject which may not itself be idle at all.
Mar
29
comment What is a term or idiom for “blah blah blah” talk?
@Josh61 It might refer to that, but the word never means that—in the speaker’s opinion, it very much isn’t that (perhaps because the view and subject are not shared), and the word is being used to express the belief that the talk isn’t that.
Mar
23
comment Word to describe person who is rich in wealth, but is poor in class?
Yeah, never would have known or assumed the implicit wealth aspect here.