181 reputation
18
bio website
location New York, United States
age 26
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen yesterday

I'm an electrical engineering student with a computer science minor at the City College of New York. I do programming work for the Metropolitan Transit Authority, and do a fair amount of hobby-coding for web sites and computer game modifications.


Jul
13
comment What do you call money earned through unethical sources?
I agree that ill-gotten gains would be an odd choice to call money you didn't gain yourself through ill means. But I don't think anyone would find it odd to call money you got from a bank heist dirty money.
Jul
13
comment What do you call money earned through unethical sources?
I've never heard of dirty money as necessarily having previous criminal owners. Ill-gotten gains is certainly a good suggestion, but I don't think your distinction holds.
Jul
13
comment What do you call money earned through unethical sources?
Well, how about a suggestion for adding more to this answer: it's worth noting that the process of getting rid of dirty money to get money that is more safely usable is called money laundering, literally cleaning the money.
Jul
11
comment Are there English equivalents to a Japanese old saying, “Be the mouth of cock rather than remaining as the tail of ox”?
I've never heard the kotowaza-allguide sayings before either. Big fish in a little pond is massively more common.
Jul
8
answered Adjective to describe someone who is knowledgeable, resolute, and calm
Jul
7
comment Does an antonym of ''freezing'' as a descriptor of weather exist?
Definitely think "boiling" is the most common in my area of the US. I suspect the choice between "scorching" and "boiling" has a lot to do with the typical summer humidity in your climate: since I live, effectively, in a swamp, "boiling" comes to mind much quicker than "scorching" here, but when I lived in the desert, I imagine "scorching" would have been more likely.
Jun
30
comment How can I describe see-through clothing vision?
I like transvestial excepting that the combinations of trans and vesti in English tend to focus on the across definition of trans rather than the through definition.
Jun
20
answered Term for when someone gets overly pepped up and thinks he/she can do anything
Jun
20
comment Is “many fewer combinations” correct?
I'd be careful about significantly fewer in some contexts, since it may imply something about statistical significance, which both would require backing up, and also may not actually be a "lot" fewer, just enough fewer to be statistically significant (i.e. non-negligible).
Jun
16
awarded  Constituent
Jun
16
awarded  Caucus
Jun
14
comment Term to describe “revenge through sexual intercourse”?
This sounds like "you're pissed at [gender] so you treat your next [gender]friend badly," which is almost the opposite of what's being asked for. The behavior described is that you've been cheated on (or otherwise mistreated by a partner), so you're going to go have a lot of sex with other people to make your partner jealous"
May
30
comment A word or idiom for something that is real but appears fake
"Too good to be true" is used almost entirely to describe situations that are too good to be true.
May
22
comment What is the opposite of a monopoly?
I would never use this word without immediately defining it after using it.
May
22
comment What do you call someone who is always asking for favours?
"He doesn't seem to realise or, pretends not to, that there is a limit to asking for help or favours from other people," suggests to me that the friend is certainly capable of getting by without the favors. On the other hand, if I were to call someone dependent I'd be implying that they couldn't get by without assistance (i.e. they depend on me, or others). I was actually going to upvote this and not upvote other answers until I saw that line, but considering that line I think this answer doesn't quite fit.
May
22
comment What do you call someone who is always asking for favours?
@egrunin I have heard "mooch" used to refer to an enormous variety of things, not just money. In fact, I can't remember the last time I heard it about money, except in the indirect sense (e.g. always happy to accept a drink when someone buys a round, but never buys a round himself).
May
18
comment Direct object for the verb “imbue” that isn't on this list
@ElliottFrisch I guess, in addition to be too opinion-based, the question is also unclear. Whatever noun I choose, it needs to be one I can refer to and have everyone reading know I mean this system. Magic powers could also be any of the other ways to put magic on items.
May
18
comment Direct object for the verb “imbue” that isn't on this list
I like all these verbs, but I also liked the verb that I had, and the question was more about getting a noun to fill in those blanks.
May
18
comment Direct object for the verb “imbue” that isn't on this list
@ElliottFrisch I'm not sure what your suggestion there is. The term would be used outside that singular sentence, so restructuring the sentence to make it unnecessary doesn't help me. If you meant to suggest magic powers, there are far too many other ways to put magic on items in the game to claim that term globally.
May
17
comment Direct object for the verb “imbue” that isn't on this list
@WS2 Might just be a thing in fantasy literature and gaming, but I see it used in this sense quite often.