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 Yearling
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Apr
4
comment Is there a word that means deliberately ignorant, choosing to ignore?
"Willful ignorance" is a phrase I hear commonly to mean exactly this, but I've never heard "willful blindness."
Mar
4
comment A word for support that is superficial, but not operational
In English, moral support is a common phrase, and it certainly doesn’t mean very much, but it does have a connotation of a certain amount of sincerity and well-meaning, rather than a blatant attempt to get credit for supporting without having to actually do the work.
Mar
4
answered A word for support that is superficial, but not operational
Feb
23
answered Is there a word for lowering the importance of something by summarizing it?
Feb
18
comment Derogatory term for a corporate employee
Working stiff in my mind implies a blue-collar job, rather than the white-collar one implied by the question. And I usually hear it mostly used in a fairly positive light – for the person. An honest person doing an honest day’s work – but at a heartless and apathetic company. Much more derogatory towards the place of work than the person working there.
Feb
5
comment Word for someone who is “quietly reliable”
Alternatively, works if you're looking for a Biblical term, since the Gospels have Jesus say something quite similar to that about Peter (whose name comes from the Greek for rock, so it was also a pun)
Jan
26
comment One word for a man who feels vulnerable about his wife
To be blunt, protective seems too positive in connotation. The question explicitly requests something with a negative connotation. Consider making the negativity explicit by going with over-protective?
Jan
26
comment One word for a man who feels vulnerable about his wife
Paranoid is a good suggestion (I was going to add it myself if I didn’t see it listed), but this is a difficult answer to read. I think something may have gotten messed up when you copied this?
Jan
26
comment One word for a man who feels vulnerable about his wife
I would argue that while jealousy is an emotion, which comes and goes as other emotions do, when you describe someone as a jealous man you are not describing a man currently experiencing jealousy, but rather someone prone to doing so.
Dec
27
comment 911: nine one one vs. nine eleven
@AnthonyBurleigh Not a psychologist, but marrying one: chunking definitely seems to be used for any strategy that groups pieces of data together in a single unit to aid memorization and facilitate thought about the chunks. It's a pretty broad, high-level term that can cover a lot of specific strategies, it seems to me.
Nov
25
comment What is the name of this “yawning like” movement?
@DanBron In reality, that woman is posing, but that's getting away from the point of the image...
Nov
18
comment How can I describe a low temperature that doesn't actually feel cold?
@JanusBahsJacquet I would, and I’m from New York City. That’s T-shirt and sandals weather, as far as I’m concerned.
Nov
11
comment Why isn’t singular ‘they’ used with 3Sg verb forms?
I feel like you're missing a conclusion here. You lay out some evidence, and then do not draw an answer from it. “‘singular they’ is syntactically plural, and semantically singular [...] just like trousers,” sooo.... what? Which verb form should be used? You rely on the reader to supply the actual conclusion, presumably based on knowledge of which verb form is used with trousers.
Nov
8
awarded  Yearling
Oct
27
comment Please explain “I Am America (And So Can You!)”
@JK2 That would be known as the joke.
Oct
17
answered “To Obscure” Word
Sep
27
comment An English idiom for “solve a problem that has been solved”?
@FumbleFingers The Liberty Science Center in New Jersey had as an exhibit, many years ago, a "car" with square wheels, driven along a track of triangular sawteeth. Made for a very bumpy and difficult ride, but I suppose the traction was unsurpassed.
Sep
21
comment Not “On the Rocks”
You have a typo (missing the second 'c') in your hypertext for the cocktails.about.com link. The URL is find though, so the link works.
Aug
8
comment When/by whom was the computing use of “agnostic” to mean independent coined?
Well, the Ngram is interesting and answers half the question, so thank you for that, but it confuses me that it's buried under definitions I (more-or-less) already linked to and the link given as "Source" is not actually the link that gives the information asked for in the question.
Aug
7
awarded  Student