651 reputation
1410
bio website lac.u-psud.fr/…
location Paris, France
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Sep 29 at 9:51

Researcher in quantum information, mainly on cryptography.


Mar
22
awarded  Yearling
Mar
15
awarded  Famous Question
Jun
26
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
15
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
5
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
29
awarded  Yearling
Feb
21
accepted What is the difference between therefor and therefore?
Feb
20
asked What is the difference between therefor and therefore?
Nov
29
awarded  Yearling
Jul
20
answered Why do some English speakers pronounce “fête” as “fate”?
Jul
20
comment Why do some English speakers pronounce “fête” as “fate”?
It is /fɛt/ in French, and clearly not /fet/ (see fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/f%C3%AAte). As a French, I'm used native English speakers pronounce French /ɛ/ as /eɪ/ both in loanwards and when they speak French. It's part of the English accent to me.
May
23
answered How is a' in mathematics pronounced?
May
15
awarded  Nice Answer
May
15
revised Any reference on the usage of a backtick and single quotation mark like `this'?
Correct the apostrophe (!) : I wrote Alice's instead of Alice’s
Apr
4
revised When is creating punctuation appropriate?
added 65 characters in body
Mar
31
awarded  Commentator
Mar
31
comment Any reference on the usage of a backtick and single quotation mark like `this'?
@Jon Purdy: 1. " is not unaltered but replaced by in the output. 2. The reason of this use is that TeX uses (mainly) a ASCII input, where '"` are defined while “”‘’ are not ASCII characters
Mar
31
revised When is creating punctuation appropriate?
Edit 2 to add : italics.
Mar
31
comment When is creating punctuation appropriate?
@tenfour: I'd naturally tend to agree with you, but the fact that irony punctuation keeps being proposed and/or used from 16th to 21st century tends to show persons feels the need, from ⸮ to ;-). I feel it is mainly used in place where one would put a special intonation while speaking the same sentence to mark the irony, similarly to what happens with ! and ?. If you like to speak ironic discourses with a straight face, then, obviously, you don't need any ironic punctuation.
Mar
30
comment Was the “Ye Olde Shoppe” ever used or is it just an ancient-looking construct of modern times?
The transition from Þe to ye is described in Wikipedia's thorn article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thorn_%28letter%29 . The transition took several centuries, with an intermediate step where the thorn Þ looked like the already obsolete wynn (ƿ), before being undistinguishable from a y. By the way, Wikipedia also has a 'Ye olde' article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ye_Olde which could qualify as an answer to this question.