165 reputation
8
bio website
location Stockholm, Sweden
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Mar 18 at 22:53

Oct
26
comment Are synonyms always bidirectional?
@Izkata: Maybe they should ;-)
Oct
26
comment Are synonyms always bidirectional?
Perfect synonyms applies to all cases describing an absolute condition. You either are x or not x. Extending your example: Words related to being pregnant/expecting/gestating/knocked-up.
Jan
28
comment When to write the word “parenthetically”
Your last sentence eloquently refutes your second sentence. :-)
Dec
15
comment What's the term describing employer-employee and similar role relations?
Possibly, but the problem I find with hierarchy is that it requires some kind of chain-of-command, or subservience relation. Take doctor-patient for instance. Where's the hierarchy? Who's the boss? The doctor that prescribes a treatment, or the patient that buys a service?
Dec
15
comment What's the term describing employer-employee and similar role relations?
The complement to teacher is student. Sounds pretty good.
Dec
15
comment Looking for a certain word
Most answers here don't seem to address the actual question – what the person advocating such an approach is called.
Nov
8
comment Is there a word for a change so small that it doesn’t seem to be a change at all?
@tajmo: You got it. It's a tongue-in-cheek usage.
Nov
4
comment Is there a word for a change so small that it doesn’t seem to be a change at all?
@tajmo: I won't go there in this forum, but I'd recommend you try out our sister site skeptics.stackexchange.com.
Oct
12
comment Is there a word for a change so small that it doesn’t seem to be a change at all?
@tajmo: Originally, yes. Now it have come to mean either infinitesimal, minuscule, negligible, imperceptible, indiscernible, inconsequential, insignificant, immaterial, immeasurable, inefficient, impotent or inactive. ;-)
Jul
1
comment What is a word that means “belief in the good nature of humankind”?
Or naïve perhaps? ;-)
Jun
30
comment What is the difference between “quicker” and “faster”?
@John Y: I thought it tasted a bit wrong. A short duration makes sense, while a short time not really that much.
Jun
28
comment What is the difference between “quicker” and “faster”?
What about "shortest time"? Wouldn't that be even more accurate?