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3h
comment What languages did these words come from?
You may find this information in any dictionary, or at etymonline.com
1d
comment Jesus said,“I am coming soon”. Is there a Shakespearian meaning of the term,“soon”?
What's Shakespeare got to do with it?
May
2
comment Is it correct to use this phrase: “Strike up the new way of entertainment”?
Can you give an example of "strike up" with a verb?
Apr
30
comment “If a son strike his father” - shouldn't it be “strikes”?
@WS2 Oh, yah, it's perfectly grammatical; but do you really hear it in everyday speech?
Apr
30
comment “If a son strike his father” - shouldn't it be “strikes”?
@PeterShor Subjunctive means different things to different analysts. Is it a property of the verb or of the clause? I think few modern grammarians would support the notion of distinct subjunctive forms such as are found in German or French, but some recognize subjunctive contexts which 'select' a distinct repertoire of verbforms and constructions. It's basically the same problem we encounter when we try to count English 'tenses'.
Apr
30
comment “If a son strike his father” - shouldn't it be “strikes”?
@WS2 A mandative is a command, demand, desire: We order that the defendant be discharged. I don't think I've ever encountered a 'present subjunctive' (=uninflected plain form) employed as a conditional in ordinary contemporary speech, only in literary contexts and quotations: "If this be treason, make the most of it."
Apr
30
comment How is the word 'but' used in the famous quote 'What is life but a series of inspired follies?'
I implore you: plain 'Bernard Shaw'. He never used the 'George'.
Apr
30
comment “If a son strike his father” - shouldn't it be “strikes”?
@WS2 If I were you is the 'past subjunctive', which is indeed still common. If a son strike is the 'present subjunctive', which has virtually disappeared except in mandatives.
Apr
28
comment Why isn't “for one reason only…” the same as “this does not resolve the problem”?
This is question with no good answer, because the underlying text is poorly written. I hope nothing important hinges on it. ... You probably feel that the 'does not resolve' sentence belongs before the 'hungry' sentence, which defines "the root of the problem", and that's pretty reasonable. On the other hand, it's just as reasonable to feel that it's the 'shooting' which fails to resolve the problem. If it wuz me, I'd put the 'does not resolve' sentence at the 4 position and then move the 'hungry' sentence after that; but the test doesn't give us that option. Bad test design.
Apr
27
comment Plural of The Letter S
In Shaw's 'The Dark Lady of the Sonnets' Queen Elizabeth I characterizes the phrase "season your admiration for a space" as "a very vile jingle of esses".
Apr
27
comment Is it considered plagiarism to not place quotation marks following a copied sentence if there are footnotes to indicate the source?
If you are paraphrasing an author, you don't use quotation marks. If you use the author's actual words you must use quotation marks to distinguish what words are the author's and what are yours.
Apr
26
answered Need help understanding Intransitive Verbs in these sentences
Apr
26
answered Need help understanding Intransitive Verbs in these sentences
Apr
26
comment How is this statement incorrect? or Is it correct?
@DanBron One of the most interesting things about both these sites is the different errors which different respondents discern in ill-formed texts. It's often very difficult for me to get past my presuppositions and recognize just what misunderstanding has created the error.
Apr
26
comment How is this statement incorrect? or Is it correct?
@DanBron Eh? There seems to be an article missing -- "... has not taken a bribe" -- but what plural "antecedent" does bribe take? What "antecedent" is any noun required to take?
Apr
26
comment Ambiguity in sentence: retrieving a document marked as relevant by pure chance
... a document marked by pure chance as relevant ...
Apr
26
comment What is the meaning of “to dance jam bone”
@deadrat Remember Hamlet, who says that old men have " a plentiful lack of wit, together with most weak hams"! Prof. Stroud, in fact, employed a much more sweeping gesture, striking the backs of his thighs on the way to striking his chest.
Apr
26
comment What is the meaning of “to dance jam bone”
@deadrat Jambon indeed means ham; but the word derives from the body part, and like hams in English, les jambons is used in French for the thighs.
Apr
26
revised What is the meaning of “to dance jam bone”
edited body
Apr
25
revised What is the meaning of “to dance jam bone”
added 44 characters in body