33,695 reputation
345108
bio website
location St. Louis, MO
age 66
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen 20 mins ago

A commercial writer for 20 years, a theatre guy for 30 years before that, once a drummer - until I heard Joe Morello.


14m
comment Expression for “Respect them and suspect them”
+1 But I believe he attributed to "an old Russian proverb".
18m
answered What is the meaning of “not” in “as often as not” and “as likely as not”?
1d
answered “There” as an adverb
1d
awarded  Good Answer
1d
revised What is the opposite of an Epiphany?
added 1 character in body
1d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
answered What is the opposite of an Epiphany?
2d
comment Decline of Perfect Tense in American English and Spanish related?
@PeterShor I have never encountered 'had got' to mean 'had' (it is colloquially used for = 'acquired', with 'got' as an alternate pappl, as in BrE), and I've actually been listening for it for a couple years now.
2d
comment Decline of Perfect Tense in American English and Spanish related?
@FumbleFingers Most of the decline seems to be in past and infinitive perfects; present perfects are more stable, but American preference for preterites is gaining some ground on your side of the pond. Here's a study, with some account of previous studies.
2d
comment Decline of Perfect Tense in American English and Spanish related?
@FUmbleFingers In fact there have been several corpus studies. They vary in scope and to some extent details of findings; but they agree that use of perfects is declining in both AmE and BrE, and that although AmE use of perfects generally has been and is significantly lower than BrE use, BrE use is currently falling more rapidly than AmE: the gap is closing.
2d
comment Decline of Perfect Tense in American English and Spanish related?
@WS2 No, I've not expressed myself clearly. Have got is not a perfect in AmE, where it originated - it is only an inseparable lexical expression = "have", and it is employed only in the present: "he/she/it has got" "everybody else have got"
Jul
28
comment Decline of Perfect Tense in American English and Spanish related?
@WS2 That is true in BrE, but not AmE. Our pappl is 'gotten', and for 'have acquired' we say 'have gotten'.
Jul
28
comment Decline of Perfect Tense in American English and Spanish related?
@PeterShor But have got is not a perfect, which in AmE would be have gotten
Jul
28
answered Appropriate word for a young person who behaves like a cynical old person?
Jul
26
answered Do “in a black study” and “in a brown study” mean the same?
Jul
26
comment What does “Our climate is indisposed to favour us even this once” mean?
@blackbirdfly13 A) Your informant is wrong; even this once is somewhat colloquial, but it is acceptable in most 'higher' registers, too. B) 1) put it clearly. 2) You confuse their (possessive of they) with there (dummy pronoun, as in "There is not the meaning", and "There must be"). "
Jul
26
comment What does “Our climate is indisposed to favour us even this once” mean?
@blackbirdfly13 Oh, no, it's ordinary English idiom = "even on this single occasion". It's our anniversary. Did I get flowers? Of course not. John never gives me flowers, even this once. Bastard.
Jul
26
answered Pres. perfect + going to + past infinitive
Jul
26
comment What does “Our climate is indisposed to favour us even this once” mean?
I envy you. I can read Chekhov only in translation - and the translations are so varied that I have to guess what he actually wrote.
Jul
26
answered What does “Our climate is indisposed to favour us even this once” mean?