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10h
comment Official Meeting invite
Invite as a noun is still very slangy in Anglo English; use invitation. And discuss is a transitive verb: we discuss a topic, not ∗discuss on a topic. I don't understand what you intend by parking sometime; this is not Anglo English idiom.
14h
comment the idiomatic use of “no more than” and “no less than”
No here is employed as it ordinarily is, as a quantifier: compare little more than, few more than, ten more than, much more than, many more than. It alternates with not, because no is semantically equivalent to not any. But quantifiers and the negator behave differently syntactically: the negator can be raised (I don't have any more than...), quantifiers cannot.
21h
comment Reported speech with changing time expression
@Jjangeu I've added some stuff.
21h
revised Reported speech with changing time expression
added 849 characters in body
21h
comment Reported speech with changing time expression
Utterance time is when the speaker speaks. Reference time is the time he is talking about. In 2 I am reporting John's utterance--the actual words he spoke. "Next week" is part of John's utterance, not mine, so it refers to the week after his utterance time, not mine. In 4 I am reporting the substance of John's utterance, not his actual words, so the entire sentence is my utterance, not John's. My utterance time is now, my reference time is the time when John spoke, and the week I mention is the week after my reference time; I cannot use next week; I have to say the next week.
22h
answered Reported speech with changing time expression
1d
comment How should I call “summer prepared” for a car?
It's very useful, a summarized car. You can fold it up and put it in your pocket and don't have to worry about parking. :)
1d
comment Term for referring to someone with mediocre words to describe their greatness
Meiosis. Your second one is litotes.
1d
comment i'd like to know some expression used at a photocopy shop
"Can I have five copies, please"
1d
comment Identifying the sentence structure. Is this sentence a compound sentence?
It's a complex sentence with a 'compound' (conjunct) predicate in the complement clause and a PP supplement modifying the subject. Compare "Roger, with Don, begged him to sit down and shut up."
2d
comment Missing words after commas in these sentences?
StackExchange disapproves of cross-posting to multiple SE sites; please avoid this in the future.
Jul
29
comment Is “fish” starting to be treated as countable?
Fish has always been countable ("I caught a fish"), although it can also be employed as an uncountable ("I had fish for dinner"). You are probably confused by the fact that it has the same form in singular and plural ("I caught three fish yesterday"), except occasionally when you are referring to different varieties of fish.
Jul
29
comment I did not saw him. Is this correct; if not, why not?
You should have only one tensed verb in a string, and that one the first. Did carries the tense; it is followed by the infinitive, see. I did not see him.
Jul
29
comment What is Andy Burnham's accent? Is it Liverpool, Manchester or elsewhere?
Oh, I haven't hit anything on the head--just plucked the needle from the Google haystack!
Jul
28
comment What is Andy Burnham's accent? Is it Liverpool, Manchester or elsewhere?
And a poster here says "he was born in Aintree but his family moved out to Lowton, which is a new housing development in between Leigh and Warrington - its in the Leigh constituency - so in fact he did return to the seat where he was a teenager. Its actually why his accent isn't really 'Scouse' but more typical of his constituency." All these folks seem to hear the same difference you do.
Jul
28
comment What is Andy Burnham's accent? Is it Liverpool, Manchester or elsewhere?
A poster on this forum who who appears to be from Liverpool himself sneers at London journalists who "think he's a scouser despite his Culcheth accent". And a poster here remarks that "He isn't a Scouser. He's from Culceth. Which is like saying Alderley Edge is Salford." . . .
Jul
28
comment What is Andy Burnham's accent? Is it Liverpool, Manchester or elsewhere?
According to his Wikipedia biography, Burnham was brought up and educated about halfway between Liverpool and Manchester.
Jul
28
answered present simple and adding s after the Sentence
Jul
28
comment Right Good but Left Bad
The political sense of left and right is historical accident: it referred originally to the physical locations where the factions clustered in the French National Assembly of 1789 and thereafter. Leftists regard right-wingers with loathing, and vice versa.
Jul
28
revised What tense to use in a when/if clause?
added 10 characters in body