Reputation
47,137
Next tag badge:
96/100 score
26/20 answers
Badges
3 63 140
Newest
 Guru
Impact
~2.2m people reached

1d
comment What is potass?
It's basically a whiskey-and-soda: "Seltzer water and club soda are very similar, but there is a notable difference between the two. Unlike seltzer, mineral-like ingredients are added to club soda to enhance the flavor. If you look on the list of ingredients, you'll likely see potassium bicarbonate and potassium sulfate listed." --Huffington Post
2d
revised “accounts for up to” vs “is gained from”
added 543 characters in body
2d
revised “accounts for up to” vs “is gained from”
added 31 characters in body
2d
answered “accounts for up to” vs “is gained from”
Feb
4
comment When to use ''of''?
There's no call for of here: enclose is not a noun but a verb, complement of who may at the beginning of the poem, nothingness is its object, and in words is a predicative complement: "Who may enclose nothingness in words?"
Feb
2
comment Interjection made in mockery to make someone jealous
That would make a nice master's thesis for somebody. And oh, yes, where I come from the rhythm was 6/8: crotchet quaver crotchet quaver dotted-crotchet dotted-crotchet.
Feb
1
comment Interjection made in mockery to make someone jealous
In my part of the US it was usually six syllables /'nænᵻ'nænᵻ'næ'næ/, with the tones in the interval relationships G G E A G E. I've also seen versions from other parts of the country written "neener neener neener".
Feb
1
comment What does the 'pps' mean in “Beowulf, pps. 29-49”
pps. is actually non-standard; ordinarily p. is "page" and pp. is "pages". The convention is to double the last letter of one of these abbreviations to get a plural: *pp*='pages', *ll*='lines', *vv*='verses', *chh*='chapters', and so forth.
Jan
31
comment Is Nabokov's Pale Fire really in iambic pentameter?
Only the most mechanical English iambic pentameter is written in strict form: the poet's art lies in the tension between the nominal five 'feet' and the actual four primary stresses. Northrop Frye has a very fine treatment here.
Jan
30
comment “… a risk that it exists or will exist” - Sentence Wording
I'd be happier if there were a comma after circumstance and after result; but I think you've got this right. I'm deleting my answer.
Jan
30
comment Is that the correct use of past perfect?
@Afsane The past perfect had come forces us to understand did as a realis past--you don't know whether it actually happened or not, but it is defintely possible that it happened. That makes the would unlikely UNLESS you're using it in a habitual sense: "Every time he left here, if he did what he had come here to do, he would go home; but if he didn't do what he had come here to do, he would go somewhere else."
Jan
29
comment Is that the correct use of past perfect?
The contraction spelled 'd a = "would have". If he had done &c., he would have come home. -- Both employ the 'perfect' form to express past irrealis.
Jan
29
comment English Idiom 'cut the apple in half'
This is not an established English figure, though if you used it you would probably be understood. The English figure that springs to my mind is "Let's split the difference".
Jan
29
answered Ridpath's Boethius translation
Jan
28
answered The meaning of “biting economic sanctions”
Jan
23
comment What verbs can you use in a sentence “The movie ”Boyhood“ runs for three hours”?
It lasts three hours.
Jan
22
comment Why is it “description” but “describe” (b and p)?
Seems to me that it's pretty standard in L for a voiced stop to devoice or assimilate before a voiceless stop: agere/actum, ad+tangere>attingere, ad+parere>apparere, ad+capere>accipere
Jan
22
comment Can the choice between Present Perfect vs Past Simple be influenced by external events?
@michael_timofeev There was a lot of discussion in the 1980s about this point (and related ones) under the rubric of the 'Present Perfect Puzzle'. The usual test utterance was "Einstein has visited Princeton"; the consensus was that this is only acceptable in situations where the statement was not about Einstein but about Princeton, equivalent to "Princeton has been visited by Einstein".
Jan
22
answered Can the choice between Present Perfect vs Past Simple be influenced by external events?
Jan
21
comment Can dramatic irony function retrospectively?
Hokey-dokey ... but then you also have to factor in matters of genre and the audience's generic sophistication. Just for instance, I betcha three quarters of the people who read Harry Potter as it came out "knew" by the end of book 2 that Snape was going to have a heroic role to play in the end.