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location St. Louis, MO
age 66
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 4 hours ago

A commercial writer for 20 years, a theatre guy for 30 years before that, once a drummer - until I heard Joe Morello.


1d
comment Releasatory? Releaseful?
+1 The term is particularly associated with art because this figurative use of the original medical sense derives from Aristotle's use in the Poetics.
2d
comment “So shouldn't you”?
Or "neither should you".
2d
comment Effect of English Language & Usage Stack?
It's negative. The more questions we answer, the more questions come in.
2d
comment Less formal synonym for “Confirmed”, “Acknowledged”
Gotcha? Ok? Hokey-dokey? kthxbi?
Nov
24
answered “in danger”: an adverb or an adjective?
Nov
24
comment Meaning of the phrase 'out upon it'
That's Early Modern English, ca. 1596, not 'mediaeval' English.
Nov
23
comment Is “the best thing since sliced bread” supposed to be taken sarcastically?
@Drew My guess is that such slicers did not exist. Users of the Rohwedder slicer had to combat considerable pushback from colleagues who said presliced bread would go stale too quickly (one of the reasons Rohwedder incorporated a wrapping process, too), which suggests that bakers were not at that time using such a thing. And the long time it took for Rohwedder to develop and capitalize his invention suggests that he had no existing model. The slicers which did exist appear to have been designed to remove one slice at time, like the meat slicers modern delis use.
Nov
23
revised Is “the best thing since sliced bread” supposed to be taken sarcastically?
added 677 characters in body
Nov
23
revised Is “the best thing since sliced bread” supposed to be taken sarcastically?
added 4039 characters in body
Nov
23
comment Is “the best thing since sliced bread” supposed to be taken sarcastically?
@Drew I have attempted to address your very reasonable objection.
Nov
23
answered Is “the best thing since sliced bread” supposed to be taken sarcastically?
Nov
22
comment How to appropriately use the word “baby” as in the pattern “ ____ baby ___”; for example, “run baby run”?
@TRomano Or dude ..
Nov
22
comment Notarial Deed Translation from Canadian English
I think what is described here is a property being transferred, 'with a building &c', rather than a document; the 'deed' is mentioned only as the governing authority for the 'servitude' to which the property is subject.
Nov
22
answered Notarial Deed Translation from Canadian English
Nov
22
answered How to appropriately use the word “baby” as in the pattern “ ____ baby ___”; for example, “run baby run”?
Nov
22
comment Notarial Deed Translation from Canadian English
That is a clausal adjunct, not a sentence. Could you provide more context, please? That will make it easier to explain how this relates to the sentence of which it is a part.
Nov
22
comment Quote: nearly impossible for artists to critique themselves well?
Shaw, asked what his Heartbreak House meant, answered 'How should I know? I am only the author.'
Nov
22
answered Is it required to use “that” here?
Nov
22
revised Should/can the idioms “on the one hand” and “on the other hand” both support the main issue
added 135 characters in body
Nov
22
comment Should/can the idioms “on the one hand” and “on the other hand” both support the main issue
@crokusek I think that a very fair comment, and I will add a line to that effect in my answer.