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1h
comment Using “of” in describing something
@Centaurus That would be fine; the referent of that would be an image, so it amounts to the same thing.
2h
answered Using “of” in describing something
14h
comment “He cooked me a soup with a lot of hot oil”
Or "This person put me right in the soup."
14h
comment Indian English: Is this a correct sentence?
If what you mean is "Is this Indian English correct in Standard (Atlantic) English?" then, No: you want until instead of when and, as John Lawler says, her instead of their.
16h
comment bleed inside out/got-have got
1) We say "I'm bleeding on the inside". 2) I got may be, as in your example, a colloquial shortening of I have got; it should not be employed in formal writing. 3) The first-person singular pronoun is always capitalized, I, in formal writing; the requirement is waived only for Famous Poets.
16h
comment Is a dark polka dot necktie dark?
The distinction between what we now call adjectives and nouns can be pretty artificial; the Romans distinguished 'adjective nouns' and 'substantive nouns' on the basis of syntactical role, and adjectives were only forked off as a separate word-class in the 18th century.
16h
comment Is there a word for wanting bad things to happen to others?
Malevolence means literally "wishing evil" upon someone, though it's also (and perhaps more often) employed to mean "enacting evil" upon someone.
1d
comment The past perfect without a simple past time clause. “I had eaten the day before.”
EDIT 1: Exactly right
1d
comment The past perfect without a simple past time clause. “I had eaten the day before.”
There's got to be something somewhere in the discourse that pins down the 'Reference Time' before which the past perfect eventuality occurred, but it doesn't have to be in the same sentence.
1d
answered Why does the meaning of a root sound different than the root?
2d
comment Subtrahendum/Subtrahenda
@BrianHitchcock Then you might see extractions as properly differenced from extracts.
2d
comment Subtrahendum/Subtrahenda
@BrianHitchcock Incidentally, here is an instance of subtraction used in a scholarly work in the sense I put forward.
2d
comment Subtrahendum/Subtrahenda
@BrianHitchcock Not inventing a new meaning--employing an everyday extension of sense, which does not appear in the dictionary simply because nobody has ever needed it. Dictionaries don't authorize meanings, they record them. And apparently you need not worry about what the word means to anybody but yourself! ... But you can still use the Latin pappl subtracta -- though I would incline more toward extracta -- which you can with plenty of precedent English as either extractions or extracts.
May
24
comment Defintion of Gilead in The Handmaid's Tale
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's LitCrit.
May
24
comment Defintion of Gilead in The Handmaid's Tale
This is a very complicated (and very cunning) literary allusion, and explaining that sort of thing is explicitly off-topic here. The Gileadites themselves employ one symbolism, Atwood quite another. Check out Genesis 37:25; Numbers chapter 32; Judges chapters 10-12 and 21; 2 Samuel chapters 2 and 17; and especially Jeremiah chapter 8. The ‘balm’ or ointment mentioned in the last has become a stock symbol of anointing both to heal and to confer power.
May
24
comment Etymology of 'inexorable' : What does 'out' + 'pray' mean?
Pray = "entreat" (e.g."beg" someone [to give or do something). Prevail upon = "Persuade" someone (to give or do something)--typically by entreaty.
May
24
comment Where have you been for your last vacation?
You are quite right. The present perfect is a present tense, so it may not be used, as it is in the book's first question, with time expressions which do not include the present. The second question, and both answers, might be acceptable in other contexts, but not in the context established at the beginning of this conversation. --
May
23
comment Is there a synonym for Thanks?
'Preciate it, man.
May
23
comment Subtrahendum/Subtrahenda
@Mitch I still can't shake off 7th grade Latin. A better name, though I'd be happier calling it something like an unfulfilled passive ppl, since it represents something which at reference time ought to be done or is expected to be done.
May
23
revised Subtrahendum/Subtrahenda
added 109 characters in body