1,919 reputation
512
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years
seen yesterday

I'm a Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science major.


Aug
17
answered Implied meaning of “patriotism”
Aug
17
accepted Does “allegedly made a drug that does X” or “made a drug that allegedly does X” sound better?
Aug
17
comment Does “allegedly made a drug that does X” or “made a drug that allegedly does X” sound better?
While the paths are different, would you regard the state of the solution as comparable? Would you consider "allegedly a drug exists that does X" and "a drug exists that allegedly does X" to mean X is just as likely/extant in both circumstances?
Aug
17
comment Does “allegedly made a drug that does X” or “made a drug that allegedly does X” sound better?
It prompted something almost describable as a philosophical question.
Aug
17
comment Does “allegedly made a drug that does X” or “made a drug that allegedly does X” sound better?
Oh, I totally agree that it's certainly real and almost certainly exactly as cool as they promise. I was asking a phrasing question.
Aug
16
comment Does “allegedly made a drug that does X” or “made a drug that allegedly does X” sound better?
They come to the same thing, though! In one, you're alleging they made a drug with certain properties, and in the other, you're claiming they made a drug and then alleging that it has those certain properties.
Aug
16
answered How to avoid ambiguous wording: “Each has the same number of each type of flower”
Aug
16
asked Does “allegedly made a drug that does X” or “made a drug that allegedly does X” sound better?
Aug
15
comment How to pronounce “linearly”?
@nohat while that may be the convention, a lot of Bostonians I know would have pronounced it "cah" under those circumstances, without a doubt. Further, I think it's good form to not get it confused with the word lineal, which it undoubtedly would without the 'r' sound.
Aug
15
comment Which nouns can be used as verbs?
A pretty cool novel that deals with the creation of new words (and overcoming 'blocking') is Frindle, by Andrew Clements. It's certainly aimed at kids and is by no means an academic piece or other authority on the subject, but the ideas are there. Interestingly, the book very explicitly plays the teacher, Mrs. Granger, as a benevolent anthropomorphism of blocking. Also, obviously lots of new words are made to fill a niche. Somewhat less obviously, the "this word isn't used by your parents" niche is very powerful.
Aug
15
comment Term for disrespecting people with lower social condition
@Mitch while that's true (and made me snicker), he was looking for something more specific. A hypothetical person would also be 'kind of a jerk' if they threw small animals at blind people, but might not be snobbish, elitist, etc.
Aug
15
comment How to pronounce “linearly”?
It's only LI-nee-uh-li if you pahk yah cah in Hahvahd yahd.
Aug
14
answered what do you say when someone is at your door?
Aug
14
comment “You both ordered drinks” or“ You both ordered a drink”
I actually like your conclusion better than either option the OP offered. Not sure I agree with you on "Both ordered a drink" being ambiguous, though. I would find ambiguity in "Both ordered the same drink", leaving it open whether it was the same instantiation of a drink, or if both drinks were instantiations of the same class.
Aug
13
answered What does “reeling” mean in “difficulties have left budgets reeling”?
Aug
13
answered Where does the term 'double-jointed' come from?
Aug
13
comment Where does the term 'double-jointed' come from?
No idea who it was, but I think it's a good comment.
Aug
13
awarded  Scholar
Aug
13
comment A word (or short phrase) for “suggesting without prejudice”
I really like yours too - if only we could accept multiple answers! Thanks for the advice!
Aug
13
accepted A word (or short phrase) for “suggesting without prejudice”