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I'm a Carnegie Mellon University Computer Science major.


Mar
21
revised “At this section…” vs. “in this section…”
edited body
Mar
21
answered “At this section…” vs. “in this section…”
Mar
21
comment “At this section…” vs. “in this section…”
Could you provide an example? The answer is contextual, so specifics would help!
Feb
11
answered What is the opposite word to “straight man” in comedy?
Feb
3
answered Reduced precision has an effect on results, but does not negate them
Jan
21
comment Is British English considered a foreign language to American English?
In that case, probably not. If you were talking about technical aspects like railroads, in which a lot of the words are different, I might note them as similar-but-distinct.
Jan
21
comment Is British English considered a foreign language to American English?
What sort of technical purposes? I imagine that there are a few in which it is, and many in which it isn't.
Jan
20
comment Addressing religious authorities
In general, personalized letters are better. Personalization includes having a specific job title. Fortunately, Wikipedia can help you in your search.
Jan
20
revised Which one is right? “Check out for… online” OR “Check out online for…”?
added 153 characters in body
Jan
20
comment Which one is right? “Check out for… online” OR “Check out online for…”?
No. You have to check something out. You could say "Check the website out" or "Check out the website", but "online" isn't specific enough a place to use as an object here. I've edited my answer to reflect that.
Jan
20
answered Which one is right? “Check out for… online” OR “Check out online for…”?
Jan
20
answered What does “white knight” mean in this context?
Jan
20
answered What is a word for a mean kind of happy?
Nov
15
comment What is the opposite of pollutant, in the sense of “victim” or “casualty”
Maybe pollutee?
Aug
3
awarded  Yearling
Jul
23
revised Do “the alpha and the omega” and “from A to Z” have the same meaning or something in common?
fixed spelling, made more coherent and concise
Jul
23
suggested suggested edit on Do “the alpha and the omega” and “from A to Z” have the same meaning or something in common?
Jul
15
comment Phrase meaning “North, but not directly North, from here”
Latitudes range from -90 to 90, but I've been led to believe that lower and higher always correspond to -infinity and +infinity, whereas smaller and larger maps to zero and one of the infinities, respectively.
Jul
15
answered Phrase meaning “North, but not directly North, from here”
Jul
2
answered Positive synonym for sacrifice