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bio website msquant.alwaysdata.net
location Århus, Denmark
age 49
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
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(Last updated 2013-04-03.)

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Jun
23
comment “anymore” vs. “any more”
But "any more" is also an adverb - en.wiktionary.org/wiki/any_more
Jun
20
comment Is it possible to regard -id as a suffix forming adjectives in Modern English?
@subic: I am sorry for the ignorance, but what is New English? Everything that is not Old English (Middle English, Early Modern English and Modern English)? Or contemporary English? From Old English: "The Old English period is followed by Middle English (12th to 15th century), Early Modern English (ca. 1480 to 1650) and finally Modern English (after 1650)."
Jun
20
comment Is it possible to regard -id as a suffix forming adjectives in Modern English?
@FumbleFingers: Wiktionary lists four, including Nebraska and northeast.
Jun
19
comment Is it possible to regard -id as a suffix forming adjectives in Modern English?
@subic: what does "NE" mean in this context?
Jun
13
comment Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon: Is there a name for this kind of punny transference?
Background: John Guare's play is from 1990. The concept is older: 1929, "Karinthy has been regarded by some as the originator of the notion of six degrees of separation." and 1961, "Michael Gurevich conducted seminal work in his empirical study of the structure of social networks"
Jun
10
comment Placing a comma after a conditional statement
"english" -> "English"
Jun
10
comment Placing a comma after a conditional statement
"wikipedia" -> "Wikipedia". Ref: <en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Wikipedia#Proper_noun>.
Jun
7
comment What causes the pronunciation “nucular”
Physicist Richard Muller addressed the pronunciation of nuclear at some length in the UC Berkeley "Physics 10" (AKA "Physics for Future Presidents") course. For one, "nucular" is how the nuclear power industry pronounces it, but I don't recall the rest. It should be possible to find the exact lecture.
May
12
comment Are uncountable nouns singular?
The first sentence is the original (from the context). The other two are my suggested sentences that might or might not be correct.
May
12
comment Rule on absence of the article “the” with plural nouns
Great example !
Apr
10
comment Who/What decides if a word is “proper” English?
Duplicate for the particular word: Is it okay to say and write “ain't” yet?
Apr
10
comment Is lolspeak bad English, or just a different English?
what is RIT? Rochester Institute of Technology?
Feb
3
comment Is the word “Americana” capitalized?
@kiamlaluno: it could be, but Americana has a distinct meaning. Americana: All things peculiar to the United States' culture and people, anything that is a symbol of American life.
Feb
2
comment Is “Law of Leaky Abstractions” a proper noun?
The quote in the question is not a title. The sentence is in the body text of the Wikipedia article: "As coined by Spolsky, the Law of Leaky Abstractions states "All non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky."". Do you mean the capitalisation from the title has leaked into the body text and statement 3 is correct?
Dec
12
comment “I'm lovin' it”
I am not qualified to answer, but this phrase was the subject of an entire episode of Grammar Girl: "According to the rule, “I’m loving it” is not grammatically correct because it uses a stative verb—in this case, one that conveys emotion, love—in a progressive tense." and "“I’m loving it” does sound slightly off, and that draws attention. Perhaps that’s why McDonald’s chose it". To native speakers that know grammar it should sound weird (?)
Nov
26
comment “Hard” vs. “hardly”
Touched upon in Do All Adverbs End in "-Ly"?, section "What Are Flat Adverbs?".
Nov
21
comment If enough people say “supposably” instead of “supposedly”
@Jon Purdy: I was thinking of two complete sentences as examples to illustrate the difference. It is a bit too abstract for me as it stands.
Nov
20
comment Is it Web site or website?
@fabrik: yes, agreed. Although in this case, today, it is 3.51 billion vs. 3.73 billion. BTW, "web site" is 0.28 billion (a factor of about 12).
Nov
20
comment Descriptivism and widespread misspelling
"Learned"/"learnt" is now a question here: english.stackexchange.com/questions/4965/…
Nov
19
comment If enough people say “supposably” instead of “supposedly”
@Jon Purdy: do you have examples to illustrate the difference?