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 Yearling
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Oct
5
revised Why do we walk on “dry land” when we should be just walking on “land”?
still unclear... sorry about change spam
Oct
5
awarded  Yearling
Oct
5
revised Why do we walk on “dry land” when we should be just walking on “land”?
changing for clarity per comments
Oct
4
revised Why do we walk on “dry land” when we should be just walking on “land”?
rewording the bit quoted from the original question for clarity
Oct
4
comment Why do we walk on “dry land” when we should be just walking on “land”?
@DavidRicherby "Or any body of water." I edited the part quoted from the question to avoid the ambiguity there.
Oct
4
answered Why do we walk on “dry land” when we should be just walking on “land”?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
10
answered What does “soft bigotry of low expectations” mean?
Feb
9
comment What does “Wonk gap” mean in brief?
I think that last comment is useful enough to make it a part of the answer.
Feb
2
awarded  Commentator
Feb
2
comment Which one is correct and why?
"If one accepts the capitalisation" - that's standard: "Eastern Shore" is a formal name for the region.
Feb
2
answered “Students avoid boring professors” is ambiguity?
Feb
2
comment The word “geriatric”
Is the Advancer Learner's Dictionary using that label for geriatric (adjective) or geriatric (noun)? (The second one is an informal usage, and usually offensive.)
Nov
22
revised Latin abbreviation to use in English to replace “as such”
Changed "et. al." to "et al." (the "et" isn't an abbreviation)
Nov
22
suggested approved edit on Latin abbreviation to use in English to replace “as such”
Aug
23
comment Is “my something of choice” the same as “something of my choice”?
@flamengo This question has been open for a while. If the answers you received have satisfied your needs, please accept one of them. ;)
Aug
23
awarded  Yearling
Aug
22
awarded  Editor
Jun
19
comment How do you capitalize a proper noun such as “iPhone”?
"You should never change a brand name" - I can see that this is standard usage, but what's the actual justification? I assume there's some published source or style guide somewhere that tries to supply some reason, however post-hoc or arbitrary it might be. (It's not like we honor some companies' desires to slap a ™ next to every single usage of their product name when we write about them in the paper.)
May
30
awarded  Citizen Patrol