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Feb
10
answered Is there a word that means “to rotate into the correct position”?
Jan
25
comment Usage of “do by”
@Jim, I think what he/she wants in the last is example is "Sir, you have done wrong by me".
Jan
25
comment What rule can I give to authors who start sentences with “-ing” words when it's inappropriate?
Your examples sound stilted and bureaucratic, but your proposed solution makes that problem even worse.
Jan
25
comment What rule can I give to authors who start sentences with “-ing” words when it's inappropriate?
So you prefer "The championation of foreign languages has disadvantaged speakers of indigenous languages"?
Jan
13
comment Is there an equivalent term to “Cold Turkey” for starting something instead of quitting something?
I think Twain was saying that he would likely have to leave on short notice without much choice in the matter...at the point of a pitchfork or under threat of lynching, perhaps.
Jan
9
comment /ə/ in a stressed syllable?
butter, putter, cutter, mutter, slummer, summer, hugger, rugger, smother, glummer, mugger, humbug, ...
Jan
5
comment “time” for instants or durations in science
@StoneyB, in technical usage, period normally refers to the duration of each repetition of a periodic (repeating) behavior. For example, "the period of a sine wave" or "the orbital period [of a planet or moon]". In fields (like physics or engineering) where this usage is common, using period to describe a non-periodic event could be confusing.
Jan
5
comment “time” for instants or durations in science
According to the International Electrotechnical Vocabulary, "In common language, the word “time” is used with several different meanings. In technical language, however, more precise terms, e.g. date, duration, time interval should be used."
Jan
5
comment Can you use indentations within paragraphs in conjunction with spaced paragraphs
Sounds to me more like the teacher wanted a hamburger essay. If your paragraphs were too long, s/he'd probably really rather you just skipped some of your arguments so s/he'd have a shorter paper to grade.
Dec
28
comment “kinda”, “sorta”, “coulda”, “shoulda”, “lotta”, “oughta”, “betcha”, “tseasy” etc. What are these?
@SlippD.Thompson, I betcha that sometimes betcha means "bet you", but you betcha it also sometimes means "bet your".
Oct
19
comment What part of speech is “down” in “Put your pencils down”?
While "put your pencils down" is something of a set phrase, do you really see down as obligatory here [assuming I understand what you mean by obligatory]? You could also say "put your pencils away", "put your pencils over there", "put your pencils back in your desks", etc.
Oct
17
comment Just Googling it
If it's written without a comma or ellipses I think I'd just about always read it as a gerund (with no pause). To express the student's version in writing, I think you need some punctuation (comma, period, ellipses) between googling and it.
Oct
17
comment Just Googling it
FYI: gerund.
Oct
17
comment Just Googling it
Consider a similar phrase: "Just asking stackexchange is bad for your brain." Is it more clear when I use a word (asking) that's not such a recent inventioin as googling?
Sep
22
comment In which etymology
In older (Victorian?) era novels it was common for the chapters instead of having titles to have a short synopsis beginning with "in which...". For example, chapter 3 might be the chapter "in which Johnny discovers his long-lost aunt". This fits your definition well, since we are describing what makes this chapter unique out of the group of all the chapters in the book. When you see this construction in contemporary writing, its usually an allusion to this old-fashioned way of introducing book chapters.
Sep
10
comment English translation for Kockásfülű Nyúl (Hungarian)
FWIW, there's a well-known English kids' book called The Velveteen Rabbit, which might give you some idea how a similar concept was treated in English.
Aug
4
comment Word for “void of people”
This only works for locations that might normally be inhabited. You wouldn't talk about an "uninhabited soccer field", for example. "Unoccupied" similarly might work in some contexts, but not necessarily all contexts.
Jan
9
comment In reference to statistics as it relates to information about research?
"Statistical practice"?
Jan
7
comment Single word for “factor or consideration that supports a specific conclusion or position”
"Argument" also works in the given example. Since the example follows up the missing word with "in favor", it's not necessary for the requested single word to also convey that the factor or consideration supports the conclusion.
Oct
13
comment Does seriously have only sarcastic connotations in this context?
Your example says something is "brave" when the writer obviously thinks it isn't. I don't see how there's any other way to read this than sarcasm.