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 Yearling
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Jul
25
awarded  Yearling
Jun
1
answered Can I say “awaken me from my naive view”?
May
6
answered What is a word in English that means “able to learn new things quickly”?
Apr
12
comment What is the best format to use when writing out dates?
I reject the assumption that more standardization amounts to improvement.
Apr
12
answered Is it “anybody have plans” or “anybody has plans”?
Apr
3
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
30
comment Do I travel “up” or “down” to London from north of the city?
“Zealous"? Really?
Mar
22
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
21
comment “Ask help/permission/forgiveness” or “Ask FOR help/permission/forgiveness”?
Our linguistic version of the Great Wall of China, and perhaps just as effective.
Mar
10
comment How to convert this sentence into passive voice?
Yes, you changed the meaning. Look closely at what you wrote. The original sentence was a statement of what was required and by whom it was required. Nothing was said about the installation actually having been accomplished. Your proposed sentence is a statement that it was accomplished and why. Also see my suggestion in the comments below. Moreover, I too am curious as to why you would want to change the original statement, unless simply as an intellectual exercise. It is certainly the simplest, the most elegant, and the clearest.
Mar
10
comment How to convert this sentence into passive voice?
The software code is required by the carrier to be installed on the iPhone by the manufacturer. I think that this changes the original sentence as little as possible while converting both the finite verb and the infinitive to the passive.
Sep
30
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
25
awarded  Yearling
Jul
25
awarded  Yearling
Apr
22
revised The right usage of the verb “elaborate”
added 7 characters in body
Apr
20
comment When I write any sentence in English every native reader can tell I am Europen, how?
@Mitch. Yes, rather sadly, British people now seem content to regard themselves quite unembarrassedly as Europeans.
Apr
20
comment I'd be honored if it was/were you
Thanks very much. That's what I wanted to verify, that a speaker of British English would understand all three to mean the same thing.
Apr
20
comment Does the word, ‘decorator’ have a special meaning other than a person who designs (or paints) the interior and exterior of houses?
I should add that those whom we call decorators in the United States now seem to regard it as infra dig to be called that. They prefer to be called interior designers.
Apr
20
comment Does the word, ‘decorator’ have a special meaning other than a person who designs (or paints) the interior and exterior of houses?
In the United States, we don't use decorator to mean the painter or the paper-hanger. Rather, decorator is always understood to be the person who does the planning and gives instructions to the painters, etc. Would decorator ever be understood in the UK in this way?