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location New York, NY
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visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen Sep 9 at 20:44

Jul
25
awarded  Yearling
Jul
25
awarded  Yearling
Apr
22
revised The right usage of the verb “elaborate”
added 7 characters in body
Apr
20
comment When I write any sentence in English every native reader can tell I am Europen, how?
@Mitch. Yes, rather sadly, British people now seem content to regard themselves quite unembarrassedly as Europeans.
Apr
20
comment I'd be honored if it was/were you
Thanks very much. That's what I wanted to verify, that a speaker of British English would understand all three to mean the same thing.
Apr
20
comment Does the word, ‘decorator’ have a special meaning other than a person who designs (or paints) the interior and exterior of houses?
I should add that those whom we call decorators in the United States now seem to regard it as infra dig to be called that. They prefer to be called interior designers.
Apr
20
comment Does the word, ‘decorator’ have a special meaning other than a person who designs (or paints) the interior and exterior of houses?
In the United States, we don't use decorator to mean the painter or the paper-hanger. Rather, decorator is always understood to be the person who does the planning and gives instructions to the painters, etc. Would decorator ever be understood in the UK in this way?
Apr
20
comment What does “unit” mean in “storage unit”?
I think you have pretty well figured it out by extrapolating from the OALD definitions.
Apr
20
comment What does “unit” mean in “storage unit”?
By the way, in English we consider furniture to be a non-count noun, so instead of furnitures, furniture would be better.
Apr
20
comment What does “unit” mean in “storage unit”?
Is it possible for us to see the context in which you encountered this term unit of storage.
Apr
20
comment What is the difference between “anticipate” and “expect”?
At least in the United States, expect can have a somewhat imperative or peremptory quality, e.g., a mother to her children: I expect that you will behave yourselves. Fleshing this out, one gets: You know that I want you to behave and, since you fear disappointing me, I regard it as likely that you will behave.
Apr
20
comment I'd be honored if it was/were you
Don't speakers of British English say things such as I insist that she comes meaning the same thing as I insist that she should come? This is what I remember hearing and reading. While the second example would be understood by Americans as equivalent to I insist that she come, the first would not.
Apr
20
awarded  Enthusiast
Apr
19
revised What is the clearest way to describe two “kitty-corner” buildings?
improved diction
Apr
19
comment A better, more academic way of saying 'whether or not'
Yeah, I routinely have to prune stuff. Things like in my opinion, x seems to be y would usually be much better if one lopped off expressions such as in my opinion and said instead x seems to be y. Just for funsies, would maybe more simple and clearer be better as simpler and clearer?
Apr
19
comment I'd be honored if it was/were you
Very true. The use of the indicative in British English where we Americans would use the subjunctive can sound quite odd to our ears and can even lead to misunderstanding. For example, She insists that he is present means to us something quite different than She insists that he be present. Even when there is not a risk of confusion, it still sounds "off" to us.
Apr
19
comment A better, more academic way of saying 'whether or not'
I hope, Timer, that I don't get you into trouble! It's always possible that your tutors and professors really like language that I should consider pompous, artificial, verbose and unnecessarily abstruse or even obscurantist.
Apr
19
comment Does the word, ‘decorator’ have a special meaning other than a person who designs (or paints) the interior and exterior of houses?
My experience of British English seems to show that decorator in the British Isles can often refer to someone whom we'd call in the United States simply a painter or an interior painter. In the United States decorator is usually understood to refer to an interior decorator or an interior designer. I'm curious to know if decorator has that meaning in British English as well.
Apr
19
comment I'd be honored if it was/were you
Well, "taking your place" may not be improbable, but it certainly is, at least at the moment of speaking, a "hypothesized state of unreality" since it hasn't happened yet, so by your own criteria, Dmitry, the subjunctive ought to be used here. It's really a simple contrary-to-fact condition: If it were you who took my place (but you haven't done so—yet), then I would be honored.
Apr
19
answered A better, more academic way of saying 'whether or not'