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seen Oct 26 at 0:27

Jul
25
comment Is there a verb meaning “to make similar”?
aligns or calibrates?
Aug
9
comment Is it redundant to append “bye” to “speak to you later”?
@CJM I'm with you!
Aug
12
comment Using “non-” to prefix a two-word phrase
The solution you used in publication is definitely more intuitive to a reader unfamiliar with dash hierarchy, but I am reassured by both methods.
Aug
12
comment Using “non-” to prefix a two-word phrase
Thanks for explaining part of it!
Jul
11
comment Failed Experiment?
The question was also partly motivated by seeing the phrase in scientific contexts, which is exactly what made me wonder.
Jul
11
comment Are there any words in English that have a plural with a separate derivation?
Those appear to have the same derivation.
Jul
11
comment Failed Experiment?
@FumbleFingers Until your link I had never heard of either of those formulations, and I genuinely thank you for the interesting quotation. It is notoriously difficult to gather information on usage by googling e.g., which is one of the great things about a site like this. Whether the conventional interpretation of a potentially misinterpreted phrase is definitionally strict or not is exactly what I sought to learn by asking this question, although I see that it could appear otherwise when one is already familiar with the conventions.
Jul
11
comment Failed Experiment?
@FumbleFingers Because failure is obviously objective, because failure is obviously subjective, or because there is obviously irreconcilable ambiguity? And thanks for the quote! I've never heard that before.
Jul
11
comment Failed Experiment?
@Mitch Interesting. I guess the things that would make it English-specific would be the idiomatic ambiguity of the word "experiment", as well as the usage of the word "failure" as a subjective or objective descriptor.
Jul
9
comment Commas around “and”
It looks to me like no comma is necessary. Why not "We have the option to provide notifications via telephone and possibly via email."?
Oct
9
comment What are some products that are now words?
@JohnC I have heard it used to refer to any small grill.
Jul
12
comment What is the agent of a trial called?
@msh210 Good point. Specified the question. To wit, as in Abraham at the Binding of Isaac.
Jul
12
comment Recur vs. Reoccur
Very interesting.
Jul
12
comment Recur vs. Reoccur
@Rhodri let us continue this discussion in chat
Jul
12
comment Recur vs. Reoccur
"Something that reoccurs happens again, but not necessarily repeatedly..." In this case, either the event of happening is repeated, in which case it must occur three times to be consistent with the definition, or the event of reoccurring is repeated, in which case this is either a truism, or a recursive definition.
Jul
12
comment Recur vs. Reoccur
The qualifiers on the event's happening at regular intervals are "perhaps" (for recur) and "not necessarily" (for reoccur). These terms are equivalent unless they express degrees of likelihood. Also "repeatedly" in that formulation must mean "at least three times", which is strange.
Jul
12
comment Recur vs. Reoccur
Your explanation makes sense, and according to it the description of the distinction that I quoted is at best poorly worded and at worst misleading.
Jul
12
comment Recur vs. Reoccur
If you expected it to happen exactly once more in the future, which would you use? For argument's sake, let's say you expected it to happen at a regular interval exactly once.
Jun
21
comment Is there a schwa in the middle of Coleridge?
@Cerberus Thanks for unAmericanizing my IPA.
Jun
7
comment “Thank both of you”
So my first example ("thank both of you...") would be acceptable, despite its sounding very wrong to my ear?