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location United States
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Aug 28 at 4:18
Long-time Informix user and developer, experienced in C and Unix (many variants). Email: jonathan.leffler@gmail.com

Jun
3
comment Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
@SteveJessop: the question title always had "and malted barley" at the end. When the title was first copied into the question body, the all-important "and malted barley" was replaced by an ellipsis. I've copied the three words in place of the three dots.
May
26
comment What word or phrase means “a loss of what was on your mind”?
I'm not convinced aporia is correct in context. Aposiopesis is more nearly on target, but still has connotations of voluntary discontinuity of expression whereas the question is more about involuntary behaviour. I'd agree with drawing a blank or brain fart.
Feb
23
comment “Forgot” vs “Forget”
@BenCrowell: obviously, I disagree with you, but each to their own dialect of English.
Jun
13
comment Differentiate between past and present just by pronunciation when word is followed by d- or similiar sound
I'm pretty much in agreement with superdemongob. In the 'killed the' version, if the 'd' followed by 'the' is not fully separated, then the 'd' gets sounded and the 'th' gets mangled/dropped (almost like 'killed uh').
Sep
25
comment How long does it take to mull something over?
'Fortnight' is a contraction of 'fourteen nights'; in Jane Austen (Pride & Prejudice, Chapter 13, Mr Collins letter), you come across "se'ennight" for 'seven nights' or 'week'. 'Fortnight' is not only Old English; it is still used frequently in England (but "se'ennight" is obsolete). I've never heard of "Mull" in the context of 'fortnight', but that may be just not having listened to the right information.
Mar
1
comment “We've got you covered” on an umbrella
I think all puns are plays on words, but there are plays on words which are not puns.
Jan
26
comment Is there a prefix that indicates that an event recurs four times a year?
Biweekly for every two weeks (or fortnightly if you aren't in the USA). Bimonthly for every two months. Trimonthly would be a possibility, but 'quarterly' is a better choice.
Jan
13
comment How does one deal with one word in parenthesis at the start of a sentence?
I think the circumstances of this question are slightly different from the other, so they are not exact duplicates.
Jan
5
comment How does one deal with one word in parenthesis at the start of a sentence?
I think your new example should probably treat the (Maybe) as a single word sentence (interjection), and punctuate accordingly (Maybe.) or (Maybe!) or (Maybe...). Or treat it as a parenthetical adverbial at the end of the first sentence: ... I'm never baking again (maybe!). The whole kitchen ....
Sep
20
comment How to write “calf's liver” on menu
I'm not convinced 'we all agree' is correct; I don't, for one. I think calves' liver is likely to be correct quite often.
Sep
5
comment There is/are one or several apple/~s?
+1 for the 'There is at least one apple' alternative.
Sep
4
comment What do you call someone who chooses to stay single for life?
Is 'sensible' allowed?
Sep
3
comment Meaning of “a wisp in the ether”?
If 'shadow' translates and the alternatives don't, you're probably close enough not to matter. 'Disembodied shadow'? Accurate but ugly; the original has a poetic cast to it, and 'disembodied' does not. Good luck; choice of words is hard enough in English without struggling to get it into another language too.
Sep
3
comment Meaning of “a wisp in the ether”?
Close, but a shadow can imply a solid body (and a light source) casting it, whereas a wisp denies solidity. 'Gossamer' has some of the right connotations; 'ghost' or 'spirit' or 'phantom' have some of the right connotations. Maybe 'like a phantom in the æther' might work, if you can translate 'phantom' well.
Sep
3
comment Meaning of “a wisp in the ether”?
I can't think how you would derive 'stack' from 'wisp'; it seems a very odd translation, and would indeed be confusing.
Aug
27
comment Origin and meaning of “You catch more flies with honey than you do with vinegar”
You don't catch flies in order to be nice to them; you catch flies by being nice to them. Flies are not attracted by vinegar; flies might well be attracted by honey.
Aug
24
comment Is there a word for the act of dimming an oil lamp?
Two wholly separate meanings of trim.
Aug
24
comment Is there a word for the act of dimming an oil lamp?
To trim an oil lamp is to cut the wick so that the flame is more moderate (so it does dim it), but I believe you could turn down the wick on an oil lamp to reduce the light without trimming the wick.
Aug
23
comment “Just deserts” or “just desserts”
It seems to me that 'just desserts' is what kids would like for every meal; skip the main course, and have just desserts.
Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
I'm puzzled about the contrasting ranges being 'lower' and 'larger'. A 'low range' might be appropriate for music or gears, and the opposite would be a 'high range'. A 'large range' might be appropriate for where a species is found in the wild or the difference between the smallest and largest values in a matrix, and the opposite would be a 'small range'.