5,270 reputation
1229
bio website None
location United States
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Apr 10 at 23:04
Long-time Informix user and developer, experienced in C and Unix (many variants). Email: jonathan.leffler@gmail.com

Aug
13
comment Appropriate use of the term “transversely”
I'm puzzled about the contrasting ranges being 'lower' and 'larger'. A 'low range' might be appropriate for music or gears, and the opposite would be a 'high range'. A 'large range' might be appropriate for where a species is found in the wild or the difference between the smallest and largest values in a matrix, and the opposite would be a 'small range'.
Aug
13
answered Is “of course” just a warning that something is NOT obvious?
Jul
27
answered “A guy whose job is to” vs “a guy whose job it is to”?
Jul
27
answered “Undertake” and “overtake”
Jul
8
comment News - Singular or Plural
@MT_Head: I only noticed the x-ref in the 'related' list after writing my answer, too..
Jul
8
comment Does the end of this sentence convey what I want it to mean?
From the given context, it is not clear to me whether the remarkable prose is written using difficult mathematical ideas to explain humanities-related metaphors, or the other way around. However, the larger context would presumably make that clear. If it is to be taken in isolation, I would remove the ambiguity: "It is quite a remarkable piece of prose because it uses intuitive, humanities-related metaphors to explain difficult mathematical ideas rather than, as so often, the other way round.", or the converse organization.
Jul
8
answered News - Singular or Plural
Jul
8
revised Is the expression, “As Casey faced her the jury, America was able to sound off in tweets, texts, Facebook postings” right?
Fix trivial typo in title
Jul
4
comment How can I differentiate between the pronunciation of “w” and “v”?
Note that words from other languages may have different rules for the pronunciations (especially of W). For example, 'cwm' in Welsh, or Weimar or Wolfgang in German.
Jul
4
revised How can I differentiate between the pronunciation of “w” and “v”?
Fix trivial typos
Jul
2
answered Meaning of “build-up”
Jun
27
comment What does “uncancellable” mean? / What is a word for “not able to be uncancelled”?
@Josh: using more than one word: "[If no-one else has taken your space] you can reinstate your cancelled appointment", or "You can rejoin the club after cancelling your subscription".
Jun
27
comment When do nouns convert between mass and count?
What is 'M&S'? Modelling and Simulation? Marks and Spencer?
Jun
27
comment When do nouns convert between mass and count?
The first two are perfectly reasonable uses of the codes, and an example citing 'codes and ciphers' would be fine too. Using 'codes' to refer to programs is a ghastly neologism (it seems to have become prevalent in the last couple of years - but that probably means I wasn't paying attention to the right (wrong?) places previously. I would serious object to the last paragraph as 'good English' for the misuse of 'codes'.
Jun
27
comment Are emails, videos, and audios, etc, considered telegrams?
Telegrams were sent over telegraph wires from one office to another, and then delivered to the intended recipient. They were paid for by the letter or word, and led to 'telegraphic English' (contractions, omitted words, etc). See Wikipedia on Telegram. (So no, your examples are not telegrams!)
Jun
24
comment 'where they would all' vs 'where they all would'?
@Robert: It would depend on what the omitted part of the sentence contained, but unless it was a question, you would be correct. If the missing part was "Are you trying to predict where would they all end up?", then you might be able to use that, though it feels a bit clumsy (incorrect) compared with "Are you trying to predict where they would all end up?"
Jun
24
revised 'where they would all' vs 'where they all would'?
Fix trivial typos
Jun
24
answered 'where they would all' vs 'where they all would'?
Jun
22
comment Is this sentence structure correct?
A' | B' | C' yields true if all of A', B' and C' are true. A' & B' & C' also yields true if all of A', B' and C' are true. The 'no' in the first alternative is understood (by me, at any rate) to apply to each of the terms A, B and C, producing A' or B' or C'.
Jun
22
answered Is this sentence structure correct?