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 Yearling
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Jan
5
answered How does one deal with one word in parenthesis at the start of a sentence?
Dec
4
answered When can a comma be used before the word 'and'?
Nov
26
awarded  Yearling
Oct
12
answered “Awfully” or “awful”?
Sep
25
answered Use of “of course” in technical writing
Sep
25
awarded  Organizer
Sep
25
revised “X has/have joined”
edited tags
Sep
23
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
20
comment How to write “calf's liver” on menu
I'm not convinced 'we all agree' is correct; I don't, for one. I think calves' liver is likely to be correct quite often.
Sep
20
answered “Referer” or “referrer”
Sep
17
answered Difference between “instantly” and “instantaneously”
Sep
10
answered Starting a sentence with “In Winter 2010,”
Sep
10
revised Starting a sentence with “In Winter 2010,”
medel --> medal
Sep
6
answered Is the apostrophe (') supposed to be omitted in names like 'King's Cross', 'King's Singers'?
Sep
5
comment There is/are one or several apple/~s?
+1 for the 'There is at least one apple' alternative.
Sep
4
comment What do you call someone who chooses to stay single for life?
Is 'sensible' allowed?
Sep
3
comment Meaning of “a wisp in the ether”?
If 'shadow' translates and the alternatives don't, you're probably close enough not to matter. 'Disembodied shadow'? Accurate but ugly; the original has a poetic cast to it, and 'disembodied' does not. Good luck; choice of words is hard enough in English without struggling to get it into another language too.
Sep
3
comment Meaning of “a wisp in the ether”?
Close, but a shadow can imply a solid body (and a light source) casting it, whereas a wisp denies solidity. 'Gossamer' has some of the right connotations; 'ghost' or 'spirit' or 'phantom' have some of the right connotations. Maybe 'like a phantom in the æther' might work, if you can translate 'phantom' well.
Sep
3
comment Meaning of “a wisp in the ether”?
I can't think how you would derive 'stack' from 'wisp'; it seems a very odd translation, and would indeed be confusing.