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awarded  Enlightened
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Sep
25
comment How long does it take to mull something over?
'Fortnight' is a contraction of 'fourteen nights'; in Jane Austen (Pride & Prejudice, Chapter 13, Mr Collins letter), you come across "se'ennight" for 'seven nights' or 'week'. 'Fortnight' is not only Old English; it is still used frequently in England (but "se'ennight" is obsolete). I've never heard of "Mull" in the context of 'fortnight', but that may be just not having listened to the right information.
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25
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Aug
7
answered using phrase “weekend of”
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Mar
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comment “We've got you covered” on an umbrella
I think all puns are plays on words, but there are plays on words which are not puns.
Mar
1
answered “We've got you covered” on an umbrella
Jan
26
comment Is there a prefix that indicates that an event recurs four times a year?
Biweekly for every two weeks (or fortnightly if you aren't in the USA). Bimonthly for every two months. Trimonthly would be a possibility, but 'quarterly' is a better choice.
Jan
13
comment How does one deal with one word in parenthesis at the start of a sentence?
I think the circumstances of this question are slightly different from the other, so they are not exact duplicates.
Jan
5
revised How does one deal with one word in parenthesis at the start of a sentence?
Add 'updated question' section
Jan
5
comment How does one deal with one word in parenthesis at the start of a sentence?
I think your new example should probably treat the (Maybe) as a single word sentence (interjection), and punctuate accordingly (Maybe.) or (Maybe!) or (Maybe...). Or treat it as a parenthetical adverbial at the end of the first sentence: ... I'm never baking again (maybe!). The whole kitchen ....