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11330
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location United States
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 10 hours ago
Long-time Informix user and developer, experienced in C and Unix (many variants). Email: jonathan.leffler@gmail.com

Aug
13
revised Is it incorrect to say “If you could”?
Spelling of "het" to "net"
Aug
13
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?
Aug
11
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?
Aug
8
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?
Jul
23
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?
Jul
23
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?
Jul
23
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?
Jul
23
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?
Jul
18
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
18
awarded  Custodian
Jul
18
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?
Jun
13
comment Differentiate between past and present just by pronunciation when word is followed by d- or similiar sound
I'm pretty much in agreement with superdemongob. In the 'killed the' version, if the 'd' followed by 'the' is not fully separated, then the 'd' gets sounded and the 'th' gets mangled/dropped (almost like 'killed uh').
Jun
13
revised Differentiate between past and present just by pronunciation when word is followed by d- or similiar sound
differ -> differentiate
Jan
20
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
12
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
26
awarded  Yearling
Oct
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
25
comment How long does it take to mull something over?
'Fortnight' is a contraction of 'fourteen nights'; in Jane Austen (Pride & Prejudice, Chapter 13, Mr Collins letter), you come across "se'ennight" for 'seven nights' or 'week'. 'Fortnight' is not only Old English; it is still used frequently in England (but "se'ennight" is obsolete). I've never heard of "Mull" in the context of 'fortnight', but that may be just not having listened to the right information.
Sep
25
awarded  Nice Answer