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11330
bio website None
location United States
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Sep 14 at 18:22
Long-time Informix user and developer, experienced in C and Unix (many variants). Email: jonathan.leffler@gmail.com

Dec
20
comment Comma and “too”
Or the 'too' could be 'as well as me'...
Dec
20
comment Comma and “too”
There should be commas either side of a name interpolated into a sentence - even in modern writing.
Dec
20
answered Punctuating and constructing a confusing list
Dec
20
answered What does it mean to be “hard done by” - a phrase I heard from a Canadian friend
Dec
13
answered Any term pertaining to geography, but not to toponymy?
Dec
13
comment “Hear hear” or “here here”
+1 for introducing me to the word 'eggcorn'.
Dec
12
answered Other meanings for “punctual” besides “on time”
Dec
10
comment What are the important differences between Canadian and American (USA) English?
@Jaime: See the answer from @brilliant.
Dec
10
comment “human brain capacity” or “human brain's capacity”
'To do' is the infinitive of the verb 'do'. There is no finite verb in the clauses, though.
Dec
9
answered What are the important differences between Canadian and American (USA) English?
Dec
8
comment Why is 'an' used with 'an honour'?
I can't help it if they weren't brought up to speak proper, can I? :D
Dec
8
awarded  Commentator
Dec
8
comment Why is 'an' used with 'an honour'?
But that's because it is pronounced "an 'istoric occasion at an 'otel", but "the historic hotel" has fully aspirated h's; English is weird! You also, of course, get "an umbrella" but "a ukelele".
Dec
7
answered Have grammar rules changed through the history of the English language?
Dec
6
comment The place where the railroad crosses the road
It would be worth noting that a level crossing is where the RAILWAY crosses the road - there are no railroads at all in England.
Dec
6
revised Proper punctuation for “and what's more”?
Slightly improve the use of English
Dec
6
answered Cultural connotation of American English — some examples?
Dec
6
answered Is “litter” correct on waste bins?
Dec
6
revised Children were sitting on their parents' lap or laps?
Remove superfluous parentheses
Dec
5
answered An adjective to describe a substance consisting of smaller-size grains