5,288 reputation
11331
bio website None
location United States
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Sep 25 at 20:44
Long-time Informix user and developer, experienced in C and Unix (many variants). Email: jonathan.leffler@gmail.com

Jan
25
comment How come 'ou' was reduced to 'o' in the US?
They're lazy - they also drop the doubled-consonant in words like 'travelling'. Or, maybe, they were ecologically sound before everyone else and tried to save paper and ink? No, maybe not...
Jan
23
comment Is there a reason behind the ordering of letters in the English alphabet?
It's funny - there are at least two 'English' alphabets; the UK English one (the definitive English English alphabet?) that has zed as its twenty-sixth letter, and the US English (American alphabet?) that has zee as its twenty-sixth letter.
Jan
21
comment “Oyster perpetual”
+1: I think part of the significance of 'Oyster' is that its casing is sealed as tight as an oyster - water does not get in.
Jan
20
comment Issues with articles
@Anderson: If you say "On Wall Street", you are using a proper name, and I wouldn't use any article, any more than I'd say "If I address a comment to an [or 'the'] Anderson Silva, he will respond" - because there is only one Anderson in this context. I could use "I wonder which of the 20 people named Anderson Silva living in [some country] will respond; it would be fun to have an Anderson Silva talk to me". Then the article 'an' is appropriate.
Jan
20
revised Issues with articles
Ouch - missing 'eed' at word 3! (Cries with shame - the ignominy of it!)
Jan
19
answered When does a mistake become standard usage?
Jan
19
answered Issues with articles
Jan
19
comment “Cancelled” or “Canceled”?
Funny that it isn't 'speled' like that!
Jan
18
answered Should there be a comma before “though” when it occurs at the end of a sentence?
Jan
18
awarded  Critic
Jan
17
answered “Worse comes to worst” or “worst comes to worst”
Jan
17
comment Use like something in a sentence
@Borror0: if I had edit privileges, perhaps. I don't have them (yet). I suspect that the OP is speaking English as a second language; I hope that my explanations will help him or her improve their 'Use of English' - as well as provide an answer to the direct or main question.
Jan
17
comment Use like something in a sentence
Because I'm an old fuddy-duddy? Probably. The slash is meant to mean 'or', and the word looks better. The English style books that I learned from discouraged the slash - so I'm reiterating what I learned a long time ago. In engineering circles, 'week/day' would be 'weeks per day', and the answer had better be 1/7 (unless you're working in business weeks, in which case, I suppose it is 1/5).
Jan
17
answered Use like something in a sentence
Jan
16
answered Why is it “on *the* one hand”?
Jan
16
answered Were contractions less common in olden days?
Jan
16
answered What does “the D word” mean in the context of discussing the pros and cons of marriage over co-habitation?
Jan
15
revised “Forgot” vs “Forget”
Fix I/you confusion
Jan
15
answered “Forgot” vs “Forget”
Jan
14
revised What's the difference between “yet another” and “another”?
Add to info