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11331
bio website None
location United States
age 53
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 22 hours ago
Long-time Informix user and developer, experienced in C and Unix (many variants). Email: jonathan.leffler@gmail.com

Feb
15
comment “What can I be of help”
I would diagnose 'typo' of 'what' where 'that' was intended. It is not correct, but in a forum, you cannot expect every message to be perfectly grammatically correct, and should allow for lax usage. (This forum is something of an exception; the people here are concerned about correct usage, so most content can be scrutinized for accuracy.)
Feb
11
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
10
awarded  Enthusiast
Feb
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
9
answered How long does it take to mull something over?
Feb
7
comment “Will have” vs. “Would have”
@Aviral: it is correct if you intended the meaning outlined; if you intended the second meaning, the first is incorrect.
Feb
4
revised “Ice possible” or “Possible ice”?
Expand and clarify
Feb
4
answered “Ice possible” or “Possible ice”?
Feb
2
answered Do Brits understand rhyming slang or are they sometimes puzzled by it too?
Feb
1
comment When traveling abroad, are you “oversea” or “overseas”?
@afriza: from the UK, we tend to regard anything in England, Scotland or Wales as 'not overseas' and anything else as 'overseas'. One of the merits of being a (smallish) island is that you do go 'overseas' to most other countries.
Feb
1
comment When traveling abroad, are you “oversea” or “overseas”?
Does M-W list when 'oversea' was last used in Britain? I don't recall ever seeing it, and would have regarded it as erroneous if I had, regardless of what M-W said about its historical usage.
Feb
1
comment When traveling abroad, are you “oversea” or “overseas”?
I have never heard the singular 'oversea' used in Britain, and I lived there a long time before migrating. You can use 'oversee' in appropriate contexts, but that is a wholly different word.
Jan
31
comment How do I know when a word with “ch” is pronounced hard or softly?
There are regional differences in the pronunciation of 'schedule' (like 'school' or like 'sheep').
Jan
31
comment How do I know when a word with “ch” is pronounced hard or softly?
Also 'loch' and other words from Gaelic use a 'k'-like sound - a guttural 'kh'.
Jan
31
comment Why is “ass” considered obscene?
Donkeys are not obscene.
Jan
29
comment Do these river names mean anything?
@PLL: I hadn't heard that one - but your URL led me to Wikipedia's List of tautological place names which does include 'Pendle Hill' amongst its celebrities - though I knew of that independently of Wikipedia.
Jan
28
comment Do these river names mean anything?
For the specifics, Ward gave an excellent answer. There are other similar anomalies in place names in the British Isles. One of my favourites is Pendle Hill. The word 'pen' means hill. Later, the next incomers changed the hill's name to 'Pendle', meaning 'hill hill'. And then the next incomers, not knowing the etymology (and sadly lacking an internet) called it Pendle Hill or 'hill hill hill', so Pendle Hill really, really, really is a hill, because anything said three times is the truth.
Jan
25
comment “Give me one half of that” Vs. “give me half of that”
@Roberto: comment converted to an answer...and removed as a comment. I thought Shaun's answer was pretty reasonable; my comment (now answer) wasn't all that different.
Jan
25
answered “Give me one half of that” Vs. “give me half of that”