Reputation
5,619
Top tag
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
1 14 31
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~879k people reached

Apr
2
revised Meaning of “it was gone 2pm”?
added 292 characters in body
Apr
2
answered Meaning of “it was gone 2pm”?
Mar
31
comment Words whose pronunciation remains the same with the last four letters removed
The words are mostly in the 'ugh' group - borough in particular (as PLL pointed out in his answer); 'thru' sorta, but the number is quite small (a single digit, I suspect). @Martha: yes, I know I'm cheating - that's why it was a comment and not an answer! (But "thoro'" with the apostrophe to indicate stuff missing might be semi-kosher.)
Mar
31
comment Words whose pronunciation remains the same with the last four letters removed
There a number words where you can remove the last three letters and and up with almost the same word: thorough etc.
Mar
26
comment What's the meaning of “as it did” in this sentence?
What you said, with the added connotation that things may not be the same now as they were at the time under discussion.
Mar
25
answered What does the phrase “I’m down with” mean?
Mar
23
comment Is there any suffix expressing “demand a lot”?
@trVoldemort: I know - and I said I do not think there is a single suffix that fits the bill, though I'll concede that 'intensive' is likely as good as it gets.
Mar
23
answered Is there any suffix expressing “demand a lot”?
Mar
20
revised How does one write the name of a married female and spouse in a list of classmates?
Out on a limb; added 2 characters in body
Mar
20
revised How does one write the name of a married female and spouse in a list of classmates?
Add URL; added 67 characters in body
Mar
20
answered How does one write the name of a married female and spouse in a list of classmates?
Mar
16
revised Difference between 'obliterate' and 'eliminate'
Add Sherlock Holmes quote
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
15
answered Difference between 'obliterate' and 'eliminate'
Mar
8
answered “I have never said” versus “I never said”
Mar
8
comment Using the definite article before a country/state name
Also, I 100% agree that most countries do not get a definite article in front of them, but I didn't say that they do. Spain, France, Portugal, ... in fact, just about any European country except the ones I mentioned will not take a definite article. The Principality of Monaco would; the Vatican would; they aren't quite countries, though. You'd not say 'the North Carolina', but you might say the Carolinas (or the Dakotas), referring to both the North and South states. It tends to be 'the XXXX' when XXXX implies a number of parts. The United Arab Emirates, but Saudi Arabia or Kuwait.
Mar
8
comment Using the definite article before a country/state name
I would not have said 'The British Honduras'; it would be just 'British Honduras is now known as Belize'.
Mar
8
answered Using the definite article before a country/state name
Mar
8
revised Using the definite article before a country/state name
Fix grammar (form grammer) and the grammar
Mar
7
answered “Well-being” versus “happiness”