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Apr
26
revised Why is the verb used without ā€œ-sā€ in this sentence?
insert missing 'is' in title and other tweaks
Feb
12
comment “A cup of hot coffee” or “A hot cup of coffee”
A cup of iced coffee is probably more attractive than an iced cup of coffee. But I mostly agree with what you're saying.
Feb
8
comment Opposite of “mutually exclusive”
Is 'corequisite' a word that's already known? It would have the right meaning, I believe. 'Mutually exclusive' means 'cannot be used together'; I believe 'corequisite' would mean 'both must be used together'. A Google search on 'define:corequisite' says it exists and seems to refer to 'Corequisites are courses that must be taken at the same time.' So, maybe it isn't usually used as an antonym of mutually exclusive, but it is not a wholly unreasonable term to use.
Jan
9
revised “It worked for me in high school and it's been a reflex ever since”?
highs --> high to match fixed question
Jan
9
revised “It worked for me in high school and it's been a reflex ever since”?
Fix trivial typos
Jan
3
revised Lack of commas or just misunderstanding
Fix trivial typos
Dec
24
revised What do you call someone who obsessively thinks they are sick?
grammar in title
Nov
26
awarded  Yearling
Nov
21
comment In what order should you say people's names?
If "we lost the match" isn't suitable, then "you, he and I lost the match" is normal. In other words, I don't think the positive/negative distinction is valid in English. At least, not in English English as I was taught it half a century ago.
Nov
21
comment In what order should you say people's names?
I don't think the advice about "I first when negative" is valid. The second example sentence is simply not idiomatic English.
Nov
21
comment What does 'TL;DR' mean and how is it used?
In my work environment, it is normally considered polite to put the TL;DR comment at the top of the email, leaving the details below for those who need to read it all.
Nov
20
comment “…and all would have to be accounted for.” Improper sentence ending at 'for'. Please suggest alternative
It is fine as it stands, but if you must change it, then "and we would have to account for all of them", where the agent ("we") could be changed to suit the circumstances.
Nov
14
answered What is the opposite of an exhaustive list?
Oct
7
answered Word or phrase for a woman who shows up at events in gaudy outfits, garish make-up, and excessive jewelry?
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Jul
2
awarded  Famous Question
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
Jun
3
comment Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
@SteveJessop: the question title always had "and malted barley" at the end. When the title was first copied into the question body, the all-important "and malted barley" was replaced by an ellipsis. I've copied the three words in place of the three dots.
Jun
3
revised Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley
Copy the last three words from the title into the question - making some of the comments obsolete