469 reputation
37
bio website radicalbender.com
location Sachse, TX
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Sep 23 at 18:07

Christian, Husband, Father, Web Developer
Fan of Texas Rangers (baseball), NASCAR, science fiction, Apple, the Oxford comma, and all manner of esoterica and ephemera.

That may be the only sentence on the internet with "NASCAR" and "Oxford" in it.

Well…two sentences, rather.


Jul
19
awarded  Yearling
Jul
19
awarded  Yearling
Jul
30
comment If someone talks too low, or mumbles, do you call that 'inaudible' or 'unintelligible'?
It's also worth noting that closed captioning on television (at least in the U.S.) also does the same thing, usually using [inaudible] when it can't be heard or [no dialogue] if someone appears to be speaking but is intentionally not meant to be heard.
Jul
27
comment Apostrophe after Proper Noun ending with s
Perhaps not elegant, but as a Texan, I assure you it is correct. :)
Jul
27
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
27
comment Usage of A/An dependent on preferential pronunciation?
This has been asked before: english.stackexchange.com/questions/7231/how-is-sql-pronounced
Jul
27
answered Is the phrase “consistently inconsistent” redundant and does it have a single word?
Jul
26
answered “Communicate over” vs. “communicate through”
Jul
26
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
25
comment Words that define a type of word and also obey that definition
Also adjectival…
Jul
25
comment Differences in use of “mandate” and “remit”
For what it's worth, I've never heard remit used this way in American English, so if you were writing this for a U.S. audience, I would imagine that "mandate" would probably be more widely understood (such as the "individual mandate" in the health care bill).
Jul
25
comment What do you call a USB flash disk?
Yeah, Memory Stick would probably work for most people, but would cause confusion with anyone who was familiar with Sony products because it is a brand name for them. You'll notice even on the Wikipedia article, they have a disambiguation notice at the top directing people looking for USB flash drives.
Jul
24
comment “put X down to” vs. “put down X to”: subjects of verbs with two particles
The sentence doesn't read well either way. The author could've used the verb "apply" (i.e., "to apply many coats") which would've been less ambiguous and more precise. ("To apply" is a more frequently-used term for home improvement concepts like painting, staining and polishing.)
Jul
24
awarded  Caucus
Jul
24
answered Does the abbreviation for Saint in a church name require a period?
Jul
23
answered “Any requirement” or “any requirements”
Jul
20
answered difference between “increase of ” and “increase by”
Jul
20
answered Capitalisation of titles
Jul
20
awarded  Supporter