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Apr
7
comment something catch my strong interest
If you already have the interest in sth., it already caught your interest. 'catch' is only for when you don't have the interest yet: "I haven't really tried it before, but once I do, I think it will really catch my interest." Also, you wouldn't use "strong interest" to signify the intensity, rather you would emphasize how much your interest is caught, eg. "It really caught my interest"
Mar
28
comment Idiom Question: “And no money is spent by the dead.”
@ab2 Thank you. Yes, I am a native English speaker, although I grew up in a multilingual home. That said, the expression was not particularly native to our household. It is commonly heard around town (as common as pointless hassles that no one cares to bother with are, anyhow).
Mar
28
comment Idiom Question: “And no money is spent by the dead.”
Oh my, @ab2, caught in a blunder. Indeed you are right. My sincere apologies. I should have mentioned the place, instead of detailing that it was where I live. I have ruined it now :( Telling you now, would be telling you where I live, and I don't divulge such personal information on the public internet. I realise this makes my answer default to the much weaker statement "it is common somewhere, here are some common uses used in that place". I shall not make this mistake again. Also, if anyone else supplies an answer with common uses, I shall remove my post.
Mar
28
answered Idiom Question: “And no money is spent by the dead.”
Mar
28
comment I realized I was or I am
use was, because clearly you're not God any more... if you were, you would know the answer to this, or if indeed it were yet undecided which was correct, you would simply pick one and thereby make that the truth.
Mar
23
comment Overly concerned with unimportant details
or anal-retentive, more commonly referred to simply as anal
Mar
23
reviewed Reviewed Overly concerned with unimportant details
Mar
23
comment Overly concerned with unimportant details
Perhaps you have a context you might like to share?
Mar
23
comment “I want this so bad I'll do anything for it!”
Who are you to make that call? Maybe the person is indeed willing to do anything.. Next time someone approaches you with that question, ask them for a kidney, or to jump-skip every step at work for a week, or sow wings onto their pyjamas and send you a picture... people might just surprise you, and even if most people say no, it'll be worth it for the couple that say yes :D
Mar
23
comment Origin of “moke,” used in the mildly derogatory term “you lil' moke”
slang for hot chocolate that tastes like coffee, ydr! aka. mocha?
Mar
17
comment An idiomatic alternative to “familiar with the matter”
An agreement will soon be reached by the two big companies according to people, who were in on the murder.
Mar
17
comment Meaning of “stub your toe” (apply too much cologne to oneself)?
@Lawrence I believe ah yah means oh, yeah, I get it
Mar
17
comment Is apostrophe-s ('s) only for “is” and “has”?
'Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house, not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse
Mar
17
comment Cables vs. Cabling
basically cabling is installed in the wall, whereas cables could be installed, on the floor, or still out in the van for that matter.
Mar
15
comment Using a slash (/) between multi-word phrases
I feel like you are mixing 2 questions. 1) The placement of spaces around slash when listing multi-word options. 2) Multi-word adjectives should always have a hyphen, when together with a noun so as to distinguish the sentences "in progress-issues" from "in-progress issues". Thus, the multi-word rule you wish to learn, does not apply to any of your examples, the first two being simply wrong./ The true answer to the first question, I am interested in myself. Personally, I use a space before and after the hyphen when dealing with multi-word options, and only a single space after for line breaks.
Mar
14
comment Spelling etymology of “-il[l]” words
I would also have guessed it was dependent on the length of the word: Single syllable words using double-L and longer words, using single, in step with tilluntil and fullwonderful
Mar
14
comment How to describe a single point which is a subset of a timeframe?
I still think 'framepixel' might do the trick, you are free to choose of course, someone else might come around with just the right word :) I would delete my answer, as clearly I misunderstood your question, however, I feel your comments do a better trick of explaining your situation, than does your question. So I shall leave it for now. Perhaps consider adding the sentiments in your comments to your original question?
Mar
14
comment integer vs integers
@CaptainCranium "Is there a positive integer n such that there are exactly 14 integers x that satify [...], and if so, what is the value of n" or similar
Mar
14
comment How to describe a single point which is a subset of a timeframe?
In that case how about just using "pixel" and acknowledging that a pixel may have a story? or maybe call it "framepixel"?
Mar
14
answered How to describe a single point which is a subset of a timeframe?