490 reputation
37
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen May 9 '13 at 0:03

Jul
18
awarded  Yearling
Jul
18
awarded  Yearling
Jan
28
awarded  Scholar
Jan
28
accepted To “lay lodged” — what does it mean?
Jan
27
awarded  Student
Jan
27
comment To “lay lodged” — what does it mean?
so "lay" as in "lie down"? Right. Of course. Thanks!
Jan
27
asked To “lay lodged” — what does it mean?
Aug
29
comment Why did author use a different sort of articles in sentence, which describe a picture?
Left is only the chair, which I am assuming was introduced somewhere in the context of the assignment, preferably in writing, but perhaps only by the picture. Perhaps the chair is the only one in the picture, or perhaps the man standing on the chair is thought to be its identifier. Safe to say the author felt sure you would know which chair he meant.
Aug
29
comment Why did author use a different sort of articles in sentence, which describe a picture?
...thus "he rides a bike" is the correct answer until the bike has been introduced. Then on after "he may ride the bike" As for the floor: a floor is generally ever-present it is generally considered implicitly introduced unless the conversation is comparing floors of different types, thus you may use floor in the definite without introducing it.
Aug
29
comment Why did author use a different sort of articles in sentence, which describe a picture?
When there is no previously introduced bicycle, the phrase "to ride the bicycle" refers not to to riding a particular bicycle, but to the riding of bicycles in general. Thus "he rides the bicycle", means he knows how to bike and generally also that he will bike whenever he has cause to
Aug
29
comment Why did author use a different sort of articles in sentence, which describe a picture?
the car is introduced in the parenthesis of the first sentence as: the car the woman is driving in the picture. The parentheses themselves meaning "as is evident". Without parentheses you would have to write: "In A the woman is driving a car. In B the man is driving the car", if the car is the same in both A and B. If the cars are different you would have to use "a car" for both A and B, because neither car had been introduced.
Aug
29
comment Why did author use a different sort of articles in sentence, which describe a picture?
Every item or person should generally be introduced before it can be spoken of in the definite. The book is in the indefinite, because it has not been introduced, if someone said: "The woman is reading the book" people would ask: "What book?" because the sentence assumes (by using definitive) that the the listener knows of the book in question. People might of course still ask "What book?" if you use indefinite, but out of curiosity, not out of misunderstanding. The same explanation goes for letter
Aug
29
comment Why did author use a different sort of articles in sentence, which describe a picture?
First off you cannot simply use whatever, there is a right and a wrong, your teacher will (or at least should) correct you if you if you use the wrong one.
Aug
4
awarded  Constituent
Aug
4
comment When did the term “Jay” come to mean an “unintelligent person”?
Surely an impertinent chatterer would be considered unintelligent in the 17th century, a person of education would have known when to speak and when not to, as well as what to speak about and what not to.
Aug
4
awarded  Caucus
Aug
4
comment Can “origin” be used as an adjective?
Why would you have origin be an adjective? School is not an adjective in school book
Aug
4
revised How did “fʌck” become taboo?
added 131 characters in body
Aug
4
revised Difference between “combination of ” and “combination between”
added 115 characters in body
Aug
3
answered Difference between “combination of ” and “combination between”