Reputation
1,074
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
4 14
Impact
~90k people reached

6m
comment Should I use in 'has' or 'have' in sentence
@HopFrog: The answer to your question is "have", but your sentence is nonsense. "Industrial use" cannot employ anything, and "Consequently" and "on this basis" mean the same thing. Give us a hint of the context, and we'll help you get it right ;)
16m
comment Is “yet” and “ever” interchangeable in “the most pivotal contest yet / ever”
As @JohnClifford says ever is a greater word than yet. In the context of your question the meanings are quite different: ...the most pivotal contest yet, means the most pivotal contest during this election, whereas ...the most pivotal contest ever, means the most pivotal contest of any election throughout history.
26m
comment Can I say “had better do this THAN do sth else”?
I can't make sense of your example sentence. Do you mean "For the sake of learning more, one had better seem to not know what he knows"?, and if so, how does this pertain to your question?
Jan
27
comment Is the comma between “question” and “so” needed? If so, why?
To give the reader time to finish processing the first part, and be clear-headed enough to take in the greater importance of the second part.
Jan
27
comment “[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”
@user58319 "There is a phrase 'broyer du noir', what is the equivalent of this phrase in English" or "There is a phrase 'broyer du noir', what is the equivalent in English" or "There is a phrase 'broyer du noir', what is an equivalent to this phrase in English"
Jan
23
answered Proper phrasing of this sentence
Jan
23
answered If you start an imperative with “you”, does it become a statement or stay as a command?
Jan
23
comment What verbs can you use in a sentence “The movie ”Boyhood“ runs for three hours”?
"Boyhood" takes 3 hours (to watch)... or "Manhood" begins 3 hours after "Boyhood".
Jan
23
comment Grammar: Should the sentence say, “my sister or I” or “my sister or me”?
@rathony, yes indeed, thank you! now fixed :)
Jan
23
revised Grammar: Should the sentence say, “my sister or I” or “my sister or me”?
deleted 3 characters in body
Jan
23
comment “[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”
the "in" variant was part of the question, but the question was edited.
Jan
23
comment “[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”
@sumelic I assume you are referring to the "equivalent in" case? Indeed you are right. The examples show when the words might appear together correctly. "Equivalent in" does not apply correctly to the OPs question, as also itcouldevenbeaboat's answer also states.
Jan
23
revised Why does Tom Hanks pronounce “stupid” as “st-you-pid” in “The Bonfire of the Vanities”?
typo: hear → here
Jan
23
suggested approved edit on Why does Tom Hanks pronounce “stupid” as “st-you-pid” in “The Bonfire of the Vanities”?
Jan
23
comment Why does Tom Hanks pronounce “stupid” as “st-you-pid” in “The Bonfire of the Vanities”?
@Ricky do you mean St U-pid? I pronounce it like that, with a u like in unicorn
Jan
23
comment Why does Tom Hanks pronounce “stupid” as “st-you-pid” in “The Bonfire of the Vanities”?
@Ricky yeah, I see your point.. that would've been one huge slip-up for it to have propagated backwards in time :)
Jan
23
answered “[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”
Jan
23
comment Why does Tom Hanks pronounce “stupid” as “st-you-pid” in “The Bonfire of the Vanities”?
haven't seen the movie, but your spelling and his age in the photo makes me think of Forest Gump.. Does he say it like in Forest Gump? if so, maybe he recently finished filming that movie, and simply slipped.
Jan
21
revised “She has” vs. “she had” been trying to give up smoking for years
clarified the first point
Jan
21
comment The use of “has been”
Your question is unanswerable. It depends on the time of the rest of your text. If this is your first sentence, you may choose freely, so long as you adjust the following sentences accordingly. Bear in mind though, that "was" implies that the situation has changed since then.