Reputation
49,247
Next tag badge:
376/400 score
140/80 answers
Badges
8 49 141
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~2.3m people reached

Mar
4
comment To italicize or not?
@WS2 Oxford Online thinks so.
Mar
4
comment Sentence: use of is/are with you yourself
+1 I might add a clarification, such as ... you (both singular and plural) goes with are ...
Mar
4
comment Word for death by over eating?
Or thanatophage?
Mar
4
comment Word for death by over eating?
Maybe gourmecide?
Mar
4
comment A word for support that is superficial, but not operational
@Jaydles Entries? We don't need no stinkin' entries!
Mar
4
comment Ways of saying “You don't have to be a rocket scientist”
Or so easy, even you can do it!
Mar
4
comment Ways of saying “You don't have to be a rocket scientist”
You don't have to be a climate scientist to pontificate on vast left-wing global warming conspiracy.
Mar
4
answered “Lover of Life”: Biophile?
Mar
4
comment “At this stage” in corporate speak
+1 It's a hedge. At this stage, no. [Implied: at some other stage, maybe yes.]
Mar
4
reviewed Approve Five percent VS The five percent
Mar
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
3
comment A word for support that is superficial, but not operational
Oxford
Mar
3
comment A word for support that is superficial, but not operational
+1 But Wikiworld is the best you can do? Don't you understand that we don't like wiki stuff at SE?
Mar
3
revised Is there an English expression from Latin for “in writing”, “written”, etc?
made clear that an English term is being sought
Mar
3
comment Is there an English expression from Latin for “in writing”, “written”, etc?
We don't do Latin here, except as etymology or if the term has entered into English usage. Perhaps you might want to rephrase to avoid having the question closed.
Mar
3
comment Is it “Does social media” or “Do social media”?
+1 But a computer communicates with a milling machine using media that is social only in that it exists within a society.
Mar
3
answered A word for support that is superficial, but not operational
Mar
3
comment Structure “Training by someone and someone jointly”
It is correct but sounds a bit redundant.
Mar
3
answered What is the origin of the phrase “grease the skids”?
Mar
3
comment Structure “Training by someone and someone jointly”
Why do you think you need to add jointly? The conjunction, and, already indicates the dual involvement.