45,491 reputation
744129
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location New York, United States
age 68
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 7 hours ago

Jan
15
answered Need a word for “Unravel in the worst possible way”
Jan
15
answered Comma before conjuctions in predicates containing two coordinate clauses
Jan
15
answered An adjective to describe a question with an ostensibly simple answer
Jan
13
comment Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
+1 for chasing two rabbits
Jan
12
answered Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
Jan
12
revised English word that means “a process that does not teach you anything”?
added 207 characters in body
Jan
12
answered English word that means “a process that does not teach you anything”?
Jan
12
comment How many can follow up with “you”?
Unlimited,if you include you all.
Jan
8
comment Short question about syntax
Considered it, have we? (note the comma) sounds more like an English don, striding behind his young charges, hands clasped behind his back, challenging their analyses of a philosophical problem.
Jan
8
comment Short question about syntax
+1 But Considered it we? would be fine on Dagobah.
Jan
8
comment is it “likely become” or “likely to become”?
@Hellion Excellent point. Added. Thanks.
Jan
8
revised is it “likely become” or “likely to become”?
clarification per comment.
Jan
8
comment If there was a comma after mole, does it change the meaning of the sentence?
There are numerous Q&As on this site about the Oxford comma, such as this on. Check those to see if they answer your question. Search for the term in the box at the upper right corner.
Jan
8
answered is it “likely become” or “likely to become”?
Jan
8
comment What's the word for “the kind of very close relationship between friends that feels like one involving family/relatives”?
Maybe I'm inviting John over for a brotha-from-anotha-motha dinner.
Jan
8
comment Meaning and derivation of “so-and-so would know from X”
@StoneyB why not add a cite, such as this and make it an answer.
Jan
7
comment idiomatic phrases for *the threat to go to the police*
@HotLicks Since 1984 in NY.
Jan
7
comment idiomatic phrases for *the threat to go to the police*
@HotLicks Or maybe you don't hang out with people who drop dimes on each other.
Jan
7
comment idiomatic phrases for *the threat to go to the police*
@HotLicks It may be the stuff of pulp novels and B movies more than common parlance, but its out there, and I heard it regularly growing up in the northeast US (in your same time period).
Jan
7
answered idiomatic phrases for *the threat to go to the police*