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May
6
comment What does the phrase “switched on” mean in this context?
native speaker: a non-native might use a phrase in an actually wrong way. male/female: to see whether 'guys' and them being switched on might be related to annoyance, or not, ie. to see potential annoyance sources. whether this seems relevant to your colleague might also be informative. also, it might be best to ask the colleague about the meaning.
May
6
comment What does the phrase “switched on” mean in this context?
is your colleague male or female?
May
6
comment What does the phrase “switched on” mean in this context?
is your colleague a native speaker?
Apr
29
awarded  Critic
Apr
29
comment Operator, operand - term for the result?
people are intuitive. computers are strange. if computers are intuitive, people are strange. not every person is a computer - or at least not all the time!
Apr
29
accepted Operator, operand - term for the result?
Apr
29
comment Operator, operand - term for the result?
@AndrewLeach Yes I found "result" not specific enough to "operators"... is just my observation; stemming from the way "operators" are. Vice-versa, I'm having trouble expressing the "operands" in a context not specific to operators... (except contexts 'arguments for commands' and 'arguments passed to functions as parameter value'). The need is that result can be already used.
Apr
29
asked Operator, operand - term for the result?
Apr
13
comment Is “up to” inclusive or exclusive?
@Drew, okay, I was hoping for something less than 10 characters, that's why I asked. :) By the way, I would expect up to but excluding just as good then, but I'm not a native speaker.
Apr
13
comment Is “up to” inclusive or exclusive?
how do I express succintly to disclude the end boundary?
Apr
13
comment Is “up to” inclusive or exclusive?
the joy of finding your question already asked and answered - thanks you people and stackexchange!
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
1
accepted How was the term 'payload' coined?
Jul
1
revised How was the term 'payload' coined?
added 490 characters in body
Jul
1
revised How was the term 'payload' coined?
added 241 characters in body
Jul
1
asked How was the term 'payload' coined?
Jun
27
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
on an off note, feeling constructed also applies to 'concatenate', if you ask me. I lack an alternative. Perhaps 'linking', as robrambusch put it (I can see where this have failed to gain ground.) Regardless, at least I always felt it sounding arbitrary and/or unnatural. I'm non-native if that puts me into a position for anything.
Jun
27
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
not to mention split and join both imply a delimiter; concatenation have no delimiter. yours is the right approach.
Jun
27
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: split needs delimiter. concatenation does not. so split is not (exactly) the 'opposite', it's just (closely) related. Albeit the whole thing depends on what you mean by 'opposite'.
Jun
27
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
@lwburk more importantly, .split needs a delimiter. concatenation does not.