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seen Aug 14 at 8:19

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
1
accepted How was the term 'payload' coined?
Jul
1
revised How was the term 'payload' coined?
added 490 characters in body
Jul
1
revised How was the term 'payload' coined?
added 241 characters in body
Jul
1
asked How was the term 'payload' coined?
Jun
27
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
on an off note, feeling constructed also applies to 'concatenate', if you ask me. I lack an alternative. Perhaps 'linking', as robrambusch put it (I can see where this have failed to gain ground.) Regardless, at least I always felt it sounding arbitrary and/or unnatural. I'm non-native if that puts me into a position for anything.
Jun
27
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
not to mention split and join both imply a delimiter; concatenation have no delimiter. yours is the right approach.
Jun
27
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: split needs delimiter. concatenation does not. so split is not (exactly) the 'opposite', it's just (closely) related. Albeit the whole thing depends on what you mean by 'opposite'.
Jun
27
comment What's the opposite of “concatenate” in programming?
@lwburk more importantly, .split needs a delimiter. concatenation does not.
Jun
27
comment What are the differences between “inverse”, “reverse”, and “converse”?
@JoshCaswell I was thinking the same. verified this usage for myself by checking a random printing glossary. at the same time, getting this effect is indeed called 'inverse' in at least photoshop, of all digital image-related programs.
May
15
comment Is libre the only English single-word adjective signifying 'liberty' without also meaning 'at no monetary cost'?
I was thinking of the word unrestricted, which sounds pretty 'libre'. The thing it starts out as 'un-', I can understand that some people find that intimidating. On the other hand, I find it more clear than either 'free' or 'libre'.
May
15
comment Is libre the only English single-word adjective signifying 'liberty' without also meaning 'at no monetary cost'?
@tchrist 'open source' is not sufficient for expressing the free-as-in-speech variant of 'free' in 'free' software. In my own experience: I have seen software that are 'open source' but contrary to the popular expectation use such a restrictive license that you can not modify it or build upon it at all. On the other hand, for example, Gnu has a definition page for 4 freedoms meant by 'free' at What is free software. Creative Commons differentiates too. Compare free licenses.
May
15
comment Is libre the only English single-word adjective signifying 'liberty' without also meaning 'at no monetary cost'?
@tchrist I thought 'open source' was suggested by Christine Peterson and adopted by a group of people including ES Raymond on January 1998 for Netscape.
May
13
awarded  Yearling
May
13
asked Alternate wording for 'verification and validation'
May
13
comment Difference between “validation” and “verification”
the target page for duplicate is deleted
Apr
2
comment How suffixes like -ness and -ship are chosen when forming abstract nouns?
EdwinAshworth and JohnLawler, yes I was amazed too to find this work. I see your points, but wasn't sure of how free it is, previously. (In particular I considered ease of pronunciation, or etymological reasons.) I think your comments are good as answers as well.
Apr
2
revised How suffixes like -ness and -ship are chosen when forming abstract nouns?
added 56 characters in body
Apr
2
asked How suffixes like -ness and -ship are chosen when forming abstract nouns?
Dec
19
awarded  Popular Question