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Aug
4
comment Order of “not” with infinitive
I think it's well known that any general concern about "splitting the infinitive" with an adverb is a crock, but the construction "to not X" does not sound grammatical to me. It sounds like the speaker of "to not X" is trying to create a new verb "not X" and construe it as a specific verb in a positive sense, which I do not believe is quite correct. So I would say that "to not care" is no more grammatical than its ordinary negation "not to not care", e.g. "I try not to not care" for "I try not to be uncaring.
Aug
4
awarded  Supporter
Jul
27
comment Pronunciation of voiced “th” triggers a consonant shift of “d” and “r”
@DanielHarbour yes, categorically. I say "d" and "t" in exactly the same position -- more retroflex at the end of a word than the beginning. I noticed this pattern in my English when I learned Swedish. My initial /d̪/ "th" sounds exactly like the Swedish "d" and my "d" sounds like a Swedish "r", except that it is only a single stop and not trilled.
Jul
27
comment Pronunciation of voiced “th” triggers a consonant shift of “d” and “r”
Not just my English -- as you say, perfectly normal, just curious.
Jul
27
comment Pronunciation of voiced “th” triggers a consonant shift of “d” and “r”
Just to be clear, my "d" is (to a small degree) retroflex: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiced_retroflex_stop and so is my "r" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retroflex_approximant -- I suppose "retroflex" is what I meant by "pushed back".
Jul
27
awarded  Editor
Jul
27
revised Pronunciation of voiced “th” triggers a consonant shift of “d” and “r”
std term
Jul
27
comment Pronunciation of voiced “th” triggers a consonant shift of “d” and “r”
I would say my stopped "th" is a voiced dental stop en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiced_dental_stop with the tip of the tongue at the inner gumline of the upper front teeth. My smooth voiced "th" is a voiced dental fricative en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voiced_dental_fricative with the tip of the tongue between the teeth. (I have a hard time finding a consistent definition of the IPA symbols anyway.)
Jul
27
awarded  Student
Jul
27
asked Pronunciation of voiced “th” triggers a consonant shift of “d” and “r”
Jul
8
awarded  Teacher
Jul
8
answered Which is more common - 'the most' or 'most'?
Jul
8
answered What does “constitute” mean?