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Aug
22
comment Who's who or Who's whom?
@FumbleFingers I don't think this is a duplicate, since I'm asking specifically in the context of this statement, where the usual rules of who-vs-whom don't seem to apply. Matt's example comment makes the most sense if it's reframed to a different question, but I'm still not sure. Will see if anyone has an alternate/supporting view.
Aug
22
comment Who's who or Who's whom?
Your comment is pretty much Greek to me Matt sorry :) What does that mean in the context of my question?
Oct
8
comment singular and collective noun for included computer source code
This does of course raise the question of where a program's source was sourced, though this is resolved by the context of the statement/question: "I sourced the software" is clear that you didn't necessarily obtain the source code, and "I sourced the source" would suggest you purchased or provisioned the source from a software developer/agency.
Oct
8
comment Is there a word for the phrase “I don't know what I don't know”?
I quite often use the term Unknown unknowns when discussing potential threats or opportunities to project development. This term was popularised (afaik) by Rumsfeld's poorly delivered (but surprisingly relevant) speech.
Oct
8
comment singular and collective noun for included computer source code
I vote on-topic since this is specifically a discussion which pops up occasionally when talking about code with non-technical testers or associated staff, like the boss. I'm a coder and systems designer
Oct
8
comment Something was being touched but no longer is
To be touched is rather complex since humans have many words for touch-actions the language usually suggests the type of touch (soft, rough, sharp, a caress or stroke) as well as often the object or subject performing the touch. Your question also raises the question of how the touch was terminated (as @JDM's answer). For a good answer please provide more context.
Oct
8
comment Describing “not knowing what to do” (as a response to an unexpected event that happened)?
As a consultant myself, "I don't know what to do" is a perfectly valid (and sometimes necessary) response. This kind of fence-sitting (or corporate bs) is purely an exercise in blame-avoidance and risk mitigation. Not only is it not a good answer for this question, but is bad advice in almost any situation. Any consultant 'worth his salt' is quite content to say "I do not know", providing they can follow it with "but I can find out" or "I know someone who might know".