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I want patience and I want it now.

Also, I find that nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

Laziness is what gets me out of bed in the morning.

正宗で大根を切る。

言い出しっぺ。

Some of the smartest things people have ever said:

No language makes perfect sense. — John McWhorter

Neurosis is always a substitute for legitimate suffering. — Carl Jung

A child educated only at school is an uneducated child. — George Santayana

Tactics is knowing what to do when there is something to do. Strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do. — Savielly Tartakower

One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision — Bertrand Russell

Every good thing that happens in your life is a gift. — Yours Truly

If you can't practice self-denial, all you're left with is denial. — Ibid.


Nov
19
comment Book: There Are Two Errors in the the Title of This Book
If Peter Shor says it's a logic question, that's good enough for me. Voting to close.
Nov
17
comment What does “to 1 part in 2x10^5 ” mean?
That's another way of saying "5 ppm" or "five parts per million" . . .
Nov
16
comment Using adverb clauses of time correctly
The "had" is superfluous here, unless you have a specific reason to include it. But I can't think of what that might be.
Nov
16
comment Using adverb clauses of time correctly
@WS2: We only "sit an exam" in BrE.
Nov
15
comment Past passive tense for smite without connoting infatuation, or an alternative
+1. As for people using the word, I'll point out that the band R.E.M. certainly used it, and in this millennium to boot.
Nov
14
comment The definition of 'word-for-word translation'
I don't think intent is implied. "Word for word" means different things to different people in different circumstances. Isn't that ironic?
Nov
14
comment The definition of 'word-for-word translation'
@TRomano: I don't disagree with you either, but I think we're talking about two ends of the same horse. What you describe sounds to me like an annotated translation, which is what the translator's notes about word and idiom choice are all about.
Nov
14
comment The definition of 'word-for-word translation'
That is a literal translation, one that renders idioms and language idiosyncrasies verbatim in the destination language. It's usually a very poor sort of translation. Consider how "I'm as corny as Kansas in August" might be rendered literally in another language. It would be almost entirely incomprehensible.
Nov
14
comment “Can” vs “Able to”: People/Animals vs. Inanimate Objects
There exists no such stricture in English grammar. Apart from that, this issue isn't even about grammar. I am able to discern no reason why this question can qualify for serious consideration.
Nov
13
comment Why does a company's name spelled like a name, even if it's spelled differently in its logo?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about marketing, not English.
Nov
13
comment Should /l/ sound be always pronounced completely?
It's not really full contact. He seems to be curling his tongue in back instead of touching it to the palate. Sorry you can't make the distinction.
Nov
13
comment Should /l/ sound be always pronounced completely?
[Continued] In other words, don't worry about clearly pronouncing the /l/ in words like value. It would sound artificial to rigorously enunciate that sound in that location.
Nov
13
comment Should /l/ sound be always pronounced completely?
Speaking quickly, most Americans I hear would partially glide over the /l/ in words like value, not fully pronouncing it in favor of leaening on the /j/ sound. Sometimes I hear it getting dropped altogether, sounding something like "vayue". The important thing to remember is that both syllables of that word are somewhat emphasized (first syllable strong, second weak), and if you want to make a natural-sounding pronunciation you'll make sure to hit the initial consonants of each in rapid, conversational speech.
Nov
10
comment Fake interviews according to script
I think you need to be a little clearer, perhaps provide examples of what you're talking about. As your question stands, it's likely to be closed as "not clear what you're asking."
Nov
10
comment Comma vs ellipsis in formal writing
No. The only other punctuation besides the em dash should be a comma after each enumerated item except the last.
Nov
10
comment Why was Tokyo sometimes called “Tokio”?
I believe I made it explicit throughout, but especially in the last paragraph.
Nov
10
comment Why was Tokyo sometimes called “Tokio”?
I believe that's what I said, @Bradd.
Nov
9
comment Word for applying liquid to a cloth
This would be a bad choice because tipple has the literal meaning of drinking, and I don't think you wish to suggest drinking potentially harmful chemicals, even filtered through a cloth.
Nov
9
comment Word for applying liquid to a cloth
Certainly any of these are better than tipple, which has certain unattractive connotations.
Nov
9
comment Why is “threshold” pronounced “thresh-hold”?
Well, what about the s in lesen? That's not pronounced with a "sh" sound. And there are verbs like essen which don't normally use the ß except in some inflections.