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11h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
You say the word "is being used in different ways in different speech contexts." That's fine for most words, but that's part of what I'm trying to establish. When is it OK for a "fact" not to be true?
11h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@Mari-LouA: All answers on this site are judged based on the polling mechanism you cite and subject to the same limitations. Many are probably as subjective as this one, if not even more so. Is it wrong to look for consensus here?
13h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@dennisdeems: Do you see no difference between "supposed to have happened" and "happened"?
17h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@Mitch: Something like that. It is certainly not pristine, if it ever was.
17h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@TimRomano: And you, sir, seem determined to misunderstand me or to argue against a point I am not making.
17h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@TimRomano: You're reacting to a burr under your saddle that doesn't really exist. And people do use the term fact to mean "information" without reference to whether the information is accurate or not. If a fact is always true, then why do people ask all of the following: "What are the facts?" and "Are those the real facts?" and "Are those true facts?"
17h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@Mitch: "something said to be true or supposed to have happened" is not something that actually is true or did happen.
18h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@TimRomano: In no wise do I suggest that dictionaries rule the world. The various definitions exist and have been recorded as I describe. Cannot I use the term definition without any order of operation or appeal to authority concerning it?
18h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@Josh61: More of a usage question, really. I'm wondering if the adulteration of the word I describe renders it, ultimately, meaningless and therefore something to be avoided.
18h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@Josh61: Thanks. Interesting comment, but in the end it really only leaves me in the same pickle.
18h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
Only in terms of English. Other languages may have different words to distinguish the two meanings. Apparently we do not. Our word is unfortunately overloaded.
18h
comment Does a “fact” have to be true?
@HotLicks: I think I brought it down from the teleological empyrean enough that it could be answered in this forum.
19h
comment Is there a single word for “this week” or “this month”, like today and tonight?
Chaucer used "to yeere" as well, but it didn't catch on. The fact appears to be that to (from OE to meaning "at" or "on") was useful for the time periods that it survived in, and not in those that it didn't.
19h
comment What is his name again? vs. What was his name again?
"Again" as you're using it is a sentence adverb that can be applied equally to present- or past-tense utterances.
19h
comment “Thanks, my lovelies!”
Only if you know them well and aren't afraid of coming off as sarcastic, foppish, or condescending.
23h
comment Is it correct to say “the said meeting”?
The article is redundant. Not "the said meeting" but "said meeting": We held a meeting last night; said meeting was over in less than five minutes.
1d
comment Which tense is (more) correct in this sentence, the present perfect or past simple?
That's like asking how many words a sentence should have. The answer is: it depends.
1d
comment Someone who is cunning but depicts themselves as innocent to others
A "wolf in sheep's clothing" is the phrase, I believe.
2d
comment Pronunciation of “Personally” and “Finally”
Yes. Basically, all non-stressed syllables tend to get reduced, especially when people speak quickly.
2d
comment I need a new word in the dictionary: Toumly
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because: come on, you're really Lazlo Toth trolling us, right?