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5h
comment “That's a mercy!” - Is this some kind of repartee?
Also, "I closed the windows one by one" is oddly specific, as if to forestall some expectation by the listener that the speaker would have tried to close the windows all at the same time. Each of these things by itself could be shrugged off, but taken together the picture emerges of a (probably) Chinese speaker affecting to write English.
6h
comment What does “the exposed nail” mean?
There is a Japanese proverb 出る釘は打たれる (the nail that sticks out gets hammered in). Perhaps the thought behind your example is similar.
6h
comment “That's a mercy!” - Is this some kind of repartee?
What sort of textbook is this? Can you supply the name of it? Certain things lead me to suspect it's not written by a native speaker of English. E.g., "What's on?" is strange; a native speaker would say "What's up?" or "What's going on?" "I thought it was a thunder"; a native speaker would say "I thought it was thunder." "You began grinding your teeth from midnight"; a native speaker would use at instead of from, most likely. "Watched out the whole night" is just weird.
1d
comment An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?
No. 2 has fallen into disuse, and is unlikely to be recognized. The modern world confers a positive spin on the word, and has for quite some time. Audacious is similar to bold: although both words can carry a negative connotation, that is contextual and in the eye of the beholder. The positive interpretation is not.
1d
comment An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?
Audacious, no. Chutzpah, yes.
1d
comment Would “What he did, he started these buisiness” be correct?
@Sankarane: I thought I had explained. What don't you understand?
2d
comment Old Style Grammar
@chaslyfromUK: I think you mean "one of the old spellings for 'old'."
2d
comment What is the scientific name to humour that is based on surprise
@Fumble: True, but that is the kind he's talking about, if we allow that he has expressed himself clearly.
2d
comment What is the scientific name to humour that is based on surprise
@Fumble: The OP's example sentence marks it as paraprosdokian which makes it a dupe.
2d
comment A different translation of a quotation by Mevlânâ Rûmî
@mitch: I'm drinking as fast as I can and it still keeps spilling over.
2d
comment One word for “within that period of time”?
I'd rephrase: ". . . if the data spans at least five days, during which the sample has not corrupted." (I also might prefer "been corrupted" there.)
2d
comment A different translation of a quotation by Mevlânâ Rûmî
"You can't pour the whole pot of coffee into one cup."
Jul
29
comment Are there linguistic markers that indicate to subordinates a desire to be addressed less formally
You're right, this question probably will be closed as too broad. You can come and chat with us, though. You're likely to get better answers to more specific questions there.
Jul
28
comment use of full stop at the end of incomplete sentence fragment?
At the end of a sentence fragment? Yes.
Jul
28
comment What is a word for a person being “crossways”?
I don't think you're right about that.
Jul
28
comment A grammar question
Voting to close as off topic. This is a style question, not a grammar one, and in any case it doesn't identify a specific source of concern.
Jul
28
comment How do the tenses and aspects in English correspond temporally to one another?
What grammar board would that be? Not on the StackExchange network, surely.
Jul
28
comment Single word for a self-confessed traveler who constantly talks about his travels regardless of the audience interest, circumstance or relevence?
+1 “Bore, n.: A person who talks when you wish him to listen.”—Ambrose Bierce
Jul
28
comment What is the origin of the association of animals to things that are a source of annoyance (major or minor) to people?
This is an interesting question, but I'm voting to close it as off-topic because it's really about human communication in general, perhaps even more about human psychology. In any case, it's not strictly about English.
Jul
28
comment How do the tenses and aspects in English correspond temporally to one another?
+1 and welcome to the site. This is a good answer, enough so that it probably deserves its own venue. I think you should maybe ask a separate question about perfect tenses, to which you would supply this answer. Yeah, you can do that.