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Apr
20
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@Honza: All right, let me put it this way. There are things you tolerate from uneducated speakers (including children) and people who are speaking in a hurry or casually or whatever. You don't expect them to speak like pedants every waking minute of their lives (only pedants do that). What I mean when I say it's OK to say "I forgot my book on the bus" is that EVERYONE WILL KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN AND ONLY PEDANTS WILL GET INTO A HISSY FIT ABOUT IT! As a linguistic crime, it's about at the level of crossing the street a second after the light says not to, but there's still time to cross.
Apr
20
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@Honza: Sigh. People talk the way they talk. Unless you're a hopeless prescriptivist you let that go. As I am letting this question go. I have said all I mean to say. So let's have an end to the sophistry now, all right?
Apr
19
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@WS2: Hey, I'm just reporting what I hear. While "left" is certainly preferable, "forgot" is not rare at all over here, especially as noted above.
Apr
19
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@WS2: Well, in the US you might consider the way a lot of us speak to be that questionable. But there's a hell of a lot of those. Who do you think is putting Donald Trump at the top of the Republican nomination race? Certainly not Oxford dons.
Apr
18
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@WS2: No doubt your American friends are closer to your level of English usage and register. "I forgot my book on the bus" is something you'd likely hear from a child or someone whose verbal skills are not top drawer, or is simply verbally lazy for the nonce. Still, such usage exists here, and I would be surprised if you might not hear it were you to listen a little more closely in your own country outside of your regular milieu.
Nov
20
comment Use of “lever” in The Great Gatsby
Back when they used to have elevator boys, these would run the elevator with a lever. Sometimes a lever is just a lever, even in literature.
Nov
19
comment Should names of styles or genres be capitalized?
The question of which this one is a dupe got 28,828 views, and your 1060 by rights should have gone to it. All you did was tap into the mojo that happens to pervade this topic. Also, Twilight Zone: Yes, I understand and sympathize. The workings of SE can seem very strange and even downright hostile at times. Hope you haven't taken offense.
Nov
19
comment GRE question. What is the meaning of “irregular” here?
No matter. This question is OT anyway.
Nov
19
comment GRE question. What is the meaning of “irregular” here?
@HotLicks: Thanks for disturbing the "teaching moment" . . .
Nov
19
comment GRE question. What is the meaning of “irregular” here?
Did you look at the definitions for all the words? I can see two others that are synonyms . . .
Nov
18
comment the duplicated expression “over more than”
It's at least bad style because of the redundancy, yes, and a troll under the bridge of clear expression.
Nov
16
comment What does “literally” mean?
@FumbleFingers: I wish you had exercised a little more forbearance. Those answers really are not altogether helpful. Voting to reopen.
Nov
15
comment volunteer teacher, volunteer teaching, teaching volunteer, or volunteering teacher
Volunteer teacher or teaching volunteer. "Volunteer teaching" doesn't work and "volunteering teacher" is just horrible.
Nov
14
comment Leave something vs. forget something
I dont know where you get that notion, but I can assure you as a native speaker of English that such a connotation doesn't exist.
Nov
14
comment Source of 'BB' in the sense of 'small, spherical pellet of shot'
Good question, Sven. I grew up with the idea of BB guns, so I've always just taken it for granted.
Nov
14
comment Leave something vs. forget something
No joke. It never even occurred to me that that could be your source of concern, so that in itself should reassure you that this is not an issue.
Nov
14
comment Does the sentence “She tells of the image coming out of an archive” mean that the subject tells that the image comes out of an archive?
The sentence is grammatical enough, but it's ambiguous, which is why it can't stand alone.
Nov
14
comment “My first pro argument is…”
This is a matter of style. The usage feels awkward to me, but I wouldn't mark the student down for it.
Nov
14
comment Does the sentence “She tells of the image coming out of an archive” mean that the subject tells that the image comes out of an archive?
I agree with @FumbleFingers. Absent context, it's impossible even to rule out the notion that she might be coming out of an archive herself as she discusses the image.
Nov
14
comment What is it called when you do something once and benefit from it for a long time or forever
It's called capitalism.