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visits member for 3 years, 4 months
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I want patience and I want it now.

Also, I find that nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

Laziness is what gets me out of bed in the morning.

正宗で大根を切る。

言い出しっぺ。

Some of the smartest things people have ever said:

No language makes perfect sense. — John McWhorter

Neurosis is always a substitute for legitimate suffering. — Carl Jung

A child educated only at school is an uneducated child. — George Santayana

Tactics is knowing what to do when there is something to do. Strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do. — Savielly Tartakower

One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision — Bertrand Russell

Every good thing that happens in your life is a gift. — Yours Truly


20h
comment How do the tenses in English correspond temporally to one another?
Wow. A whole year later you insinuate that my side of this discussion is tantamount to anti-scientific dogmatism? I think you're the one being doctrinaire, and you aren't even aware of it. I posted this in an effort to help people. Who cares how many tenses can dance on the head of a linguist? Purists, snobs, and hidebound dogmatists, that's who.
1d
comment A word similar to pride (without it's troublesome patronizing connotations)
I don't see the patronizing connotations. A son could say this about his parents (or a daughter hers), a teammate could say it about another teammate — and so on — just as easily as a boss could say it about an employee. It does not imply superior station.
Apr
13
comment What does it mean “reject it who will”?
I would say it means something more like "Whosoever may reject it, materialism is nevertheless an excellent choice."
Apr
2
comment What is the difference between deep space and outer space?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about astronomical definitions, not English. Please try astronomy.stackexchange.com
Mar
30
comment Word for not feeling part of a social or economic class
+1: I did not know of this, but it's interesting. I wonder if it explains Richard Nixon.
Mar
29
comment Starting sentences with “as”
@JohnLawler: I responded to the the title and the first sentence only. Part of the new Summer of Love tolerance program. Peace and love, brother.
Mar
29
comment Being in love with someone
Yes, but that is used to suggest, however slightly or humorously or hyperbolically, an abnormal or even unhealthy (by some standards) infatuation. I don't think one would use that to express mere "liking" of a job.
Mar
29
comment Starting sentences with “as”
As you can see, there is nothing wrong with using an adverbial phrase to start a sentence.
Mar
29
comment How would you describe the semantic phenomenon that allows this joke?
Related: english.stackexchange.com/questions/14949/…
Mar
28
comment Where does “my ass” come from?
@KristinaLopez: Not exactly the same situations. My eye is only used when one is reluctant to use my ass in a social situation.
Mar
28
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@KristinaLopez: I thought it was obvious I knew enough about it to assign it to the feminine domain. ^)^
Mar
28
comment How do you politely ask for someone's gender?
@KristinaLopez: Joke. Not intended to be carried to six decimal places. Obviously I am a male who knows what a peplum is.
Mar
28
comment Gender neutral term for “maiden name”?
Seriously, what's wrong with maiden name? I really have a problem seeing your problem.
Mar
27
comment Is “read roughly” a natural response?
Better to say "I glanced at it" or "I looked at it briefly" or even "I took a look at it."
Mar
26
comment Singular or plural in these sentences . .
1: are, is; 2: are; 3: are; 4: are; 5: are. Rule of thumb: when in doubt, substitute a number plural: "There are two chairs (a table and a chair) in the room." Then it becomes obvious.
Mar
24
comment Is “Is it a girl or a boy?” really calling the infant an “it”?
@Marthaª: Sorry. I got here via a roundabout way just now (thinking I was voting on a different question) and made a mistake. I regret to say that there's no way to rectify it now.
Mar
24
comment A more gentle word for the word “settled” in the context of payment
@Pacerier: By all means, fund a study. But a few random people going one way or the other does not a sample make.
Mar
23
comment A more gentle word for the word “settled” in the context of payment
@Pacerier: I disagree that it sounds rude. I think you're confusing the "pay a debt" sense with the "resolve or reach an agreement about (an argument or problem)" sense.
Mar
21
comment Is “Is it a girl or a boy?” really calling the infant an “it”?
What does the "it" refer to in "Is it raining?" or "Is it done yet?" The word can clearly be used in a general way to refer to any unnamed condition. I would thank that "Is it a boy or a girl" is analogous to those cases. It also reminds me of the transference that happens when the nurse comes into your hospital room and asks, "And how are we doing?" There the "we" obviously means "you" and you should get out your ruler and thwack the presumptuous nurse.
Mar
20
comment Is the word “queer” an accepted and polite word for lesbian?
"Less confrontational terms that attempt to reunite the interests of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people also became prominent, including various acronyms like LGBT, LGBTQ, and LGBTI, where the Q and I stand for queer or questioning and intersex, respectively." FWIW, many gays I've known commonly self-identify as queer; it seems to be a stronger way of "putting it out there" than gay is. But I would hesitate to call someone queer myself.