100,484 reputation
20227407
bio website
location United States
age
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen 1 hour ago

I want patience and I want it now.

Also, I find that nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

Laziness is what gets me out of bed in the morning.

正宗で大根を切る。

言い出しっぺ。

Some of the smartest things people have ever said:

No language makes perfect sense. — John McWhorter

Neurosis is always a substitute for legitimate suffering. — Carl Jung

A child educated only at school is an uneducated child. — George Santayana

Tactics is knowing what to do when there is something to do. Strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do. — Savielly Tartakower

One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision — Bertrand Russell

Every good thing that happens in your life is a gift. — Yours Truly

If you can't practice self-denial, all you're left with is denial. — Ibid.

(Note: I edited my bio for a hat.)


Mar
28
comment “walking for five o'clock every morning.” “for”? Why not “at five o'clock”?
This was the down side of having a patron, as Decartes found to his cost. To have a brain like his, fettered to the whim of a monarch . . .it's enough to make one vote socialist.
Mar
28
comment The first letter sound of the name Uzziah
@user77839 It takes five votes or a mod to do that. You can try to from up support on Meta if you want, but I can't open the question.
Mar
28
comment Can “wonder if” be followed by a subjunctive clause only?
The merits of this example aside, don't count on Martin to use English correctly in all cases. He is affecting an imaginary dialect that is an approximation of Wardour Street English, and even then it's not always well done.
Mar
28
comment Can “capable of being hurt…” mean a kind of ability?
Letting down one's guard may be seen to be an affirmative act, or it may merely mean reducing a different act.
Mar
28
comment I'll let you know what I ended up with or what I end up with
Neither one sounds "weird" if used in the correct circumstance. See WS2's answer.
Mar
28
comment I'll let you know what I ended up with or what I end up with
This is the answer.
Mar
27
comment I've learned or I learned correct usage
For me the second is correct in that case. But you probably would benefit from our sister site, English Language Learners.
Mar
27
comment Why is “crowdness” not a proper English word?
@Robusto: It is undoubtedly a mondegreen deceiving you. But I remember the lyrics to songs, and I never heard anything like you say in that one. Here are the lyrics if you don't believe me.
Mar
27
comment Why is “crowdness” not a proper English word?
@HotLicks: I think what you heard was the verbing of Barry Sadler into the line "I've been Lou Adlered, Barry Sadlered." Sadlered, not saded.
Mar
27
comment Is there a word in English that essentially means “I” or “we” in formal context?
"We" is usually used to refer to "any relevant group of people I'm thinking of in this context at this time." Short of that, use some neutral third-person noun that encompasses the group you mean. That can be "the authors" (though not in your case), "the board", "management", or what have you.
Mar
27
comment using “dear ” for men addressing each other
Even between women, addressing someone as dear is very likely to be condescending if not downright caustic. For a man to use it with another man is likely to be an order of magnitude more pejorative. It could even be a prelude to a fist fight.
Mar
27
comment What does it mean to call someone a 'drink of water'?
Congrats on posting the 50,000th question on the site. There is no prize for this.
Mar
26
comment Technical synonym for “old”
I would split them into recent and past (or historical) events. But whoever is worried about "social aging aspects" is clearly focusing on the wrong issues.
Mar
26
comment “To die being hit” vs “to die from being hit.”
The difference is that from attributes cause of death to being hit by the apple. Without it you're just describing the process and letting any listeners draw their own conclusions.
Mar
25
comment Why the extra syllable in words like these ending in -r and -l?
Well, I guess we'll just have to wait for @JohnLawler then. ^_^
Mar
25
comment Why the extra syllable in words like these ending in -r and -l?
What you're hearing is probably the diphthong inserted in those words by certain speakers. It amounts to an extra syllable that "shouldn't" be there. Some dialects feature this production. You'll hear it in other words as well: bayuck for back, etc.
Mar
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
25
revised Is there a term for “purposely deceptive behavior”?
edited title
Mar
25
revised Is there a term for “purposely deceptive behavior”?
Added etymological notes
Mar
25
comment Etymology of “div”
Now I see that HTML has been using <div> to poke fun at us all these years.