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7h
comment Is it correct to say “the said meeting”?
The article is redundant. Not "the said meeting" but "said meeting": We held a meeting last night; said meeting was over in less than five minutes.
13h
answered Someone who is cunning but depicts themselves as innocent to others
19h
comment Which tense is (more) correct in this sentence, the present perfect or past simple?
That's like asking how many words a sentence should have. The answer is: it depends.
1d
comment Someone who is cunning but depicts themselves as innocent to others
A "wolf in sheep's clothing" is the phrase, I believe.
1d
answered Is there English counterpart to Japanese proverb, 一期一会 , meaning “Cherish once -in -a-lifetime encounter”?
1d
comment Pronunciation of “Personally” and “Finally”
Yes. Basically, all non-stressed syllables tend to get reduced, especially when people speak quickly.
2d
comment I need a new word in the dictionary: Toumly
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because: come on, you're really Lazlo Toth trolling us, right?
2d
comment Which should be used - “me” or “myself”?
+1 This is the simplest and best test of when to use one or the other, which I have followed since about the fourth grade. Even Grammar Girl concurs.
2d
comment Which should be used - “me” or “myself”?
Almost always you want to use me there.
May
25
comment Which one is grammatically correct, with “the” or without “the”? Why?
Unless you're talking about history in general, prefer the definite article there: An Introduction to the History and Principles of Heraldry.
May
25
comment What is the appropriate use of “lighted” vs “lit”?
Note that the down vote was not mine. Just wanted to get that on the record.
May
25
comment Correct position of “only”
Also see Why do some verbs have two past tenses, which specifically covers lit/lighted in the accepted answer.
May
25
comment What is the appropriate use of “lighted” vs “lit”?
What to you sounds archaic may to another sound merely more formal, more reserved, or more evocative of something you cannot comprehend out of context. Your graph and the single dictionary citation (I can find other dictionaries that do list "lighted" as alternative past tenses—some even as the primary citation—seem like an over-zealous attempt to prove something that is ultimately not true. In any case, what does it matter? This question was closed as a duplicate anyway.
May
25
comment What is the appropriate use of “lighted” vs “lit”?
I'm talking about the answer as a whole. Your edit is included in my assessment. And this is the place for talking about practices, because that is what the OP is asking about. "Is it acceptable to say 'her eyes lighted up?'" Your answer seems calculated to answer that question in the negative.
May
25
comment What is the appropriate use of “lighted” vs “lit”?
So what is your point, then? That a writer should only prefer phrases that are more frequently encountered? What a boring language we would have if that were true.
May
24
comment What is the appropriate use of “lighted” vs “lit”?
NGrams prove nothing. A lot of the "lit up" you'll find there has nothing to do with eyes lighting up. In fact, "lit up" is gaining currency as meaning "fired upon" as in a battle.
May
24
comment What is the appropriate use of “lighted” vs “lit”?
You can use either. Most people where I'm from would use lit but lighted is certainly acceptable.
May
24
comment Pregnant … somebody
You would say Bill got Anna pregnant, or Anna is pregnant by Bill. Use with to say Bill had a child with Anna or Anna had a child with Bill.
May
24
comment Correct use of 'comprise'
Did you modify the saying? To my ear it would sound better as "Time is what you want most but use worst." Even so, I've never heard this expression and the parallel of "want most/use worst" sounds a bit off to me.
May
23
comment What is a word for what gladiators do?
@Dronz: The end result is the same. It's the savagery that counts.