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I want patience and I want it now.

Also, I find that nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

Laziness is what gets me out of bed in the morning.

正宗で大根を切る。

言い出しっぺ。

Some of the smartest things people have ever said:

No language makes perfect sense. — John McWhorter

Neurosis is always a substitute for legitimate suffering. — Carl Jung

A child educated only at school is an uneducated child. — George Santayana

Tactics is knowing what to do when there is something to do. Strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do. — Savielly Tartakower

One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision — Bertrand Russell

Every good thing that happens in your life is a gift. — Yours Truly

If you can't practice self-denial, all you're left with is denial. — Ibid.


6h
comment “like a duck takes to water” vs “like a fish takes to water”
@JohnLawler: I disagree that it is "not quite right." The writer is presumably inverting (or otherwise altering) the trope, which is certainly fair game. He means to disturb your ear, which is why you find it odd.
7h
comment “like a duck takes to water” vs “like a fish takes to water”
I disagree that it is "not quite right." The writer is presumably inverting the trope, which is fair game.
11h
comment What does “The city (Ferguson) learned too late that the well was dry” mean?
Not to beat this to death, but interjections are normally used to express emotion, and are not denotative. I think we understand that term differently.
11h
comment What does “The city (Ferguson) learned too late that the well was dry” mean?
A lot of things are analogous to saying "yes." If you ask me, "Did you bring any fruit?" and I say "Banana," "banana" is an affirmation and the equivalent of saying "yes," but is it an interjection?
11h
comment What does “The city (Ferguson) learned too late that the well was dry” mean?
I fail to see how it's an interjection. For me, it's still a noun: "[I have written a] check [next to that entry]."
15h
comment What does “The city (Ferguson) learned too late that the well was dry” mean?
I would note that the writing is not particularly good in that passage. The cliché of the well works against the one of the checklist: stale tropes for a stale, increasingly irrelevant publication.
15h
comment What does “The city (Ferguson) learned too late that the well was dry” mean?
+1, but I don't think "check" is being used as a verb here. Instead, it's a noun referring to the check marks one puts next to items in a list, calling them off one by one in antiphonal response as each item is queried. "Al Sharpton?" (Is Al Sharpton on the list?) "Check." (Yes, I have given him a check mark for he is on the list.)
1d
awarded  Explainer
1d
awarded  Refiner
1d
comment using the word come for when it comes
It's not American English, it's just English. And it's been around a long time. Cf. Ralph Vaughan Williams "English Folk Song Suite" which includes a song called "Seventeen Come Sunday", written almost 100 years ago.
2d
reviewed Reviewed Which is correct: digestive “tract” or digestive “track”?
2d
reviewed Reviewed What is difference between “huge” and “massive”?
2d
reviewed No Action Needed Is there any “swearword” in English not associated with excrements, the genitals, sexual activity or religion?
2d
reviewed Close What are “crutch words”?
2d
reviewed Close Which is or are grammatically correct: “Cats are carnivores / carnivorous or carnivorous animals”?
2d
comment Which is or are grammatically correct: “Cats are carnivores / carnivorous or carnivorous animals”?
I would go further than Jim and say there's hardly a dime's worth of difference between them.
2d
reviewed Close What does “develops the issue” mean?
2d
reviewed Close What is another word for an weak or unsatisfying (to the viewer) smile?
2d
reviewed Close How is 'Tacenda' used in a sentence?
2d
reviewed Close another way to say “happy to hear that […]”?