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comment What word(s) do children of English native speakers use for “kid”/“child”/etc
@Brian: I know. For children, guy starts to be heard as puberty approaches and they feel more like beginning the transition to adulthood. "Guy" is still less likely to be used by female children to refer to other girls, though.
1h
answered What word(s) do children of English native speakers use for “kid”/“child”/etc
1d
comment “That's a mercy!” - Is this some kind of repartee?
Also, "I closed the windows one by one" is oddly specific, as if to forestall some expectation by the listener that the speaker would have tried to close the windows all at the same time. Each of these things by itself could be shrugged off, but taken together the picture emerges of a (probably) Chinese speaker affecting to write English.
1d
comment What does “the exposed nail” mean?
There is a Japanese proverb 出る釘は打たれる (the nail that sticks out gets hammered in). Perhaps the thought behind your example is similar.
1d
comment “That's a mercy!” - Is this some kind of repartee?
What sort of textbook is this? Can you supply the name of it? Certain things lead me to suspect it's not written by a native speaker of English. E.g., "What's on?" is strange; a native speaker would say "What's up?" or "What's going on?" "I thought it was a thunder"; a native speaker would say "I thought it was thunder." "You began grinding your teeth from midnight"; a native speaker would use at instead of from, most likely. "Watched out the whole night" is just weird.
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revised What do you call someone who desperately needs (or better said craves) everyone to like them?
added 348 characters in body
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answered What do you call someone who desperately needs (or better said craves) everyone to like them?
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comment An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?
No. 2 has fallen into disuse, and is unlikely to be recognized. The modern world confers a positive spin on the word, and has for quite some time. Audacious is similar to bold: although both words can carry a negative connotation, that is contextual and in the eye of the beholder. The positive interpretation is not.
2d
comment An adjective or noun for someone who “has a lot of gall”?
Audacious, no. Chutzpah, yes.
2d
comment Would “What he did, he started these buisiness” be correct?
@Sankarane: I thought I had explained. What don't you understand?
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answered Would “What he did, he started these buisiness” be correct?
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revised Old Style Grammar
edited body
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comment Old Style Grammar
@chaslyfromUK: I think you mean "one of the old spellings for 'old'."
2d
comment What is the scientific name to humour that is based on surprise
@Fumble: True, but that is the kind he's talking about, if we allow that he has expressed himself clearly.
2d
comment What is the scientific name to humour that is based on surprise
@Fumble: The OP's example sentence marks it as paraprosdokian which makes it a dupe.
2d
comment A different translation of a quotation by Mevlânâ Rûmî
@mitch: I'm drinking as fast as I can and it still keeps spilling over.
Jul
30
comment One word for “within that period of time”?
I'd rephrase: ". . . if the data spans at least five days, during which the sample has not corrupted." (I also might prefer "been corrupted" there.)
Jul
30
comment A different translation of a quotation by Mevlânâ Rûmî
"You can't pour the whole pot of coffee into one cup."
Jul
29
comment Are there linguistic markers that indicate to subordinates a desire to be addressed less formally
You're right, this question probably will be closed as too broad. You can come and chat with us, though. You're likely to get better answers to more specific questions there.
Jul
28
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