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visits member for 3 years, 9 months
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I want patience and I want it now.

Also, I find that nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

Laziness is what gets me out of bed in the morning.

正宗で大根を切る。

言い出しっぺ。

Some of the smartest things people have ever said:

No language makes perfect sense. — John McWhorter

Neurosis is always a substitute for legitimate suffering. — Carl Jung

A child educated only at school is an uneducated child. — George Santayana

Tactics is knowing what to do when there is something to do. Strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do. — Savielly Tartakower

One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision — Bertrand Russell

Every good thing that happens in your life is a gift. — Yours Truly

If you can't practice self-denial, all you're left with is denial. — Ibid.


12h
comment How to reply to someone's welcome
@Fumble: Well, in some cases, the suspected adverb is really an adjective. "Your car looks red" is a pretty exact parallel to "Granddad acts silly" in my view. You would never say "Your car looks redly," nor would you say "Grandpa acts sillily." This area still looks kind of gray (not "grayly") to me.
12h
comment How to reply to someone's welcome
@Fumble: Check Kosmonaut's answer regarding adjective/adverb substitution. I think that about nails it.
1d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
comment Words with pronunciations more complex than spelling
@supercat: I thought about it, and then I thought: why? Best-case scenario for your theory: maybe one or two "thought leaders" intended a portmanteau when pronouncing it that way, and the rest just thought that was the correct pronunciation. Occam's Razor and all that.
2d
comment Words with pronunciations more complex than spelling
@supercat: Interesting theory, but I doubt it. It's heard too often to be an intentional portmanteau. Most people aren't that clever.
2d
revised Meaning of “niche” in “he knows the niches of this or that genre”
added 37 characters in body
2d
answered Meaning of “niche” in “he knows the niches of this or that genre”
2d
comment Meaning of “niche” in “he knows the niches of this or that genre”
OK, with added context it clearly means (1). But it's poorly expressed.
2d
comment Meaning of “niche” in “he knows the niches of this or that genre”
I would say it is more likely to mean (2), but agree more context is needed.
Aug
27
comment “Thousand Dollars Worth” or “Thousand Dollars' Worth”. Is this a Possessive?
@adam.smith Good point. This answer was given before I started reevaluating use of NGrams on ELU.
Aug
27
comment “I won't stay longer than I can help” or “longer than I can't help”?
@PeterShor: +1, although I will note that "I could care less" may be viewed as an elliptical rendering of "[As if] I could care less."
Aug
27
comment In the word “Scent”, is the S or the C silent?
The referenced post is making an attempt at humor. The point is, such a question has no answer, since the distinction is meaningless.
Aug
27
comment What is the difference between Anglia and England?
Do you see a difference between when it's used and when it's not used? In other words, when a thing is not used one would suppose there can be no problem with it. E.g., if you don't use a knife you won't cut yourself with it.
Aug
26
comment How to say that event is happening now?
Related.
Aug
26
comment Can word-hyphenation ever be semantically significant?
As I read this 2.5 years later, your insistence that all language is spoken strikes me funny. What about sign language? Surely there are other forms of semiotics besides what we would call speech that would qualify as language. And if there are, it follows that written words and sentence qualify as language as well. We have communicated for years, you and I, and yet nary a spoken word has passed between us.
Aug
22
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
21
comment the person who is big -headed always says he is superior and mistakes others
Calling them Einstein in a voice dripping with sarcasm usually does the trick.
Aug
18
comment “Like” versus “not unlike”
FWIW, George Orwell hated the "not un-" pattern so much that he tried to create a vaccine against it.
Aug
14
answered What is the difference between “in my opinion” and “to my taste”?
Aug
13
comment Why don't we use an apostrophe to denote ownership on 'it'?
@JohnLawler: Tell me you don't wear a tie clip. Seriously.