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Apr
20
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@Honza: All right, let me put it this way. There are things you tolerate from uneducated speakers (including children) and people who are speaking in a hurry or casually or whatever. You don't expect them to speak like pedants every waking minute of their lives (only pedants do that). What I mean when I say it's OK to say "I forgot my book on the bus" is that EVERYONE WILL KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN AND ONLY PEDANTS WILL GET INTO A HISSY FIT ABOUT IT! As a linguistic crime, it's about at the level of crossing the street a second after the light says not to, but there's still time to cross.
Apr
20
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@Honza: Sigh. People talk the way they talk. Unless you're a hopeless prescriptivist you let that go. As I am letting this question go. I have said all I mean to say. So let's have an end to the sophistry now, all right?
Apr
19
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@WS2: Hey, I'm just reporting what I hear. While "left" is certainly preferable, "forgot" is not rare at all over here, especially as noted above.
Apr
19
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@WS2: Well, in the US you might consider the way a lot of us speak to be that questionable. But there's a hell of a lot of those. Who do you think is putting Donald Trump at the top of the Republican nomination race? Certainly not Oxford dons.
Apr
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
18
comment Leave something vs. forget something
@WS2: No doubt your American friends are closer to your level of English usage and register. "I forgot my book on the bus" is something you'd likely hear from a child or someone whose verbal skills are not top drawer, or is simply verbally lazy for the nonce. Still, such usage exists here, and I would be surprised if you might not hear it were you to listen a little more closely in your own country outside of your regular milieu.
Apr
15
answered What does “the New York egoscape “ mean?
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23
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Mar
9
awarded  Enlightened
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2
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Jan
28
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Jan
28
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Jan
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24
awarded  Great Question
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15
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Dec
11
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Nov
23
awarded  Yearling
Nov
20
comment Use of “lever” in The Great Gatsby
Back when they used to have elevator boys, these would run the elevator with a lever. Sometimes a lever is just a lever, even in literature.