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2h
comment What does bi-weekly mean?
Once every two weeks.
20h
comment What's the message of this Yogi Berra quote?
I think that is the real meaning, and if you make that quote and its context the thrust of your response I will upvote it.
20h
comment Colors = Crayons?
"Colors" may refer to crayons, markers, pencils, paints, chalks, or what have you. A teacher can tell students to take out their books without specifying which ones. Given the context, the students will just know what is meant by such general terms.
21h
comment What's the message of this Yogi Berra quote?
It could mean merely that they are unteachable. Perhaps also that they can acquire knowledge only without assistance, i.e., that they have to teach themselves or they can't learn.
21h
comment Could you please do X vs. Could you do X please
I still think you're supposing that word order carries more semantic freight here than it really does. I can hear either of those as being neutral or aggressive, depending on the tone used.
21h
comment Is “nodding” always a conscious act?
"Nod" is also a figurative way of saying "sleep."
23h
comment Using bold or italic text in quotes
If you are quoting material in a formal paper, you are not supposed to call out words for emphasis unless (1) they were so emphasized in the original or (2) you add a disclaimer indicating that you added the emphasis. For informal uses you can do whatever you like.
23h
comment Usage of a word in parenthesis to provide optional meaning
I've seen it in all manner of writing, including academic and scientific papers.
1d
comment Could you please do X vs. Could you do X please
Normal: "Please do not feed the bears." Irritated: "Please do not feed the bears." Apoplectic: "Please do not feed the fucking bears!"
1d
comment Could you please do X vs. Could you do X please
It all depends on tone of voice. The placement of please in a sentence has nothing to do with irritation. I suggest you're reading that into it.
1d
comment When the boss is a way?
My point is, you didn't get that picture here.
1d
comment When the boss is a way?
Just one more example of why you shouldn't get spelling and grammar tips from the unwashed Internet.
1d
comment Idiom meaning diverting somebody's attention from a topic which you don't want to talk on
It might even be more accurate to say that subject-changing is a form of deflection, rather than the other way around.
1d
comment Idiom meaning diverting somebody's attention from a topic which you don't want to talk on
@Flater: It's a form of subject-changing, in my view.
1d
comment Usage of “so to” in the place of “to” as part of infinitive construction
It is part of the infinitive construction.
1d
comment Usage of “so to” in the place of “to” as part of infinitive construction
Not a preposition there.
1d
comment “Your” home or home
Either could be correct.
1d
comment When to use commas before and after of course in a sentence
No, you don't need them in that case.
1d
comment Difference between “irascible”, “fractious”, “irritable” and “atrabilious”?
I have lived a long full life, and this is the first time I have ever seen atrabilious used. And I've never heard it used, not once.
2d
comment Difference between “irascible”, “fractious”, “irritable” and “atrabilious”?
Get off my lawn!