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bio website brightnorth.com
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seen Nov 19 at 0:45

Nov
23
awarded  Yearling
Nov
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
6
awarded  Custodian
Mar
6
reviewed Edit How to say “it gives an opportunity” in a word?
Mar
6
revised How to say “it gives an opportunity” in a word?
deleted 1 characters in body
Mar
6
reviewed Reject “Extensible” vs. “extendible”
Nov
27
awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Yearling
Apr
8
comment Is “this Monday” or “next Monday” the correct way to refer to the very next Monday in the future?
@barlop - same as 'three weeks from today', obviously. You can scale this up - 'a year on monday' would be 53 weeks hence. As I said, in my previous comment, we have yesterday/today/tomorrow to add clarity - we can infer something from their lack of use as well. '2 weeks on monday' = 21 days; '2 weeks today' = 14 days. Likewise, as Robusto suggests, if today is Sunday, 'next Monday' would be in 8 days; if we meant the next actual Monday (i.e. the next day) would have more likely said 'tomorrow'.
Apr
8
comment Is “this Monday” or “next Monday” the correct way to refer to the very next Monday in the future?
@barlop in summary, my answer is that the meaning could be ambiguous, depending on the differing interpretation of listener and speaker. To avoid this ambiguity, we use yesterday/today/tomorrow (and next Monday), when needed, to clarify. It's easy enough to be clear, but we also like to be brief, which is where we can introduce this ambiguity.
Apr
7
comment Is “this Monday” or “next Monday” the correct way to refer to the very next Monday in the future?
@barlop - I'd say two weeks - a week after the next Monday after today. If you meant one week, you would probably say a week today.
Mar
27
awarded  Enlightened
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27
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
31
comment Someone who comes across as “airheaded” but is really quite the opposite
@J.R. - Perhaps I've not been clear - I largely agree with JAM's answer (and Elendil's) - they both votes from me. I disagree with Robusto's understated; this suggests the direction is right but the magnitude is wrong - but I think the OP means that the magnitude is perhaps equal, but the direction is completely wrong. I hope this vector analogy makes sense! Agree - let the OP wade it...
Jan
31
comment Someone who comes across as “airheaded” but is really quite the opposite
I'd argue, understated suggest subtlety, whereas the OP seems to be suggesting a deceptive appearance. The subject in question does not come across an understated way, but in a completely different way.
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23
awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Pundit
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awarded  Enlightened
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9
awarded  Nice Answer
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awarded  Caucus