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Feb
16
comment What does “Screw motivation” mean?
Well, I thought it was funny. At the time.
Feb
10
comment Is there a word for excessive use of articles?
Hyperbole solves everything! Use "hyper-articulated". (actually, use @Dan Bron's suggestion of overarticulated, to me it's the best choice)
Feb
10
comment Alternatives to “break a butterfly on a wheel”
@blmoore - I meant beat a dead mouse as a counterpoint to flog a dead horse. The former indicates action that is no longer -necessary-, while the latter indicates action that is no longer -useful-. Seems different enough to me to justify a different phrase.
Dec
9
comment “Technology” is to “technical” as “memory” is to what?
By memory are you referring to human or mechanical memory? Human memory, I'd think technical is to technology as memory is to retention. For mechanical memory, I think the word would be state. You could use state in either context, but IMHO it's more mechanical memory. Justification - technology is expression of a technical concept. State is an expression of a memory concept.
Dec
9
comment A one word replacement when referring to multiple family members
The order of definitions in that link is interesting - I would have thought the parental definition would be primary. Perhaps drop the s and state "I'm going shopping with my folk"?
Oct
2
comment Is there the word “ideotechnical” in English?
Upvote for that anthroponymy link - interesting. The etymology of handles is a rich well I don't see many people drawing from (I'm quite sure that statement will draw an URLStorm of links).
Oct
2
comment Odd, but unoffensive slang or idioms
An alternative model for this is 1982's "A Christmas Story" where the father of the protagonist cursed constantly but with unintelligible syllables. Check it out for other ideas - maybe come up with a unique sound to give your story some color.
Jul
25
comment What is the meaning of “one must of necessity”?
Yep, I gave that a little too cursory reading. Still not sure what to do with "thinker in action". And +1 to JR's comment.
Jul
21
comment What is the meaning of “one must of necessity”?
That's a poorly written sentence: "so always master of the situation"...must of necessity is also a redundancy. I think the writer is trying to say great leaders must be great thinkers. Ugh. I would look for better texts to read if you have the option.
Jul
21
comment Are there rules for constructing portmanteaux?
Rules? More like conventions, and most of those are more about production (phonotactics) than actual syntax. Bennifer is perfectly OK but Jenjamin was not. Rules in play there?
Jul
10
comment “For the time being” vs. “for now”
Lout vs. churl seems fairly interchangeable too, BTW.
Jul
10
comment “For the time being” vs. “for now”
Well that downvote is just gratuitous.
Jul
9
comment What do you call a person who collects recipes, ingredients or other cooking related materials?
Maybe a cup-boarder, sounding like hoarder? Or just straight up cup-hoarder?
Jul
9
comment When should I say “thee”?
Or when you're asking permission to bump the other rappers in the top 10.
Jul
9
comment “For the time being” vs. “for now”
Then were the times that try men's souls. And stupid and ignorant do seem to be going that way.
Jul
9
comment “For the time being” vs. “for now”
No, I see that they may have not been interchangeable in the past but have closed on each other and since 1920 may be interchangeable. I am just looking at the distance between the lines.
Jul
9
comment “For the time being” vs. “for now”
My logic - if 2 words appearence in the corpus track closely (e.g. ship vs. boat, compared to ship vs. canoe), I posit it's an indication that they seemed similar to the English speakers of that time. Correlation does not imply causation, but a clear relationship implies the words are linked somehow. I don't see that in the graph of the two phrases from the OP.
Jul
9
comment “For the time being” vs. “for now”
However, followup to Em1 - if I apply my logic to my original answer, the recent merge and crossing of the "for now"/"For the time being" lines implies that perhaps the phrases are interchangeable, whether "for now" or "for the time being".
Jul
9
comment “For the time being” vs. “for now”
Because of the spread of the lines - almost 1 order of magnitude at peak. To me this indicates that writers of these eras did not substitute these phrases freely. Compare route vs. path: books.google.com/ngrams/…
Jul
6
comment Is there a single word for 'scaring a person for sake of fun'?
The threshold for a practical joke seems higher than what's described here. Leading the person out into the woods after the movie under false pretenses and then scaring them would be more of a practical joke, to me.