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seen Feb 1 at 20:04

Jun
28
comment Origin of “the wrong end of the stick”
Shitty deal. :D
Jun
28
comment Meaning of “have head in the wrong place”
As do you, I have heard it used that way as well, now that you mention it.
Jun
28
comment Origin of “the wrong end of the stick”
In that case, shit still happens, it's just stuck which makes it even more shitty. (Is this against the rules? :D)
Jun
28
comment Origin of “the wrong end of the stick”
True enough. But if you must touch a stick with shit on it (and hey, shit happens, so it's not an impossibility), I would say the non-shitty end would be the right end and vice versa.
Jun
28
comment Origin of “the wrong end of the stick”
Wait, if you grabbed a stick by the shitty end, you wouldn't think you'd grabbed the wrong end? I would.
Jun
28
comment Meaning of “have head in the wrong place”
I agree except on the 'head in the clouds' part. To me it seems this is more about being lost in thought (which may be perfectly sound and reasonable thoughts), and thus being unaware of what going on around you.
Jun
28
comment Meaning of “have head in the wrong place”
"Head in the sand" is more about intentionally ignoring something because it's uncomfortable to acknowledge; the equivalent of putting your fingers in your ears and shouting LALALALA when someone is saying something you don't want to hear. Whereas "Head in the clouds" refers to someone who daydreams or gets caught up in their thoughts to the point of becoming unaware of their surroundings. "Head in the game" seems more closely related to the phrase in the OP...if your head is in the game, you are thinking about the task at hand.
Jun
28
comment Meaning of “have head in the wrong place”
You may be right, my opinion is that the phrase could be taken either way without further context. Regardless, the question was about the term "head in wrong place" which has nothing to do with whether the relationship advice is being directed at the older or younger person.
Jun
28
comment Should “the” ever be dropped from the beginning of a name/title?
'The' is not being dropped, it is being used in the proper part of the sentence. Where are your references to actual grammatical rules, such as those I included in my answer?
Jun
28
comment Should “the” ever be dropped from the beginning of a name/title?
J.R. - which side of the campus is his office on? The western The Ohio State University, the eastern The Ohio State University?
Jun
28
comment Should “the” ever be dropped from the beginning of a name/title?
So, just to clarify, if you were swimming at the northern shore of the Red Sea, you would be swimming in the northern Red Sea, not the northern The Red Sea. 'The' may be used as part of a name, but it is still a definitive article, and is treated the same as a definitive article anywhere else. You wouldn't say 'the northern The Thames' or 'the British The Times' or 'the English The Queen' or 'the new The Doon School campus'.
Jun
28
comment Why use “the” for oceans/seas/rivers etc. but not lakes?
Those who live in The Hague never stopped using an old-fashioned name that described the place according to its medieval use. We get the official name Den Haag from Des Graven Hage, which means "the counts' hedge" and refers to the fact that Dutch noblemen once used the land for hunting. Many other place names started off as descriptions with definite articles. For example, the city of Bath, England, famous for its purportedly health-supporting natural spring, was referred to as "The Bath" until the 19th century. Etc...
Jun
28
comment Should “the” ever be dropped from the beginning of a name/title?
I'd also like to point out to Barrie England that "The Queen" is only "The Queen" if you happen to reside in a specific geographical area.
Jun
28
comment Should “the” ever be dropped from the beginning of a name/title?
btw, the book title is a different beast altogether. You wouldn't say "I read the Learning to Knit" but we might say "I read the book Learning to Knit". You might even say "I read the Learning to Knit book" even though it's a bit awkward.
Jun
28
comment Should “the” ever be dropped from the beginning of a name/title?
In the answer I linked to, it has already been answered that rivers are preceeded by the definitive article 'the' (the Thames). I'm guessing you are talking about a specific Times, a specific Queen, etc?
Jun
28
comment Why use “the” for oceans/seas/rivers etc. but not lakes?
There is also The Hague, an archaic reference that stuck around.
Jun
28
comment Should “the” ever be dropped from the beginning of a name/title?
"The Doon School" has decided to include the definitive article in their name, similarly, the definitive article has already been included in the title of the book (it is about specific adventures, not adventures in general). 'The' does not cease to be a definitive article in this case, it still indicates that you are talking about a specific school and not any school. Barrie England: this could be a similar case to "the Hague" an archaic reference that just never went away.
Jun
28
comment Should “the” ever be dropped from the beginning of a name/title?
tyjkenn: can you give me an example of something which has "the" as part of the name? rudra: I don't understand your question.
Jun
28
comment Why use “the” for oceans/seas/rivers etc. but not lakes?
yes, I realized that shortly after answering, and subsequently found the correct answer.